Fernhill
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Fernhillc.1900
The same view today. The pretty carved gabled front has been simplified and altered over time as can be seen below.
 
 
 
1885 Ordnance Survey Map on the left compared with that of today.

Fernhill House stands today as a hotel set back from the road that leads to Lyme Regis on the western fringe of Charmouth. The earliest section of this house dates from 1845, but the land it sits on can be traced back even further to when Charmouth was owned by the Monks of Forde Abbey in the 13th century. It formed part of the area known as Langmoor, which according to A.D. Mills -“Place Names of Dorset” derived from “Long Moor or Marshy Ground”. The earliest reference is in the Forde Cartulary, where it is written as “Langmoreshegh”. In 1295 The Abbott of Forde wished to create a Borough in Charmouth and described the boundaries which included the following: Grant also that every burgess may keep a draught animal in the common pasture, namely from the road adjoining the moor of Geoffrey Heron (Heyrun) extending west to the land of Stephen Pain (Payn) and along the bounds of Stephen's land as far as the ditch on the land formerly of Robert Russell (Rosel) and from this ditch up to Langmoresgeth”. 
After the dissolution of the Abbey at Forde in 1539, most of Charmouth was owned for many centuries by the Lord of the Manor. The first of these was Sir William Petre who carried out a comprehensive Survey of the village in 1564. It was his son, John who sold a number of properties in Charmouth and the balance of the Manor was bought by William Pole of Shute, near Axminster in 1575. It was no doubt at this time that the field was bought by Edward Mabell according to a later document. It relates as follows:” all that piece of ground formerly enclosed by Edward Mabel of about 3 acres converted into an orchard lying at Langmoor”.  It then goes on to record that it was his Edward`s daughters – Elizabeth and Thomasin Mabell who inherited it and in turn sold it to Thomas Rose Esq. The 1664 Hearth Tax shows Edward owning one of the larger properties in the village with 3 chimneys. The parish records show that he was born in 1630 in Charmouth, Dorset. One of his daughters Joane (born in 1655) married Rev. Joseph Bragg, Rector of Charmouth in 1673.  The subsequent owner of Fernhill was the wealthy, Thomas Rose (1679-1747) who was Sheriff of Dorset in 1714 and lived at the Manor in Wootton Fitzpaine. On his death the orchard that was to become Fernhill at Langmoor was bought by Jacob Burrow, a Blacksmith. At the same time, he also bought a house on the site where 1-3 Hillside were later to be built. The Poor Rates for 1754 show him paying 3d. for his own house and Trevats(?) and 6d. separately for Langmoor. His brother, Samuel Burrow is paying 3 1/2d for Parsons Estate (The Elms), 4d. for Watterses, Hodders (Rose and Crown) and the George. He was also paying 21/4d for his own house, Burgage and Langmoor. To pay for all these properties he borrows £320 from Water Oke, a wealthy Attorney, living at Axmouth.  In 1757 Jacob Burrow sells Fernhill Orchard to his brother for £60. The deed for this has survived with other related documents in the Dorset Archives and it is described as “being of about 3 acres” – an area it was to remain through the centuries. Unfortunately, Samuel Burrows overstretches his finances and has to sell his estate to Walter Oke for just £400 in 1760
It would appear a bargain was had by Walter, but he would not enjoy them for long as he died just 3 years later. His wife, Frances (1711-1806) continued to own property in Charmouth. Elizabeth Farr (died 1804), was the only child and heiress of Jacob (died 1774) and Elizabeth Burrows (died1800). The Burrows and Farrs lived where 1-3 Hillside is today and Barrs Lane should be Farrs Lane leading from The Street to fields at the rear of it.
A Survey taken of the village in 1783 is very comprehensive and describes Langmoor Orchard as being valued at £6-17-6d and of 2 acres 3 roods 32 perches and belonging to Frances Oke, The same survey has Edward Farr, House & Orchard, late Burrows (£4-0-0d) 0a 3p 15r. 1805 Poor Rates show Mrs Okes owning a number of fields including the field at Langmoor. Her son in law, Thomas Shute is renting them from her. He is living in “Manns Tenement”. Now “The Elms” The orchard on which Fernhill was to be eventually built is always referred to as Farrs Orchard, even though it was not owned by them. They no doubt rented it from Frances Oke as they also owned adjoining fields in Langmoor.
Before Thomas Shute died in 1814 he added an addition to his Will as follows:
Whereas since the making and the publication of my last Will and Testament in writing bearing the thirtieth day of June 1803, I have purchased all that one piece of meadow ground formerly purchased by one Edward Mabell deceased containing by estimation 3 acres or thereabouts more or less formerly an orchard lying at Langmoor and adjoined to the lands formerly of John Burridge Esq situate lying and being within the Parish of Charmouy aforesaid late the estate of Mrs Frances Oke of Pinney, deceased now I do herby give and devise all and singular The said Lands and hereditaments with the tents issues and profits Theron unto my Wife Frances Shute and heirs. Witnesses George Smith of Axminster, Attorney at Law, Priscilla Powell, John Edwards, servants to the said Thomas Shute. Proved 1814.
It would seem that the piece of meadow was Farrs Orchard and the Land Tax records show him and later on his death, his wife Frances Shute as owners, until she died in 1824. There is a fine marble memorial in St. Andrews Church to them.Their Estate was inherited by their daughter, Rebecca who was married to the Rev. Samuel Axford, It was Septimus Smith, a cousin who was the next owner of the orchard and in due course he sold it to Rev. Richard John Marker, Rector of Uffculme. There is a record of this gentleman giving a substantial amount to the rebuilding of St. Andrews Church in Charmouth in 1836. The famous historian, Reginald Pavey writes:
Mr. and Mrs Marker derived so much benefit to their health by living there that at their death they left it to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners to form a trust for some local charity. The rent was to be applied annually in supplying blankets and clothing to the old and infirm poor, who were not in receipt of parochial benefit, and was called "The Poor or Marker Charity". The trustees readily secured suitable tenants. By a deed bearing date 22nd August 1837; conveyed to certain trustees a close of land. Thus, the property was not sold but passed from one tenant to another.
The 1841 Census shows Richard Marker, aged 79, of independent means living in Charmouth in that year. The Tithe Map of the same year describes the piece of land as no.126 - Farrs Orchard - 2 acres 1 rood 27 perches owned by Markers Charity and rented to local butcher and farmer, John Hodges. There is no mention of a house yet on the field. It would seem that it was to be built in 1845, judging from a later lease that mentions when it began from. The likely tenant who went to the considerable expense of erecting a substantial house on the site was the wealthy heiress, Miss Ellen Maryatt, then aged only 30. She was given a 50-year lease with a ground rent of just twelve pound a year, which would have been paid to the Charity. She did not live there initially but sublet it. The first record we have is from the 1851 Census which shows that Reverend Samuel Carr (1791-1854) was staying there at that time. He was Vicar of St Peter's, Colchester and came with five daughters and a number of servants. He was only there briefly as by the end of the year Mr. James Harrison and his wife had moved in. He added to the house now known as Fernhill, at his own expense, the billiard room and two bedrooms above it. W.D. Lang, Keeper of The Natural History Museum, who lived in Charmouth wrote of him as follows:
JAMES Harrison was born at Purley on the 6th February 1819. He was a student at St. George's Hospital, but was not strong enough to pursue a medical career, and gave it up, coming with his sisters to live at Charmouth in 1851. There he met Miss E. M. Ludlam whom he married in 1851, and lived at Fernhill which he rented from Miss Marryat, sister of Captain Marryat, the novelist. From Fernhill he moved to No. 3 Hillside. At Charmouth he collected the fossils of the district, and from time to time corresponded about them with the pioneer palaeontologists. The letters written to him by these scientists were carefully kept, and late in 1937 were presented to Lyme Regis Museum by his younger daughter, Miss Mary Harrison, together with some of the fossil specimens of his collection, some published works on geology by H. T. De la Beche and others, and a sum of £20. He is best known as the discoverer of the earliest British dinosaur, which was named after him by Sir Richard Owen, Scelidosaurus harrisoni.
During his life at Charmouth, James Harrison suffered ill-health, and died there on the 9th September, 1864
His daughter writes of him: " He was tall and good looking, but when I remember him he was nearly always in bed. Next to fossils, his great interest was in the garden. We had a nice walled one at the back of the house in which he grew almost every kind of fruit, and it flourished there." He is buried in the churchyard at Monkton Wyld. The grave lies to the south-west of the church, and is marked by a flat stone slab surrounded by a curb and inscribed on one side, " In Memory of James Harrison," and on the other, " Born at Purley, Feb 6, 1819. Died at Charmouth Sept 9,1864 " A yew-tree stands at the head of the grave. He left two daughters, born in 1852 and 1854, respectively.
During the 1850s, he found fossils from the cliffs of Black Ven between Charmouth and Lyme Regis, that were quarried, possibly for raw material for the manufacture of cement. Some of these he gave to the collector and retired general surgeon Henry Norris.
In September 1855 James Harrison moved to 3 Hillside in Charmouth, and Fernhill was auctioned. The details of the house at that time are as follows:
Mr. Marsh has received instructions to sell by Auction at The Mary, London, on Thursday, October 11th, at twelve (unless previously disposed of by private contract), - the detached and modern residence distinguished Fern-Hill House, most delightfully situate in the much-admired village of Charmouth, sheltered by noble hills, in the midst of most beautiful Woodland scenery, commanding an uninterrupted view of the adjacent Country and the sea. The house, which is most substantial built on the Villa style, contains seven principal and secondary bedrooms, dining, drawing room, and library, and all requisite domestic offices, coach house, sailing, and other outbuildings, a capital kitchen garden well supplied with water, sloping lawn, with green house, and small paddock, extending in all to Bout three acres. The Property is held for an unexpired term of 50 years, from the 29th September, 1846, at the nominal ground tent of £12 per annum. May be viewed on application to Mr. Carter, at the Post-Office, Charmouth, and particulars, with conditions of sale, obtained of Messrs, White, Broughton, and White, solicitors, Great Marlborough Street, Regent Street, also of Mrs Carter and at the Coach and Horses, Charmouth. 29th September 1855. - Salisbury and Winchester Journal.
It may well have not sold as Miss Marryatt is shown as living there. Ellen Marryat, youngest of fifteen children of Joseph and Charlotte Marryat, the wealthy owners of Wimbledon House, Parkside. Lame and very serious, she stayed at home as companion to her widowed mother and nursed her famous brother, Captain Frederick the novelist, in his last illness. On her mother’s death in 1854, she moved to Charmouth in Dorset and opened a small school. One of her pupils was Annie Wood (later Besant), Freethinker and Theosophist, who later remembered Ellen’s genius for teaching and great beneficence to the neighbours. Ellen was to die in 1901 aged 91 and was buried in the family tomb next to St. Mary’s Church, Wimbledon. Annie Besant (1847-1933), an estranged Anglican priest's wife, who had rejected Christianity and become a free thinker, and eventually a theosophist, was one of the most remarkable British women of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. A gifted public speaker and prolific writer, she campaigned for free thought, birth control, improved education, and women’s rights.
1861 Census has Ellen Marryatt, aged 46 as head of the house at Fernhill. By 1868 Captain Munro of Fernhill is mentioned in a newspaper as the new tenant. He was the second son of Sir Thomas Munro, an Anglo-Indian soldier of great distinction, who became Governor of Madras in 1820, was made a baronet in 1825, and died while still Governor, in 1827. Campbell Munro also began life as a soldier. After retiring from the Army, he came to live at Fernhill, and Fairfield in Lyme Regis was not his home till 1879, and then only from time to time. He succeeded his brother in the baronetcy in 1901 and died in 1913.He was the father of a family of nine and built at his own expense the nursery wing. When he left Fernhill in 1879, his contents and furnishings were auctioned.
The 1881 Census has Major General John Eliot, aged 60 living at Fernhill.1885 General Eliot, who offered to buy the house for £750, is advertising for a groom. The following year he dies aged 65.1888 Marriage of Miss White, only child of Rev. W.H. White, rector of Catherston with Henry John, third son of the late Major General Eliot, R.S. of Fernhill. The same year Miss Elliot auctions contents of Fernhill.
1891 Census has Lionel Smith Gordon, aged 58 living at Fernhill.1895 Marriage of Dr. Barnes of Castle Hill House, Axminster to Charlotte, second living daughter of Sir Lionel Smith Gordon, Fernhill , Charmouth. Lionel Smith fought in the Crimean War. He gained the rank of Captain in the 71st Light Infantry. He fought in the Indian Mutiny.
1898 E.H. Wallis of Fernhill mentioned in local paper.
During the latter part of the century the house fell into great disrepair and the trustees, Capt. Bullen and Dr.Norris, were anxious to sell But the Charity Commissioners refused to allow this, as they did not regard £750 an advantageous transaction for the Charity. The last tenant was Sir Lionel Smith Gordon, and when he left the trustees were allowed to sell for a smaller sum to a purchaser, who resold it a few weeks later, to Mr, Kennedy, making a profit of £300.The sanitation was primitive and the kitchen chimney ran horizontally the full length of the house and was cleaned by a cannon ball Mr, Kennedy spent a great deal in bringing the house up to the most modern requirements, The right of way through the property was exchanged for a portion of the field adjacent to Langmoor by the owner of that property. Mrs. Kennedy left in 1950 and the house became a hotel.
1901 Census showing John Kennedy, aged 53, retired School master living at Fernhill
1907 Wedding of the Rev. John Kennedy of Fernhill, Charmouth, to Ethel Mary, elder daughter of John Maitland Reid, of Fountain Mead, Charmouth
1911 Census for Fernhill has John Kennedy, aged 63 living at Fernhill.
1912 Mr. John Kennedy accidently kills Farmers son.
1931 John Kennedy dies
1946 Mrs Isabel Reid of Fernhill House, Charmouth died aged 91, widow of John Maitland Reid, left her property to her children Arthur Reid and Ethel Kennedy.
1950 Mrs. Kennedy left in 1950 and the house became a hotel
Electoral Roll for each year only gives occupiers, a number of these may well have just been managing the hotel, which would explain, the long list of names.
1951 Hebe and Annie Lang,
1952 Henry and Margaret Carmichael,
1953 Henry and Emily Wickham,
1957 Percy and Elizabeth Colby,
1958 Anne Gove,
1961 Hugh and Sarah Mace,
1964 Dennis and Betty Dungey,
1965 Duncan & Joan Mackinnon,
1971 – 1980 Charles and Valerie Batley
1980-1985 Stewart Fleming running Fernhill Hotel and the Batleys, the previous owners at Fernhill Bungalow.
1985-1990Trevor, Susan and Sandra Lloyd, Tony and Sally Pawson and Emma LLoyd running Fernhill Hotel
1990-1995 Terence and Debra Bridges are running Fernhill Hotel
1995-2005 Browen Cound, Anne, Jayne,John and Julia Hancock running Ferrnhill Hotel
2007- to date Joanne and Robert Illingworth

