Omega, Grasmere & Dolphin House. The Street. Charmouth
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As you climb The Street towards the top on the right hand side are three adjoining cottages set back with their pretty front gardens. I will attempt to tell their story as far as I can from the records and information I have been able to glean about them so far.
It was in 1297 that the Abbot of Forde who owned the Village of Charmouth decided to create a Borough out of it. The original document has survived and forms part of a Cartulary kept at Forde Abbey. It records " Those wishing to build within these bounds plots measuring 4 perches by 20 perches, by the view of the monks' bailiff, rendering 6d a year for each burgage in equal portions at Michaelmas and Easter " .
The 1841 Tithe map is valuable as if you add the area of the plot (t.no.70) on which the neighbouring “The Stone House” (t.no.69) stands to the plot making up the 3 properties, the area approximates to that of one of the burgage plots (80 perches). The wall to the north still exists and fragments of the boundary walls can still be seen.
The earliest record of the properties according to the historian, Reginald Pavey appears in the deeds to “The Stone House” to the east, which refer to an Indenture of March 1657 ,” for a term of 800 years between Edward Melpley and Nicholas Clegg and William Armstrong, which said that on the west was a little cottage, stable and garden with a tenement or burgage in the tenure of A. Bolston”. The Protestation List in 1641 records a Balstone living in the village. The first Poor Rates list for 1754 show that the Lord of the Manor at that time - Richard Henvill paying for a property known as "Balsons". The earliest parish record for the family is in 1681 when William Balstone is buried and in 1705 Elizabeth Balstone is laid to rest. Then there is a big jump to 1797 when George Balstone, son of Samuel is baptised. From this we can gather that there was definitely a property here from at least the mid 17th century, which belonged to the Balstone family. But at present the whole of the 18th Century is a blank for the 3 properties, but that could change if I can locate any early deeds. But in the next century it is much easier to trace ownership as Charmouth is fortunate in that the Dorset Record Office has a run of Land Taxes from 1780 until 1832 and Poor Rates that are more detailed from 1800 until 1832. Then there is a jump to 1841, which is the year of the first Census and the Tithe Map, which are much more accurate. Even so, houses rarely have names on these lists and it is a processes of elimination to pin point them. The Tithe Map gives us the best clues as it shows both owners and occupiers of properties. In this case, Tithe Number 70 represents all three buildings and their gardens, which are owned by representatives of Francis Hyde. It then records that John Freeman and others occupy them. In the same year the first accurate Census for the country appeared and provides a tremendous amount of information on the families living there in that year. It shows that Sarah Kennaway, aged 65,is renting Lynwood (Dolphin House) with her servants - Ann Knight and Ann Hunter. Sophia Freeman, aged just 18, is at Grasmere with a servant. Elizabeth Leach, aged 30, of independent means, is renting Omega House (Fountain Cottage), with Mary Richards and Jane How as her servants.
From this information I have slowly been able to work both ways from 1841 to provide a history of the group of houses over two centuries. The most amazing conclusion is that one family were to own them for over 100 years. The first member was John Ridges who originated from Kenilworth in Warwickshire. They were very wealthy and his brother and family appear on a list for the town paying a tax for their hair powder in 1795. John comes to Charmouth in 1785 by purchasing or inheriting a house and orchard. He then prospers and the Poor Rates show him buying a number of other properties over the years that he rents out. His name appears regularly on Voters lists for Dorset and is described as a Gentleman. His first daughter, Dianna, is baptised in 1797 in the village Church and they go on to have at least another three children, but sadly his wife Mary dies in 1807. Their eldest daughter marries Josiah Hyde, a Surgeon living in Kenilworth in 1815. John Ridges is buried in 1823 and his long Will provides a mass of information concerning the many properties he owns, which include a number in Charmouth. He provides details of whom he bought them from and his tenants. He is especially generous to his housekeeper and her daughter and provides them with an annuity. The bulk of his estate was to go to his daughter Diana, who would have been 26 at the time and married to Josiah Hyde living as a Surgeon's wife in Kenilworth. He instructs John Knight of Axminster to be the Trustee and the Poor Rates for the next few years show the tenants paying their rents to him. It is interesting to see that the Knights own the neighbouring “Stone House” which they rent out to Robert Sweeting, who is also a Surgeon. Amongst his tenants is a Robert Kennaway described as Esq. in an 1830 directory of the time, which is also the year of his death and his wife, Sarah who continues renting from the executors. She is later shown in the 1841 Census as being of independent means aged 65, and was employing Ann Knight and Ann Gunter as Servants at the property. She died in 1855 aged 81 and left a considerable Estate as is shown by her Will which is kept at The Public Record Office.
It has been difficult at this stage to find out more about Diana and her husband, Josiah Hyde. No doubt she lived a comfortable life in Kenilworth and trustees ran the estate her father had provided. The Church records later record her and her husband returning to Charmouth to baptise their daughter, Mary in 1821.
The 1851 Census provides information on the three properties we are looking at in that year. Sarah Kennaway is still living at Omega, but she is to die aged 81, 4 years later. Her neighbour at Grasmere is Elizabeth, wife of the late John Freeman, and Lynwood is shown as being unoccupied. The next Census for 1861 reveals that Dianna Hyde, now aged 74, has returned back to live in her childhood home, with her three unmarried daughters – Louisa, Annie and Helen. She is probably living at Lynwood House and renting the adjoining Grasmere House. A decade later shows them all continuing to live in the same house. Mary Hunt appears to be renting the adjoining house from her and is described as a Lodging House Keeper. But in 1872, Diana Hyde, dies aged 73 and is buried at St. Andrews Church in Charmouth, leaving Helen and Louisa to inherit her Estate. Both sisters continue to live in the village. Louisa in a property, next to the Elms, which was known as Miss Hyde's Cottage and was demolished shortly after she died in 1900. Her sister, Helen was to carry on living at Lynwood House and renting out “Grasmere”. Both owned a number of other houses in the village including Wistaria and the Retreat.
The 1881 Census reveals George Pavey,a retired Surgeon, aged 46 renting Grasmere. His son Reginald was to retire young and become Charmouth`s great historian and in his notes he writes:
“When my father came to Charmouth in 1877 with my mother and two sisters he rented 'Grasmere”, the first house on the north side of 'The Street' below 'Portland House', from Miss Hyde, with stables and coach house. The latter were converted into a laundry with a nursery upstairs. The yard in front was cobbled with a sink in the centre. The double gates still stand but are part of the railings. My sister Marguerite and I were both born in 'Grasmere” and as the house became too small the family moved to 'The Limes' with our nurse Sarah Prince (Teddy) who remained with us for over forty years”.
A decade later, with Helen now aged 68 still living at Lynwood, but with no record of her tenant in the Census. The 1895 Poor Rates list still show Grasmere empty. I am not sure as to when Helen Hyde passed away, but Reginald Pavey writes : “ At the end of the century Richard Oliver bought the one-time stables and called it 'Omega' as it was the last house he intended to buy. He turned it into a dwelling-house, removed the cobblestones and altered the entrance. The thatch was removed about the same time”. This would make sense, as there are references to a coach house and the 1875 photograph shows Omega with a wide double door on the left with large gates leading up to it.
The beginning of the 20th century shows William Belcher who at just 39, is described as a retired Brewer from Burton on Trent living at Grasmere. Mary Knott, aged 40 is living with her sisters - Anne and Agnes Willis at Omega. Lynwood House is empty but by 1903 Kelly's Directory for the village show Charles Innes living there. Trustees of the Hyde family may well have still owned the properties for I located in a newspaper dated 1914 an interesting item referring to the houses. It records an Auction of Charmouth properties that included - “Grasmere” let at £30 per annum, which went for £425 and “Omega House”, let at £18 per annum which sold for £225. A directory for the same year shows: Major Hubert Innes (Omega) Mrs Susan Bush (Grasmere) Charles Alexander Innes (Lynwood House). Susan Bush was to live in the house until she died in 1949. Her father Charles lived next door until his death in 1920 and his obituary reads as follows:

Dolphin House was then bought by Arthur & Jean Davy in 1977 and in the same year the Electoral Roll for the village show Katherine Kennedy living at Grasmere and Barry & Diana Stork at Omega. Katherine had formerly lived at Fern Hill with her husband. In more recent years Omega has had its named changed to Fountain Cottage, after the ancient Inn that stood opposite and is now Charmouth House.
I wish to thank Gill Savage and Rosemary Earl for their help and enthusiasm in getting me to put down in print my findings on both their houses.
Neil Mattingly

Year
Event
1297 In this year the Abbot of Forde Abbey created a Borough. The boundary of this burgage plot can still be seen with the existing bounday walls.
1575 The property was probably sold with a number of other properties by Sir John Petre with a 2000 year lease
1641 William Balstone appears on Protestation List for Charmouth
1657 The deeds to "Stone House" refer to a little cottage on the west with stable and garden with a tenement or burgage in the tenure of A.Bolston
1757 The Poor List shows Richard Henvill, who is the Lord of the Manor owning Balsons.
1796 John Ridges first appears on land tax lists paying 3s1d for his house and 1s.10d for Thomas`s Orchard.
1797 Diana, daughter of John and Mary Ridges baptised at Charmouth Church
1807 Mary,wife of John Ridges dies
1808 John Ridges, Gentleman, appeasr in the lsit of Voters for Dorset
1812 John Ridges has 3 houses in poor rates list
1815 Diana, daughter of John Ridges marries Josiah Hyde, Surgeon of Kenilworth.
1818 He now owns 5 houses., one of which he lives in and the rest are rented out
1823 John Ridges dies
1826 Robert Kennaway Esq, is one of the tenants of Robert Knight of Axminster, who is the trustee of the late John Ridges estate.Robert is living in the property that was later to be called Omega.
1829 Robert Kennaway Esq., aged 58 died leaving his estate to his wife Sarah. He was late of Exeter and brother of Sir John Kennaway. Bart.who owned Kennaway House in Sidmouth (now an Arts Centre).
1832 Sarah Kennaway, widow of Robert is hown as renting from the trustee of John Ridges estate.
1841 Tithe Map shows it as one property (no.70) John Freeman & others owned by representatives of Francis Hyde, which should be Diana Hyde, daughter of John Ridges, who was his heiress.
1841 Census - Sarah Kennaway (Omega) Sophia Freeman(Grasmere) Elizabeth Leach (Lynwood)
1851 Census - Sarah Kennaway (Omega) Elizabeth Freeman(Grasmere) empty (Lynwood)
1855 Sarah Kennaway (Omega) dies aged 81
1861 Mary Hunt renting Grasmere, whilst Diana Hyde (aged 62) is living with her daughters in Lynwood
1871 Census - Diana Hyde (aged 72) living from her funds and a number of houses. She has 3 unmarried daughters living with her, but in 1872,Anne dies leaving Helen and Louisa to inherit her Estate.
1877 George Pavey, father of Reginald rents Grasmere from Miss Helen Hyde.
1879 Diana Hyde, heiress of John Stiles dies and her daughter Helen, aged 56,inherits most of the estate, including Grasmere and Lynwood House. Her sister Louisa, aged 60, lives at Hyde Cottage, next to The Elms, but later demolished.
1881 Census - George Pavey (Grasmere) Helen Hyde( Lynwood House).
1891 Census - Helen Hyde (Lynwood House).
1895 Helen Hyde owns a number of properties including Lynwood and Grasmere which she rents.
1900 Miss Louisa Hyde dies aged 84 she owned Wistaria and Cottage east of the elms
1901 William Belcher (Grasmere). Mary Knott(Omega). Lynwood House is empty but by 1903 Charles Innis living there.
1911 Census - Hubert Innes (Omega), Belcher (Grasmere) Lynwood House is empty
1912 Advert from Miss Innes for a servant
1914 Auction of Charmouth properties - “Grasmere” let at £30 per annum, for £425. Mr. Jackson also gave £225 for “Omega House” , let at £18 per annum
1915 Major Hubert Innes(Omega) Mrs Susan Bush (Grasmere) Charles Alexander Innes (Lynwood)
1923 Mrs Susan Bush (Grasmere) Charles Alexander Innes (Lynwood)
1932 Mrs Susan Bush (Grasmere) Charles Alexander Innes (Lynwood)
1934 the engagement is announced today between Mr. Maxwell Campbell, youngest son of Sir Charles Innes and Lady Innes, Lynwood,
1947 Advert for House Keeper by Mrs Emily Gayner, The Dolphin House instead of Lynwood.
1950 Joyce Janson (Omega)
1959 Sir Charles Innes dies
1962 Ethel Kennedy (Grasmere)
1970 Emily Gayner (Dolphin House)
1977 Arthur & Jean Davy(Dolphin House), Katherine Kennedy ( Grasmere) and Barry & Diana Stork(Omega). Frederick & Florence Loveridge are the next occupiers of Omega
  Frederick & Florence Loveridge (Omega)
1799 Land Tax showing John Ridges paying 3s1d for his house and 1s.10d for Thomas`s Orchard.
1806 Poor Rates
1812 Poor Rates
1816 Poor Rates
1818 Poor Rates
1822 Poor Rates
1823 Poor Rates
1824 Poor Rates
1825 Poor Rates
1826 Poor Rates showing Mr Robert Kennaway renting from John Knight of Axminster, who was the trustee of John Stiles Estate.
1832 Land Tax showing Mrs Sarah Kennaway(abbreviated to Kanay) renting from John Knight of Axminster, who was the trustee of John Stiles Estate.
Edward Woonton`s Will
Robert Kennaway`s Will, died 1829 aged 69, memorial in St. Andrews Church to him
Sarah Kennaway`s Will died 1855 aged 81, memorial to her in St. Andrews Church
1841 Tithe Map
1926 Ordnance Survey Map