  piece of ground earlier enclosed by Edward Mabel of about 3 acres converted into an orchard lying at Langmoor
  Jacob Burrow purchased with other lands from Elizabeth Mabel and Thomasin Mabell, spinsters and daughters of Edward Mabell,
1753 Field sold by Jacob Burrow, blacksmith to Samuel Burrow, his brother, also a Blacksmith - who purchased it for £64.
1760 Samuel Burrow sold it, with other properties in Charmouth, for £400 to Walter Oke of Axmouth. Farr was son-in-law of Samuel Burrow
1783 Missing Map for this year has in its record book as no. 95.Frances Oke, Langmoor Orchard (£6-17-6d) 2a 3r 32p
1805 Thomas Shute purchases field and other property from his mother in law-Frances Oke.
  Sept Smith, nephew of Thomas Shute sold it to R.J. Marker
1837 The site of the house was owned by Mr. Richard John Marker, In 1837 he left it to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners to form a trust for "The Poor or Marker Charity"
1841 Richard Marker (1768-1855), aged 79 of Independent Means living at Charmouth with his servant, Mary Wyatt, who later appeasr as a beneficiary in his will.
1841 Lot 126 - Farrs Orchard - 2 acres 1 rood 27perches Markers Charity rented by John Hodges in 1841.
1851 Mr. James Harrison and his wife
1845 Original House built by Miss Ellen Marryat (aged 30) with 50 year lease with a ground rent of just £12 a year.
1851 Rev Carr staying at Fernhill at the time of the Census in that year.
1852 Wife of James Harrison of Fernhill is recorded as having a daughter.
1854 James Harrison of Fernhill
1855 Fernhill is auctioned with an unexpired lease of 50 years from 1845 at a ground rent of 12l. Per annum.
1859 Miss Marryat, sister of Capt. Marryat the novelist, is shown as living there in local paper.
1861 Census has Ellen Marryatt, aged 46 as head of the house at Fernhill
1868 Captain Munro of Fernhill mentioned in paper.
1871 Census shows Campbell Munro, aged 47 living at Fernhill.
1872 The wife of Sir Campbell Munro, who built the nursery wing, is reported to have had a daughter.
1879 Captain Munro is shown as leaving and his furnishings are auctioned.
1881 Census has John Eliot, aged 60 living at Fernhill
1885 General Eliot, who offered to buy the house for £750, is advertising for a groom.
1886 Eliot dies aged 65
1888 Marriage of Miss White, only child of Rev. W.H. White, rector of Catherston with Henry John, third son of the late Major General Eliot, R.S. of Fernhill
1888 Miss Elliot auctions contents of Fernhill.
1891 Census has Lionel Smith Gordon, aged 58 living at Fernhill
1895 Marriage of Dr. Barnes of Castle Hill House, Axminster to Charlotte, second living daughter of Sir Lionel Smith Gordon,Fernhill , Charmouth
  Loionel Smith fought in the Crimean War.2.He gained the rank of Captain in the 71st Light Infantry.2He fought in the Indian Mutiny.
1898 E.H. Wallis of Fernhill mentioned in local paper. He sells it to John Kennedy in that year.the trustees were allowed to sell for a smaller sum to a purchaser, who resold it a few weeks later, to Mr. Kennedy, making a profit of £300.
1901 Census showing Rev. John Kennedy, aged 53, retired School master living at Fernhill
1907 Wedding of the Rev. John Kennedy of Fernhill, Charmouth, to Ethel Mary, elder daughter of John Maitland Reid, of Fountain Mead, Charmouth
1911 Census for Fernhill has John Kennedy, aged 63 living at Fernhill
1912 Mr. John Kennedy accidently kills Farmers son
1920 Rev. John Kennedy of Fernhill, mentioned in Court case.
1933 Mrs. Kennedy of Fernhill advertising for a House maid.
1937 John Reid Kennedy, son, in an accident with his car.
1946 Mrs Isabel Reid of Fernhill House, Charmouth died aged 91, widow of John Maitland Reid, left her property to her children Arthur Reid and Ethel Kennedy.
1950 Mrs. Kennedy left in 1950 to live at Grasmere, where a relation Mrs. Heycock was living at Dolphin House.
1951 Hebe and Annie Lang at Fernhill House.
1952 Henry and Margaret Carmichael at Fernhill House which becomes a hotel.
1953 Henry and Emily Wickham at Fernhill House.
1957 Percy and Elizabeth Colby at Fernhill House they sold house at Auction in that year.
1958 Anne Gove at Fernhill House
1961 Hugh and Sarah Mace running Fernhill Hotel
1964 Dennis and Betty Dungey running Fernhill Hotel
1965 Duncan & Joan Mackinnon running Fernhill Hotel
1971 Charles and Valerie Batley running Fernhill Hotel
1980 Batleys sell to Stewart Fleming
1985 Electoral Roll shows Stewart Fleming running Fernhill Hotel and the Batleys, the previous owners at Fernhill Bungalow.
1990 Electoral Roll shows Trevor, Susan and Sandra Lloyd, Tony and Sally Pawson and Emma LLoyd running Fernhill Hotel
1995 Electoral Rolls shows Terence and Debra Bridges are running Fernhill Hotel
2000 Electoral Rolls shows Terence and Debra Bridges are running Fernhill Hotel
2005 Electoral Roll shows Browen Cound, Anne, Jayne,John and Julia Hancock running Ferrnhill Hotel
2007 to date - Joanne and Robert Illingworth
   
The place names of Dorset by A.D. Mills has the above references for Langmoor. It would seem that the earlist reference is in 1251(Forde Cartulary)where it is referred to as Langmoreshegh. Another reference by Hutchins in his history of Dorset has it as Langesmores geth. The name derives from "long moor or marshy ground". Several springs are marked nearby.
The original Deed for Fernhill in 1753, when Samuel Burrow bought it from his brother Jacob for £60
This Indenture dated 1753 between Jacob Burrow, otherwise Burrows of Charmouth, Blacksmith of the one part and Samuel Burrow of the same place, Blacksmith of the other part witnessed that the said Jacob Burrow in the consideration of £60 to him in hand paid by The said Samuel Burrow...... the Ground formerly enclosed by Edward Mabell, deceased and containing by estimation 3 acres or thereabouts, which is now and for several years last past has been converted into an orchard lying at Langmoor and adjoining to the lands formerly of John Burridge Esq. purchased by the said Jacob Burrow with other lands of Thomas Rose, Esq. who purchased the same with other lands from Elizabeth Mabell and Thomasine Mabell, spinsters, daughters and coheirs of Edward Mabell who was brother and heir of John Mabell deceased.Signed Jacob Burrow. Signed in presence of Francis Randall and Robert Luckert
PORTRAIT OF THOMAS ROSE OF WOOTTON FITZPAINE, DORSET(1679-1747)Half length, wearing a grey coat and long wig. The Roses were originally merchants at Lyme Regis.Thomas Rose (1679-1747) was sherrif of Dorset in 1714. He left an only daughter. Mary, who married Francis Drewe, Esq. This estate afterards came to Thomas Rose Drewe. second son of Francis Drewe, who resided in Wootton Fitzpaine until his death in 1815.
In 1760 Samuel Burrow sold to Walter Oke of Axmouth, gentleman,for £400, "all that piece of ground" mentioned above and also that other orchard, common burgess or "acre of ground" formerly in Tenure of George Coins also that Tenement called "Manns Tenement" consisting of a dwelling house, two gardens , an orchard. "Two fields of Meadow and one field of pasture" for the residue of 2000 years which commenced 27th April 1573 and also that Tenement or Inn called "The George Inn" with the Curtlage, garden orchard and backside for the residue of 1000 years which commenced 25th March 1703.Also all that messuage known by the name of "The Rose and Crown" with the curtelage, garn and orchard for the residue of another term of  years which commenced on 29th November 1725 and also that other messuage wherein Samuel Burrow now lives for the residue of 1900 years which commenced 10thApril 1599". 
6 Pieces of land were sold by Samuel Burrow to Walter Oke for £400 
The 1810 Ordnance Survey for Charmouth showing Langmoor to the north west of the village and open fields to the south of the Street.
The site of the house was owned by Mr. Richard John Marker in 1837. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the site, which consisted of about 3 acres, enclosed by Edward Mabell, was owned by several people, among whom was Samuel Burrow - a Blacksmith - who purchased it for £64. In 1760 he sold it, with other properties in Charmouth, for £400 to Walter Oke of Axmouth. It passed eventually to Sept Smith who sold it to R .S. Marker, when it was called Farr's Orchard. (Farr was son-in-law of Samuel Burrow).There was a quit rent of 6d payable annually to the Lord of the Manor, and a right of way or passage across the land was claimed by the Rev. Brian Combe, curate in charge of the parish. Mr. and Mrs Marker derived so much benefit to their health by living there that at their death they left it to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners to form a trust for some local charity. The rent was to be applied annually in supplying blankets and clothing to the old and infirm poor, who were not in receipt of parochial benefit, and was called "The Poor or Marker Charity". The trustees readily secured suitable tenants. At one time it was occupied by Miss Marryat, sister of Capt. Marryat the novelist, who had a girls school; one of her pupils being Ann Besant. She let the house to Mr. James Harrison and his wife in about 1851. Mr Harrison, although suffering from ill health, was a collector of fossils and is famous for his discovery of the earliest British dinosaur, which was named after him by Sir Richard Owen, Scelidosaurus harrisoni. From Fernhill he moved to No. 3 Hillside, Charmouth, where he died in 1864.
A later tenant was Sir Campbell Munro, who built the nursery wing. He was followed by General Eliot, who offered to buy the house for £750. During the latter part of the century the house fell into great disrepair and the trustees, Capt. Bullen and Dr.Norris, were anxious to sell But the Charity Commissioners refused to allow this, as they did not regard £750 an advantageous transaction for the Charity. The last tenant was Sir Lionel Smith Gordon, and when he left the trustees were allowed to sell for a smaller sum to a purchaser, who resold it a few weeks later, to Mr, Kennedy, making a profit of £300.The sanitation was primitive and the kitchen chimney ran horizontally the full length of the house and was cleaned by a cannon ball Mr, Kennedy spent a great deal in bringing the house up to the most modern requirements, The right of way through the property was exchanged for a portion of the field adjacent to Langmoor by the owner of that property. Mrs. Kennedy left in 1950 and the house became a hotel. The houses opposite are in Monkton Wyld parish.