1841 Tithe Map showing Omega, Grasmere & Dolphin House as no. 70 and the Stone House as no. 69
John Freeman and others living in no. 70. The 3 properties with 1 rood 8 perches are owned by representatives of Francis Hyde. Robert Sweeting a Surgeon is renting no. 69, The Stone House from Thomas Hunt, but interestingly it is owned by the Knights, who are also trustees for the Hydes. John Freeman is aged 74 and is living in Church Street with his wife Elizabeth in Lyme Regis in that year. Alongside it is the 1926 Map as a comparison.

The 1841 Census provides further information regarding the inhabitants of the 3 houses in the same year as the Tithe Map with Sarah Kennaway, now aged 65,living with her servants - Ann Knight and Ann Hunter at Lynwood (Dolphin House). Sophia Freeman, aged just 18 is living at Grasmere with a servant. Elizabeth Leach, aged 30, of independent means is occupying Omega House, with Mary Richards and Jane How as her servants.
John Freeman, Gentleman,appears in 1838 as one of the residents who is in a position that year to stand on a Jury.
Ten years later in 1851 Sarah Kennaway, now aged 77 described as a Widow with funds has Ann Hunter still as one of her 2 servants. Elizabeth Freeman, is th widow of John Freeman. The family are originally from Church Street in Lyme Regis. She has her owns means of income and is living with Harriet Carslake, a house servant.
In 1861 Dianna Hyde,aged 74 is living with her three unmarried daughters and is described as Owner of Houses, a number of which are in Charmouth. She is the daughter and heiress of John Stiles and late wife of Josiah Hyde who she married at Kenilworth in 1815. She is probably living at Lynwood House and renting the adjoining Grasmere House.