Fernhill deeds 1753 sold by Jacob Burrow, blacksmith to Samuel Burrow, blacksmith for £60 all that piece of ground for,early enclosed by Edward Mabel. Of about 3 acres converted into an orchard lying at Langmoor and adjoining lands formerly of John Burridge, esq. lately purchased by Jacob Burrow with other lands of Thomas Rose,esq( possibly Hillside) who purchased with other lands from Elizabeth Mabel. And Thomasin Mabell, spinsters and daughters of Edward Mabell, who was brother of John Mabell deceased.

1783 Map Record Book :Long Leaseholds
94.Edward Farr, House & Orchard, late Burrows (£4-0-0d) 0a 3p 15r
95.Francis Oke, Langmoor Orchard (£6-17-6d) 2a 3r 32p (Fernhill Site)

1805 Poor Rates show Mrs Okes owning a number of fields including the field at Langmoor. Her son in law, Thomas Shute is renting them from her.
 
Family Tree for the Shutes showing how they were related to the Okes and Smiths.
1807 Poor Rates show Thomas Shute renting fields from Executors of Mrs Frances Oke.
1808 Land Tax shows Thomas Shute with his properties
1824 Poor Rates shows Mrs. Shute with Houses, fields
1826 Land Tax shows Reverend Samuel Alford, husband of Rebecca, daughter of Thomas and Frances Shute as renting The Elms to Richard Hawkins and Farrs Orchard, later to be where Fernhill was to be built as valued at 1s 5d.
The Elms, where the Shutes lived in Charmouth, now the Parish Council Offices.
The Memorial to Thomas and Frances Shute in St. Andrews Church, Charmouth
A codicil to be added and to be part of the last will and Testament of Thomas Shute of Charmouth in the County of Dorset.
Whereas since the making and the publication of my last Will and Testament in writing bearing the thirtieth day of June 1803, I have purchased all that one piece of meadow ground formerly purchased by one Edward Mabell deceased containing by estimation 3 acres or thereabouts more or less formerly an orchard lying at Langmoor and adjoined to the lands formerly of John Burridge Esq and also all that Orchard formerly commonly reputed a Burgesss or piece of ground and in the tenure of one George Comins and William Comins deceased and afterwards of Clement Joyner all which said premises are now in my occupation and are situate lying and being within the Parish of Charmouy aforesaid late the estate of Mrs. frances Oke of Pinney, decsaed now I do herby give and devise all and singular The said Lands and hereditaments with the tents issues and profits Theron unto my Wife Frances Shute and heirs. Witnesses George Smith of Axminster, Attorney at Law, PriscLla Powell, John Edwards, servants to The said Thomas Shute. Proved 1814
Frances Shute Will 1824
Piece of meadow enclosed by Edward Mabell containing 3 acres formerly an orchard at Langmoor formerly of John Burridge in my occupation.
Dwelling house which was purchased by late husband Thomas Shute of Samuel Paul and 3 acres behind the house which husband purchased off executors of Mrs.. Oke in my occupation into Henry Alford and Benjaimn Cleave of Crediton.
Plate, furniture etc to daughter Rebecca Alford. 1824 Rebecca Alford wife of Rev. Samuel Alford.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Lot 126 - Farrs Orchard - 2 acres 1 rood 27perches Markers Charity rented by John Hodges in 1841. No sign of Fern Hill being built on the site.
1887
1903
1926

https://archive.org/details/fernsofaxeitstri00edwa_0

 

The ferns of the Axe and its tributaries : also of Lyme, Charmouth, Uplyme, and Monkton Wyld, with an account of the flower lobelia urens, found wild near Axminster, and nowhere else in Great Britainby Edwards, Zachary James published in 1866


James Moly, who bequeathed the paintings to RAMM in 1910, was born c.1826 in Hawkchurch, Dorset. He was a draper and druggist in Hawkchurch, taking over a drapery and grocery business that had been run by his parents. By 1881 he had retired from the business and was living on “income from real and personal property” according to the occupational detail of the census of that year. His address was given as Longmoor (near the Axminster Road) Charmouth. By 1901 the address was Longmoor House. The inscription on the paintings gives the address as Ringmoor Manor. The details indicate that the writer knew something of the family history and wanted it recorded. There are records of the Moly or Moley family in Hawkchurch back to the 1780s.

By the time that a special R.H.S. Exhibition of British Ferns was held in London in August 1892 more of the pioneers had died. The Schedule for the latter described "Special Medal Prizes offered by British Fern Growers to Amateurs of the United Kingdom for specimens of the best varieties of British species, with the object of creating a greater interest in our native Ferns".

There were sixteen classes for collections and other prizes for best individual specimens. The prizes for the first four of the classes were given in memory of South West Pteridologists and the fifth also came from the South West. These five were as follows:

Class A - Colonel A.M. Jones's Memorial Prize for 10 plumose varieties (no restriction of species). Given by his daughters and Captain Stafford Jones. Silver Gilt Flora Medal. [Colonel Jones of Clifton, Bristol had died in 1889]

Class B - Mr Edwin Fydell Fox's Memorial Prize for 10 cruciate or narrow varieties (no restriction of species). Given by his sons, Dr E. Churchill Fox, and his brother, Mr G.F. Fox. Silver Gilt Flora Medal. [Mr Fox of Brislington, near Bristol had died in 1891].

Class C - Mrs Maria Grant's Memorial Prize for 10 varieties of Athyrium filix-femina. Given by her son, Mr W.J.A. Grant. Silver Gilt Flora Medal. [Mrs Grant of Hillersdon House, Devon had died in 1891].

Class D - Mr William Charles Carbonell's Memorial Prize for 10 varieties of Polystichum aculeatum and hybrids with P. aculeatum. Given by "the Family". Silver Gilt Flora Medal. [Mr Carbonell of Usk, Monmouthshire had died c.1889].

Class E - 16 varieties (no restriction of species). Given by the Clifton Zoological Gardens, Mr E. J. Lowe F.R.S., and Major Cowburn F.R.H.S. First Prize, Silver Gilt Flora Medal. [A major part of the Jones and Fox Collections had been given for display at Clifton Zoological Gardens. Major Cowburn died before the show took place].

Among the prizes for best individual specimens, Mr James Moly of Charmouth, Dorset gave a Bronze Flora Medal for the Best specimen of a variegated or golden variety. Edward Lowe won these and most of the other classes (Lowe, 1895) but most of the 'competition' had 'passed on'.


 
 
R.S.Marker Esq, Uffflence, mr Wellington, Devon.
Alford to yourself
We return you their payment for ... and am sorry we have delayed it for so long. It has been in Mr. Septimius Smiths hands for approval on behalf of his niece. We enclose your extract from the Wills of George Smith and his daughter as supplied now by Mr. Septimius Smith. Are obliged by your .. relative to Miss Smiths executric of the conveyance - we of course undertake that she shall ... - we shall be ready with the ... copies as you requested. The contract we spoke of was given up to Captain Morris of Charmouth in his purchase of Mann’s Tenement - held under the lease(mortgage) .. from Samuel Burrows - but we have requested Mr. Alford of Hea.. to endeavour to procure a copy from him for your use. When you send us the ... please say what day will suit you to meet at Taunton to complete the purchase. We believe any day will suit us after 25th .. not be able to attend personally, we purchase the money .. and the .. exchanged by .. as mother living at Taunton. Unless you have any legal point to confer on .. for Mary and self 
Yours faithfully
Samuel Alford. 17March 1837
Friday 7April at Taunton
Gave his nephew Thomas John Marker -£10,000
Mary Wyatt - setvant aged 50in 1841 got £600 servant for half a century
Margaret Frances Smith executor.
  • Rev. Richard John Marker (died 1855), Rector of Uffculme, Devon, of Yondercott House, Uffculme. He occupied the honourable position of Recorder of Bradninch 1818-1855, and his armorials are shown in a stained glass window in Bradninch Church. In 1847 he expended £3,400 of his own funds to rebuild the tower and spire of St Mary's Church, Uffculme, and also donated the great bell and clock. His heir was his son-in-law Rev. George Townsend Smith (1795–1874), son of Rev. George Smith of Ottery St Mary and Curate of Upper Ottery (1818–33) and Vicar of Uffculme (1833–1874) and husband of Margaret Frances Marker, whom he had married at Aylesbeare in 1834. In 1855 he assumed the surname Marker in lieu of Smith, in accordance with the terms of his inheritance.[33] The arms of Marker survive in a stained glass window in Uffculme Church.
Smith, George, s. Abraham, of Clyst Honiton, Devon, gent. Balliol Coll., matric 19 Oct., 1780, aged i8 ; B.A. 1784, vicar of Ottery St. Mary, Devon, 1794, and rector of Charlton 1808, until his death I Nov., 1841.
1841 Census has Richard Marker living in Charmouth.
Rev. Richard John Marker (died 1855), Rector of Uffculme, Devon, of Yondercott House, Uffculme. He occupied the honourable position of Recorder of Bradninch 1818-1855, and his armorials are shown in a stained glass window in Bradninch Church.[31] In 1847 he expended £3,400 of his own funds to rebuild the tower and spire of St Mary's Church, Uffculme, and also donated the great bell and clock
Reverend Samuel Carr (1791–1854), MA, Vicar of St Peter's, Colchester. Samuel Carr (died 1854, aged 63, at Colchester) was Fellow of Queen's College, Cambridge, 1817, curate of Loys Weedon, Northamptonshire, 1815, vicar of Great Eversden, Cambridgeshire, 1825, rector of Little Eversden, 1825-1854, and vicar of Colchester, St Peter, 1830-1854. He edited the early writings of John Hooper, Bishop of Gloucester and Worcester. For further biographical details, see Alumni Cantabrigienses.

IN MEMORY OF 
SAMUEL CARR, M.A., 
LATE VICAR OF THIS PARISH 
AND SOMETIME FELLOW 
OF QUEEN'S COLLEGE, CAMBRIDGE 
WHO DEPARTED THIS LIFE 
JUNE 17TH 1854 AGED 63. 
CALLED IN THE PROVIDENCE OF GOD 
TO MINISTER IN HIS NATIVE TOWN 
HE HELD THE CHARGE OF THIS PARISH 
FOR TWENTY FIVE YEARS 
DURING WHICH TIME 
HE FAITHFULLY PREACHED THE GOSPEL 
SETTING FORTH CHRIST 
AS THE ONLY REFUGE FOR SINNERS 
DECLARING THE WHOLE COUNSEL OF GOD 
AND SHEWING TO ALL MEN 
THE GENTLENESS UNCORRUPTNESS 
GRAVITY AND SINCERITY 
OF THE CHRISTIAN PASTOR


IN GRATEFUL AND AFFECTIONATE REMEMBRANCE 
OF HIS WORTH 
THIS MONUMENTAL STONE IS ERECTED 
BY HIS PARISHIONERS.

1851 Census shows Rev. Samuel Carr, aged 50 staying at Fernhill with his family at that time. His wife was Martha Henning
CARR, Carline L Fern Hill Daughter Unmarried F 18 1833 Clergyman's Daur Colchester 153
CARR, Martha D Fern Hill Wife Married F 59 1792 Clergyman's Wife Alton 153
CARR, Martha D Fern Hill Daughter Unmarried F 16 1835 Clergyman's Daur Colchester 153
CARR, Mary A Fern Hill Daughter Unmarried F 13 1838 Clergyman's Daur Scholar At Home Colchester 153
CARR, Prisella B Fern Hill Daughter Unmarried F 19 1832 Clergyman's Daur Colchester 153
CARR, Samuel Fern Hill Head Married M 50 1801 M A Rector Of Eyersden & Daur Of St Peters Colchester Colchester 153
CARR, Sarah M Fern Hill Daughter Unmarried F 20 1831 Clergyman's Daur Colchester 153

Dorset County Chronicle 16 December 1852

23rd September 1854
 

Annie Besant (1847 - 1933) from:Women and Welfare: Ten Victorian Women in Public Social Service By Julia Parker. It would appear that Ellen Marryatt was teaching Ann Beasant from the year 1855, which would mean that in that year, the Harrisons had moved to 3 Hillsisde, Charmouth and Ellen was living at Fernhill. Ellen Marryat, daughter of Joseph and Charlotte Marryat, 'adopted' Annie Wood (later Besant)

29 September 1855 - Salisbury and Winchester Journal Mr. Marsh has received instructions to sell by Auction at The Mary, London, on Thursday, October 11th, at twelve (unless previously disposed of by private contract), - the detached and modern residence distinguished Fern-Hill House, most delightfully situate in the mic-admired village of Charmouth, sheltered by noble hills, in the midst of most beautiful Woodland scenery, commanding an uninterrupted view of the adjacent Country and the sea. The house, which is most substantial built on the Villa style, contains seven principal and secondary bedrooms, dining, drawing room, and library, and all requisite domestic offices, coach house, sailing, and other outbuildings, a capital kitchen garden well supplied with water, sloping lawn, with green house, and small paddock, extending in all to Bout three acres.The Property is held for an unexpired term of 50 years, from the 29th September, 1846,at the nominal ground tent of £12 per annum.May be viewed on application to Mr. Carter, at the Post-Office, Charmouth, and particulars, with conditions of sale, obtained of Messrs,White, Broughton, and White, solicitors, Great Marlborough Street, Regent Street, also of Mrs Carter and at the Coach and Horses, Charmough. 29th September 1855. - Salisbury and Winchester Journal.


October 23 1866 at St. Andrews Church, Charmouth, by the Rev. William Nicholetts, of Chipstable, Somerset assisted by the rev. E.R. Breton, Recor. George Robert, third son of Henry Norris,Esq., to Caroline Celia,daughter of the late Captain Marryatt, both of Charmouth. She was the Niece of Miss Ellen Marryat of Fernhill.
Henry Edmonds Norris (1820- 1888) 
Lived at the Elms, the Village Doctor. The original of " De Le Fevre" in " A Little Stepson" by Florence Marryatt, Friend of J. Harrison, Churchwarden and  
Captain of the Volunteers. In 1846 The Elms was leased by Dr. Edmunds Norris, who became owner on his marriage with Miss P.Boshear in 1858. Dr.Norris was then a widower having married Mary Ann Rivett, whose two sons were Charles Hugh and Rivett Sheppard. The latter died at the age of two. His son by his second marriage was Francis Boshear - Scrappie - in Florence Marryat' s "A little Stepson' . She was his favourite wife and was buried opposite the East Window of the church against the wall of the Coach and Horses . His third wife was Emilia Marryat, daughter of Captain Marryat, who died in 1875. Dr.Norris was then widower for the third time and the following piece of gossip was prevalent in the village. "Would he marry one of the six spinsters living in the three houses opposite" Their hopes were never realised as a certain Mrs Metcalfe came home from India and settled in Sidrnouth and later became the fourth Mrs. Morris.
 