The Ridges - Hyde Family of Charmouth
According to Reginald Pavey, the house where John Ridges lived was to the west of Omega,probably where the Retreat and Askew House are today, he lived there until his death in 1823. When he was Church Warden in 1798, the ringers of the Church bells were given 10/6 for Nelson` s Victory of the Nile. His granddaughter,Mary Ridges Hyde, married Charles Albert Target, a French Army officer and son of Col. Jean Target, military governor of Warsaw and nephew of Guy Jean Baptiste Target, who King Louis XV`s and Queen Antoinette's solicitor and acted for her in connection with the Queen's necklace scandal. Another uncle was in the French Navy and probably died when his ship "L`Orient" blew up during the battle of the Nile, Thus Mary Ridges Hyde was connected in two ways with the battle, She died in 1872. The families of Hyde and Ridges resided and were owners of property in the village for many years. The last of the family, Louisa Hyde, died in 1900 aged 84, Her grave space had been purchased previously by Captn. Arthur Target.

This only a portion of a rather long winded Will for John Ridges who died in 1823 . I have precised it below to assist:
I John Ridges of Charmouth bequeathe unto my brother Josiah Ridges and sisters Martha and Diana Ridges £20 a piece. …Bequeathe to my daughter Diana the wife of Josiah Hyde of Kenilworth in Warwickshire, Surgeon the sum of £150…. Bequeathe unto my housekeepr Joan Roberts all my clothes and beds and £40…. bequeathe to my maid servant Hannah Roberts the sum of £15. …Bequeathe unto my friend Henry Knight of Axminster , gentlemen, the sum of £100 for looking after trusts. I give my dwelling house and premises late in possession of John Creed(died in 1818)which I hold for a long unexpired term in Charmouth to John Knight to hold in trust and insure for £500 to go to Joan Roberts and on her death to her daughter Eliza Roberts …My House in Charmouth and the house he lately purchased from the executors of late Simeon Symes(died 1820), deceased situated near the top of the village at present unoccupied. Properties in Charmouth in occupation of Mr Thomas, Mr Bedwell and Mrs Young as yearly tenants and other premises late in occupancy of Mrs Edwards as tenant. Also his dwelling house in Kenilworth lately purchased of Robert and Edward Hudson where he has recently built a valuable house. Sum of £150 to his daughter Dianna, wife of Josiah Hyde of Kenilworth , Surgeon.

A record of Charles, Samuel, Martha, Diana and Josiah Ridges who were related to John Ridges paying Powder Tax in Kenilworth in 1795
Marriage License dated 3rd October 1815 for the marriage of Diana , daughter of John Ridges to Josiah Hyde in Kenilworth, Warwickshire.
The baptism of Mary Ridges Hyde to Josiah and Diana Hyde on November 30th 1821 at St. Andrews Church in Charmouth. He is described as a Surgeon living in Kenilworth in Warwickshire. It is intersting that Sweeting, who was living next door at The Stone House was also a Surgeon.
The 1871Census shows Diana Hyde, aged 72, living from her funds and a number of houses. She has 3 daughters living with her including Helen and Louise who a decade later are shown as living in the samw property. She died in 1876, aged 79 and was buried in Charmouth Church yard. Her daughter Anne Dianna Hyde died in 1872 and there is a memorial to her in St. Andrews Church. Mary Hunt appears to be renting Lynwood from her and is described as a Lodging House Keeper.

The 1881 census reveals George Pavey, aged 46 renting Grasmere. His son Reginald was to retire young and become Charmouths great historian and in his notes he writes:
When my father came to Charmouth in 1877 with my mother and two sisters he rented   'Grasmere" , the first house on the north side of 'The Street' below 'Portland House', from Miss Hyde, with stables and coach house. The latter were converted into a laundry with a nursery upstairs. The yard in front was cobbled with a sink in the centre. The double gates still stand but are part of the railings. My sister Marguerite and I were both born in 'Grasmere” and as the house became too small the family moved to 'The Limes' with our nurse Sarah Prince (Teddy) who remained with us for over forty years.
Helen Hyde, aged (55) not 41, is living with her sister Louise, aged 58, at Lynwood ( Dolphin House).

The 1891Census detail Helen Hyde living at Lynwood House. Later in 1895 the rate list for Charmouth show her living at Lynwood (Dolphin House), but also owning the adjoining Grasmere as well a number of other properties in the village including the Beeches.
At the end of the century Richard Oliver bought the one-time stables and called it 'Omega' as it was the last house he intended to buy. He turned it into a dwelling- house, removed the cobblestones and altered the entrance. The thatch was removed about the same time. He was living at the Retreat and is described as a retired grocer aged 60 in 1891.He is described as a speculative builder who came to Charmouth in the 1870`s and built Askew House and altered the Retreat.

1901William Belcher,aged 39, is described as a retired Brewer from Burton on Trent is shown as living at Grasmere. Mary Knott, aged 40, living on her own means with her sisters and a servant occupies. Mary Knott, aged 40 is living with her sisters Anne and Agnes Willis at Omega. Lynwood House is empty but by 1903 Kelly`s Directory for the village show Charles Innis living there.

1911 Major Hubert Innes Omega ,William Robert Belcher Grasmere – Charles Alexander Innis is living at Lynwood.

Mrs. Bush lived there for many years until she died in 1949- Her father, Deputy Surgeon General Charles A. Innes. R.A.M.C. came to live next door, then called 'Lynwood'. He fought in the Crimean War and Indian Mutiny and looked forward to the centenary of Waterloo in 1915, as he hoped to wear his father's medals with his own at the Waterloo banquet. His father Lieut. Alexander Innes served at Quatre Bras and at Waterloo. It was a sad day when the banquet was cancelled owing to the war with Germany. He died in1920 aged 88. The house in former years was owned by Miss Hyde and occupied by a family called Furlong. Young Furlong was one of those who rolled the last tar barrel down The Street on Guy Fawkes night. The barrels were lighted and started at the New Inn, guided by men with poles to keep them in the centre of the road, the surface of which was composed of loose flints, and finished at the "Coach and Horses" in a glorious blare.

In 1915 Major Hubert Innes -Omega ,Mrs Susan Bush is now living in Grasmere – Charles Alexander Innis is living at Lynwood.The 1923 Rates list show Susan continueing to live at Grasmere. In 1932 Kelly`s Directory shows that both Mrs Bush and Sir Charles Alexander Innes continue to live in the same properties. In 1950 Joyce Janson is at Omega. In 1962 Ethel Kennedy is at Grasmere.


In the year 1910 Emily Bertha Gayner is living at Dolphin House. She is born in Cambridge in 1886 - the daughter of Charles, F.R.S. and Caroline Emily Bertha Heycock and marries Dr Gayner in 1907, she was the sister of Olive Heycock who married Douglas Pass and lived at Wootton Fitzpaine Manor. she had 5 children. She died in Aldeburgh in 1975 aged 89. The 1911 Census shows her, aged 26,recently married living with her parents. Her sister, Katheinre is aged 21 and in due course marries the wealthy Douglas Pass of Wootton Fitzpaine Manor.

This is an abstract from "Memorials of Life at Wootton"by Philippa Hill, daughter of Douglas Pass.

" Another special person much loved at Wootton, was Aunt B. Visits to her home at Dolphin House were very exciting with so many stairs going up and up and the cuckoo clock with its long pendulum hanging so far down. I stayed there once along with Aunt B's granddaughter Caroline and I don't remember much except picking plums, which I think we reached climbing up the wall, so they may well have been in the neighbour's garden! I think that that was also the holiday that we used the old lookout hut as our changing hut at the beach and it is of course still there".  

Dolphin House was then bought by Arthur & Jean Davy in 1977 and in the same year Katherine Kennedy is living at Grasmere and Barry & Diana Stork at Omega. Frederick & Florence Loveridge are the next occupiers of Omega