Emilia Marryatt (1835-1875) marrried Henry Edmond Norris at St. Thomas Church, Winchester in 1862.Emilia Marryat was born in 1835 in Plymouth, Devon. They had four children during their marriage. She died on 20 April 1875 at the age of 40.

 

Marriage of George Robert Norris of Wivliescombe to Cecilia Marryat of Charmouth in 1866
Dr. Norris was the instigator of a hospital in Charmouth, just below the New Inn at the top of The Street. The Committee included Mrs Marryat (1800-1883), who was Captain Fredrick`s widow and mother of Emilia Marryat, wife of Dr. Norris. "One of those excellent institutions on a small scale is about to be established at this place, to be supported by voluntary subscription. A House has been taken, capable of receiving a few patients, in which a nurse will reside. It will be under the Superintendence of Mr. Norris, surgeon (originator of scheme) and a committee."  21st February 1867
In 1871 Henry Norris is shown living at The Elms with his wife Emilia Marryat, who is described as an authoress.
The 1874 Directory has Miss Amelia Marryat living at Beauregard and Campbell Munro at Fernhill House and Henry Edmonds Norris at The Elms.
"Beauregard" is the house on the left of Claremont with the Bow Window, where Miss Amelia Marryat was living in 1874.

Dorset County Chronicle 03 March 1859

1861 Census has Ellen Marryatt, aged 46 as head of the house at Fernhill

The Marryats moved to the 100-acre estate of Wimbledon House, Parkside, in 1812. Ellens mother lived there until her death in 1854. Ellen Marryat, youngest of fifteen children of Joseph and Charlotte Marryat, the wealthy owners of Wimbledon House, Parkside.Lame and very serious, she stayed at home as companion to her widowed mother and nursed her famous brother, Frederick, in his last illness.On her mother’s death in 1854, she moved to Charmourh in Dorset and opened a small school.One of her pupils was Annie Besant, Freethinker and Theosophist, who later remembered Ellen’s genius for teaching and great beneficence to the neighbours. She did not not died until 1901 aged 91 and was buried in the family tomb next to St. Mary’s Church, Wimbledon.

The 1841 Census shows Ellen, aged 25 living with her widowed mother, Charlotte aged 65 at Wimbledon House in London.
The 1851 Census shows Ellen, aged 36 living with her sister Georgina Marryat at Chawton Glen in Sussex, now a large luxury Hotel.

 

When Ellen Marryat was born on 18 March 1815 in Westminster, Middlesex, her father, Joseph, was 57, and her mother, Charlotte, was 42. She had eight brothers and six sisters. She died on 26 February 1905 having lived a long life of 89 years.

Joseph Benjamin Marryat was born on 8 October 1757 in Ashover, Derbyshire, the son of Sarah and Thomas. He married Charlotte Von Geyer on 17 December 1789 in Newton, Massachusetts, USA. They had 15 children in 27 years. He died in 1824 in Wimbledon, Surrey, at the age of 67.

When Frederick Marryat was born on 10 July 1792, his father, Joseph, was 34 and his mother, Charlotte, was 19. He married Catherine Shairp on 21 January 1819. They had eight children in 17 years. He died on 9 August 1848 in Walsingham, Norfolk, at the age of 56.

Captain Frederick Marryat (1792-1848), naval hero, inventor, writer of classic English novels, and associated with two of Wimbledon’s best known houses - yet never really a resident - died exactly 164 years ago yesterday.

Marryat’s name lives on today in Marryat Road, off Parkside. Across the Common, a blue plaque in Woodhayes Road recalls his supposed residence at Gothic Lodge. 

Yet the captain was 20 years old and far away at sea in the Napoleonic Wars when his parents first moved to the 100-acre estate of Wimbledon House, Parkside, in 1812.

He would never have been more than an occasional visitor. Moreover, although he leased Gothic Lodge for his wife and children between 1820 and 1827, he spent little time there himself as his career took him far away for virtually the entire period.

Despite this, Captain Marryat has always been so associated with Wimbledon that the biggest known collection of his written works – 700 strong - was once donated to the local museum. There it remained for 27 years from 1922 until 1949 before being transferred to the British Museum (now the British Library).

Frederick Marryat was actually born in Great George Street, Westminster, on 10 July 1792, a second son and one of 15 children.

His father, Joseph Marryat, chairman of Lloyds and MP for Sandwich, was descended from French Huguenots. His mother Charlotte was an American from Boston. Frederick was sent to school at Ponders End, Enfield, and having tried to run away to sea as a boy, joined the Royal Navy in 1806 as a midshipman.

Serving in the Caribbean in 1811, he risked his life for his ship when it was severely damaged in a storm.

On five occasions he would distinguish himself by jumping into the sea to rescue seamen lost overboard.

After action against the Americans he was promoted to Lieutenant in 1812, the same year his family moved to Wimbledon, and he reached the rank of Commander in 1815.

He then worked to expand and improve the Navy’s system of maritime flag signals. Creating the International Code of Signals used for generations afterwards, he earned himself membership of the Royal Society in 1817.n 1818 he invented a lifeboat and was awarded the Gold Medal of the Royal Humane Society.

In 1819 he married Catharine, daughter of Britain’s Consul-General in Russia. They had 11 children and it was for them that he leased Gothic Lodge in 1820, near his parents’ home. In 1821 he commanded the ship that announced the death of the exiled Napoleon on St Helena.

His naval career continued for another nine years before he resigned to become a full time writer. His best known novels, published from 1836 onwards, were the classics Mr Midshipman Easy, Masterman Ready and The Children of the New Forest. After travelling extensively, he eventually settled with his family at Langham in Norfolk on an estate ten times the size of his parents’ property in Wimbledon.

His father died suddenly in 1824 but his mother remained at Parkside until her own death in 1854.

Unlike her famous son, Charlotte Marryat became very much a true Wimbledonian, carrying out good works for the community.

She was also a noted horticulturalist. The estate’s greenhouses were used to cultivate many species of plant never before grown in England.

One of her daughters married Henry Lindsay, Vicar of St Mary's, and the churchyard still contains a Marryat family tomb with eight family members buried there.

Anne Besant.Born in 1847 to Emily Morris and William Wood, Annie Besant spent her upbringing in the care of her mother's friend, Ellen Marryat. She married the Reverend Frank Besant in 1866, though the pair later separated.She was a writer and political thinker renowned for her unorthodox religious views. Besant was committed to first atheism, freethought, socialism, secularism and later theosophy - a stance that was to radically differ from the traditional moral opinion of her husband the Rev. Frank Besant. (It was on such grounds that the pair later became separated).

Annie Besant (1847-1933), an estranged Anglican priest's wife, who had rejected Christianity and become a free thinker, and eventually a theosophist, was one of the most remarkable British women of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. A gifted public speaker and prolific writer, she campaigned for free thought, birth control, improved education, and women’s rights. 

Besant seemed destined to fall into a normal, humdrum middle class life. However things were about to radically change. Just prior to marrying her husband, Annie become deeply involved with the blight of the working poor in Manchester. This led to her joining numerous socialist and workers societies, as well as joining the National Secular Society and renouncing her Christian faith. After she refused to take communion, they separated, with Annie taking custody of their daughter and her husband gaining custody of their son.
Besant would go on to become a widely-travelled social reformer who campaigned for Women’s Rights as well as a socialist, theosophist and writer. Besant was imprisoned along with good friend Charles Bradlaugh for publishing a book by birth control campaigner and supporter Charles Knowlton. Despite this, Besant persevered in her free-thinking methodology, becoming an important speaker for the National Secular Society, and was elected for the London School Board.