Charles Alexander Innes Born December 14, 1831 in Bruges, Belgium, Died March 17, 1920 in Charmouth. The following inforamtion was found about him:
Assistant Surgeon 52nd Regiment 1855, Staff 1860, 16th Dragoons 1861, Staff Surgeon 1868, 16th Lancers 1868, Surgeon Major Army Medical department 1868, Brigade Surgeon 1881. Retired on half pay with honorary rank of Deputy Surgeon General 1881. Crimea. Indian Mutiny. Alumnus King's College Aberdeen 1847-1849. MD 1855. After retirement was Medical Officer to HM Prisons Hull, Coldbath Fields and Pentonville.
George Pavey writes:
Deputy Surgeon General Charles A. Innes. R.A.M.C. came to live next door, then called 'Lynwood'. He fought in the Crimean War and Indian Mutiny and looked forward to the centenary of Waterloo in 1915, as he hoped to wear his father's medals with his own at the Waterloo banquet. His father Lieut. Alexander Innes served at Quatre Bras and at Waterloo. It was a sad day when the banquet was cancelled owing to the war with Germany. He died in1920 aged 88.

Sir Charles Alexander Innes ,KCSI,CIE (1874–1959) served as Governor of Burma from December 1927 to December 1932. He received the Companion in The Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire in 1921 and the KCSI (Knight Commander of the Order of the Star of India)

Charmouth - On Christmas Eve, Mrs R. Kennaway of this place, agreeably to a custom she has observed for a considerable number of years, distributed among the poor families of Charmouth and neighbourhood, thirty six score of excellent heifer beef. This benevolent lady has long been a liberal and constant subscriber to various schools, and the instruction of poor children. At this inclement season, she also provides for many needy family bed and other clothes. 1st December 1853

The engagement is announced today between Mr. Maxwell Campbell, youngest son of Sir Charles Innes and Lady Innes, Lynwood, Charmouth, Dorset, and Kathleen Mary, younger daughter of the late Sheriff William Harvey and Mrs. Harvey, of Gloucester Road, Regents Park. Sir Charles was for 5 years Governor of Burma. Gloucester Echo 4th July 1934

Death of a Crimean and Indian Mutiny Veteran – The death occurred recently at Lynwood, Charmouth of Deputy – Surgeon C.A. Innes, M.D., A.M.D. (retired), in his 8 th year. Dr. Innes was present at the siege and capture of Sebastopol in 1855, receiving the medal with clasp and the Turkish medal. In 1856 he joined the 52 nd (Oxford) Light Infantry, and proceeded with them to India and as present at the siege and assault of Delhi, his regiment furnishing the storming party of the Kashmir Gate. He received the medal and was promoted in recognition of his services. He also served for many years with the 16 th (Queen's) Lancers. He was the surviving son of Lieutenant Alexander Innes, 42 nd Highlanders (Black watch). M.K.W. who fought at the battle of Quatre Bras and Waterloo. 2nd April 1920

 
 

To close a trust estate, Mesrs. Heath Bros., of Bedford Circus, Exeter, conducted a successful sale of freehold residences at the "Coach and Horses" Hotel, Charmouth,, yesterday, “Melbourne House” , with a large gardens, let at £27 per annum, was sold to Mr. Linsoll for £402, and “Grasmere” with garden back and front, let at £30 per annum, was secured by Mr. Jackson, solicitor, of Exeter, on behalf of a client for £425. Mr. Jackson also gave £225 for “Omega House” , let at £18 per annum; and “The Retreat” , with large garden back and front, let at £16 per annum went to Mr. Clarke for £300. Western Times, 20th March 1914.

1901 Ordnance Survey Map showing Omega, Grasmere & Dolphin House and the Stone House to the east
Aerial Photograph taken in 1928 of group of buildings set back with Omega covered with Ivy
Aerial Photgraph taken in 1950`s showing the rear of the group of buildings, with their boundaries marked by the original monastic wall to their north.
Omega, Grasmere & Dolphin House in 1875
Omega, Grasmere & Dolphin House today
Lucy Rossetti, née Madox Brown (1843-1894) painted this watercolour of Charmouth in 1879. On the left is the entrance door of Portland House. By the large watering can was a water tap in a recess, for the use of people whose houses did not contain a well.
The garden of Omega, Grasmere and Dolphin House can be glimpsed behind the wall and iron railings. The building next to these is Stone House, all of which stand on The Street.
Omega today
Grasmere. The Street. Charmouth
Dolphin House. The Street. Charmouth today