 In 1846 The Elms was leased by Dr. Edmunds Norris, who became owner on his marriage with Miss P.Boshear in 1858. Dr.Norris was then a widower having married Mary Ann Rivett, whose two sons were Charles Hugh and Rivett Sheppard. The latter died at the age of two. His son by his second marriage was Francis Boshear - Scrappie - in Florence Marryat' s "A little Stepson' . She was his favourite wife and was buried opposite the East Window of the church against the wall of the Coach and Horses . His third wife was Emilia Marryat (1830-1874), daughter of Captain Marryat, who died in 1874 in Charmouth.n 1819, Marryat married Catherine Shairp, with whom he had four sons (of whom only the youngest Frank outlived him) and seven daughters, including Florence, a prolific novelist and his biographer; Emilia, a writer of moralist adventure novels in her father's vein.

Emilia Marryat (later Emilia Marryat Norris; 1835?–1875[1]) was a British author. The daughter of author Capt. Frederick Marryat and his wife Catherine, she was known as a children's author who wrote adventure novels infused with moral lessons in the style of her father. Some of her novels, including Amongst the Maoris (1874), are set in the Pacific and New Zealand.[2] Amongst the Maoris is the first novel to take the Waikato region of New Zealand's North Island as a setting.[3] Though two of her novels have Australian content, she is not known to have ever visited the country.[1]

Her sisters Florence and Augusta were also authors: Augusta wrote adventure fiction (Left to Themselves: A Boy's Adventure in Australia (1878)),[2] and Florence was a prolific author of sensationalist novels who also acquired a reputation for hanging out with spiritual mediums.

Captain Frederick Marryat (10 July 1792 – 9 August 1848[1]) was a British Royal Navy officer, a novelist, and an acquaintance of Charles Dickens. He is noted today as an early pioneer of the sea story, particularly for his semi-autobiographical novel Mr Midshipman Easy (1836), for his children's novel The Children of the New Forest (1847), and for a widely used system of maritime flag signalling, known as Marryat's Code.

Frederick Marryat(born July 10, 1792, London—died Aug. 9, 1848, Langham, Norfolk, Eng.), naval officer and the first important English novelist after Tobias Smollett to make full and amusing use of his varied experience at sea.

Marryat entered the Royal Navy at the age of 14 and served with distinction in many parts of the world before retiring in 1830 with a captain’s rank. He then began a series of adventure novels marked by a lucid, direct narrative style and an unfailing fund of incident and humour. These included The King’s Own (1830), Peter Simple (1834), and Mr. Midshipman Easy (1836). He also wrote a number of children’s books, among which The Children of the New Forest (1847), a story of the English Civil Wars, is a classic of children’s literature. A Life and Letters was prepared by his daughter Florence (1872).

The Children of the New Forest was written during Marryat's years of retirement in Norfolk, and it was his last novel published during his lifetime. Marryat would sometimes travel to Hampshire to stay at his brother George's country house, Chewton Glen (now a five star hotel), on the edge of the New Forest.[1] It was here that he gathered material for his novel, which is set in and around the real-life manor of Arnewood (spelled without the "e" in Marryat's novel) just south of the village of Sway.[2][3] Three miles east of Arnewood is the coastal town of Lymington which also features in Marryat's novel.[2]

 

The BBC has adapted the novel four times for television. These series were first shown in 1955 (5 episodes),[14] 1964 (6 episodes),[15] 1977 (5 episodes),[16] and 1998 (6 episodes).[17]
25 April 1872 - London Daily News - London
27th June 1868 Bridport News
20th June 1871 - Western Times
1871 Census shows Campbell Munro, aged 47 living at Fernhill.
13 June 1879 - Bridport News
1881 Census has John Eliot, aged 60 living at Fernhill.
The wedding of George Edward Eliot to Agnes Charlotte Marryatt at Mapperton, near Beaminster, Dorset on 8th July 1868. Witnessed by William Eliot and Colonel George Marryat. When Charlotte Marryatt was born in 1804, her father, Joseph, was 47, and her mother, Charlotte, was 31. She had eight brothers and six sisters including Ellen.
The following Officers having completed their qualifying service in the rank of LieutenantColonel, to be Colonels in the Army from the dates specified, viz.:— Colonel John Eliot, Royal Artillery. Dated 18th February, 1866.
14 October 1885 - Taunton Courier, and Western Advertiser 

10 June 1886 - Morning Post - London. reports the death of Major General John Eliot at Fernhill, Charmouth. Retired, Royal (Late Bengal) Artillery

Indenture mentions Fernhill and adjoining fields Major Eliot had purchased.
3rd February 1888 Bridport News
21st September 1888 Bridport News
1891 Census has Lionel Smith Gordon, aged 58 living at Fernhill
1891 Census has Henry Eliot, son of General Eliot of Fernhill, aged 37 living at Gresham House, Higher Sea Lane, Charmouth. By 1901 he had moved to 3 Hillside, Charmouth.Tennis Courts which were started about 1880 by General Eliot and George Pavey, father of Reginald, . In 1849 No. 3 Hillside was sold to Captain William Mould and was occupied by James Harrison, the well known geologist,and in 1866 by James Wilson a surgeon. The next, owner was Samuel Potter, solicitor, who bought it for £750 in 1875. After him was Henry Eliot, son of General Eliot of Fernhill, who had just returned from Canada, where he had met Buffalo Bill. When Buffalo Bill visited England with his Wild West Show, Eliot went to see him and asked if he remembered him. Buffalo Bill replied that he was unable to do so, and Eliot begged him to lend him his hat. With the wide-brimmed cow boy hat on his head he was at once recognised. Henry Eliot was a great horseman and used to break in horses harnessed to a light-cart on the beach. I can remember him driving backward and forwards on the sand between the Factory and Black Ven. He left the house to his daughter Katie, whose brother Winthrop and his family lived there for some time. In 1922 John, Grandson of Henry Eliot was tragically drowned in the River Charmouth. 
14 June 1895 - Western Times He was also known as Lionel Eldred Smith.2 He succeeded as the 2nd Baronet Smith [U.K., 1838] on 2 January 1842.1 He fought in the Crimean War.2 He gained the rank of Captain in the 71st Light Infantry.2 He fought in the Indian Mutiny.2 On 5 February 1868 his name was legally changed to Lionel Eldred Smith-Gordon by Royal Licence.
Western Gazette 29 April 1898
1905 Will for Ellen Marryat shows her leaving her estate to George Eliot, son of John Eliot who lived at Fern Hill from 1880-1888. He was at that time a retired colonel in H.M. Army.
1901 Census showing John Kennedy, aged 53, retired School master living at Fernhill
23rd February 1907. This newscutting shows Rev.John Kennedy, aged 59, living at Fernhill marrying Ethel Mary Reid, aged 26, of Fountains Mead in Charmouth. They were to have 3 children - Katharine, Mary and John.
1911 Census for Fernhill has John Kennedy, aged 63 living at Fernhill. They had a son John Reid Kennedy, born in 1910 who lived until 2001 and daughter Mary Ethel Kenedy, born in 1909. Both were born in Charmouth. There was a 34 year age difference between John and his wife.
13 November 1912 - Exeter and Plymouth Gazette
09 July 1920 - Exeter and Plymouth Gazette 
A record of the death of John Kennedy in 1931, aged 84
7th April 1933 Western Gazette
31 December 1937 - Exeter and Plymouth Gazette 
08 July 1938 - Western Gazette 
12 July 1946 - Exeter and Plymouth Gazette
Ethel Kennedy died in 1973, aged 92 and was still living at Grasmere, The Street, Charmouth where she moved in 1950 from Fernhill.
The Memorial to Diana and John Reid Kennedy
The Pass familyL-R - Diana, Philippa, Mrs. Olive Pass. Joan, Colonel Douglas Pass, Honor Matilda, Katherine. It was Diana Pass who was to marry John Reid, son of John and Ethel Kennedy of Fernhill in 1954. His mother continued to live at Grasmere, Charmouth until her death. Berha Gayner, who was Katherine Kennedy`s Aunt lived next door at Dolphin house from 1946 and may explain Ethel Kennedy`s move from Fernhill.
1980 Electoral Roll shows Katherine Kennedy continuing to live at Grasmere after Ethel, her mother died in 1973 . Katharine lived on until 2003 and died aged 87.
Grasmere today
09 February 1962 - Birmingham Daily Post 
12 February 1964 The Tatler
An Aerial view taken in 1957 of Fernhill, before it was altered and still had the large Greenhouse on its side.
An Advert from 1963 for Fernhill
1966 Advert for Fernhill
1964 Advert with J.S. Greenhaigh as Proprieter
1951 Electoral Roll shows Hebe and Annie Lang at Fernhill House. Ethel Kennedy had moved to Grasmere, The Street, Charmouth the same year. The Langs were only there a year then moved to Lias Lee in Lower Sea Lane. In 1892 The Elms was purchased by Captain Dixon (8th The Kings Liverpool Regiment). Captain and Mrs. Dixon and their four daughters Their daughter Georgiana Catherine married Dr.W.D.Lang in April 1908. Dr. Lang was a relative of Miss Templer of No.l Hillside, with whom he. used to stay. Dr. and Mrs. Lang came to live in "Lias Lea" Lower Sea Lane in the 1930s.William Dickson Lang was born on 28 September 1878 in India, the son of Hebe and Edward. He married Georgiana Catherine Dixon in 1909. They had two children during their marriage. He died on 7 March 1966 in Dorset at the age of 87.
1952 List has Henry and Margaret Carmichael at Fernhill House.
1953 List has Henry and Emily Wickham at Fernhill House.
1957 List has Percy and Elizabeth Colby at Fernhill House
1958 Electoral Roll shows Anne Gove at Fernhill House
1961 Electoral Roll shows Hugh and Sarah Mace running Fernhill Hotel
1964 Electoral Roll shows Dennis and Betty Dungey running Fernhill Hotel
1965 - 1971 Electoral Roll shows Duncan & Joan Mackinnon running Fernhill Hotel
1973 - 1980 Electoral Roll shows Charles and Valerie Batley running Fernhill Hotel
 
1985 Electoral Roll shows Stewart Fleming running Fernhill Hotel and the Batleys, the prevcious owners at Fernhill Bungalow.
1990 Electoral Roll shows Trevor, Susan and Sandra Lloyd, Tony and Sally Pawson and Emma LLoyd running Fernhill Hotel
1995 and 2000 Electoral Rolls shows Terence and Debra Bridges are running Fernhill Hotel
2005 Electoral Roll showsBrowen Cound, Anne, Jayne,John and Julia Hancock running Ferrnhill Hotel
I have purchased all that piece of Meadow Ground formerly enclosed by ne Edward Mabell deceased containing by estimation 3 acres thereabouts formerly an Orcahrd lying at Langmoor and adjoining to the lands formerly of John Burrodge Esq. and also that Orcjard formerly commonly reputed a Burgage of acre of Grond and in the tenure of one George Comns and Willaim Comins deceased afterwards of Clement Joynes all which sad Premises are now in my occupation and are situate lying and being in Charmouth afotesaid late of the estate of Mrs Frances Oke of Pinney deceased which I now give to my wife Frances Shute proved 1814
The same was the case with one who signs in 1873 as " Cam Munro." This is Campbell Munro, who was then living at Fernhill. He was the second son of Sir Thomas Munro, an Anglo-Indian soldier of great distinction, who became Governor of Madras in 1820, was made a baronet in 1825, and died while still Governor, in 1827. Campbell Munro also began life as a soldier. After retiring from the Army, he came to live at Fernhill, and Fairfield (with which the family name is still connected at Lyme) was not his home till 1879, and then only from time to time. It was in 1879, too, that his name first appears in the Lyme Burgess Roll. Later on the snows of his native Scotland drove him to Lyme Regis and Fairfield more frequently. He succeeded his brother in the baronetcy in 1901 and died in 1913. Various Hingestons appear in various capacities. John, an attorney in Broad Street, acted as treasurer till as late as 1836.
Richard John Marker Esq. for many years a constant visitor to Charmouth, by deed bearing date 22nd August 1837; conveyed to certain trustees a close of land, the rent to be applied annually in supplying blankets and clothing to such aged and infirm poor as are not in the receipt of parochial relief. It was called THe Poors or Marker Charity by Charity Commissioners in 1879-80. 5hus the property was not sold but passed from one tenant to another. At one time Mr. James Harrison occupied the house.He added to it, at his own expense, the billiard room and two bedroom above it. This Me. Harrison was interested in Geology and excavated an Dinosaur, now in the Natural History Museom, which bears his name. A late tenant was Sir Campbell Munro, who being the father of a family of nine , built at his own expense the nursery wing. General Eliot and Sir Lionel Smith-Gordon lived there after Sir Campbell. 
At a subsequent date the property fell into a state of great disrepair and the ecclesiastical commissioners sold it for a small sum to a purchaser who resold it a few years later at a profit of £300 to Mr. Kennedy. As sanitation was primitive as the kitchen chimney ran horizontally the full length of the house and was cleaned by a cannon ball, it is not surprising that it cost £500 to bring the house up to even the most essential modern requirements. Possibly it am6 be of interest to mention that what are called the Pond fields were owned by a maiden lady in Australia, for whom old Coles the baker, acted a middleman. Cutting out the middleman was one of our greatest successes and with the purchase in recent years from Mr. Pass of Resting Hill Meadows, behind the house, Fernhill property is now complete.E.M. Kennedy


 

JAMES HARRISON OF CHARMOUTH, GEOLOGIST (1819-1864) by W. D. LANG, SC.D., F.R.S.
JAMES Harrison was born at Purley on the 6th February, 1819. He was a student at St. George's Hospital, but was not strong enough to pursue a medical career, and gave it up, coming with his sisters to live at Charmouth about 1850. There he met Miss E. M. Ludlam whom he married in 1851, and lived at Fernhill which he rented from Miss Marryat, sister of Captain Marryat, the novelist. From Fernhill he moved to No. 3 Hillside. At Charmouth he collected the fossils of the district, and from time to time corresponded about them with the pioneer palaeontologists. The letters written to him by these scientists were carefully kept, and late in 1937 were presented to Lyme Regis Museum by his younger daughter, Miss Mary Harrison, together with some of the fossil specimens of his collection, some published works on geology by H. T. De la Beche and others, and a sum of £20. He is best known as the discoverer of the earliest British dinosaur ; but he also found some of the choicest specimens of invertebrate fossils which the Dorset Lias has yielded.
During his lite at Charmouth, James Harrison suffered ill-health, and died there on the 9th September, 1864. From the evidence afforded by the accompanying letters, it seems that he was taken seriously ill during 1858, and his geological activities were then limited to what he could do from his bed. The industry which he showed during his illness is commented on by Owen when describing a specimen of Plesiosaurus dolichodeirus (now in the British Museum) which Harrison obtained and developed, and then sent on to Owen for investigation. " The inter-locking of the teeth of the upper and lower jaws," writes Owen, " through the singular care and skill devoted by Mr. Harrison to the removal of the matrix, is peculiarly well displayed in this instructive fossil." And again, " It is an admirable example of patience, pains and skill; in the bestowal of which, for the furtherance of science, upon the fossils roughly wrought out of the quarries in his neighbourhood, Mr. Harrison found solace during the long and trying illness which confined him to his bed, until his final release by death."
His daughter writes of him :•— " He was tall and good looking, but when I remember him he was nearly always in bed. Next to fossils, his great interest was in the garden. We had a nice walled one at the back of the house in which he grew almost every kind of fruit, and it flourished there." He is buried in the churchyard at Monkton Wyld. The grave lies to the south-west of the church, and is marked by a flat stone slab surrounded by a curb and inscribed on one side, " In Memory of James Harrison," and on the other, " Born at Purley, Feb 6, 1819. Died at Charmouth Sept 9,1864 " A yew-tree stands at the head of the grave. He left two daughters, born in 1852 and 1854, respectively.
To understand the bearing of James Harrison's collecting upon science, it is necessary to consider the general geological outlook in his time. At the end of the eighteenth century, geology in Britain was established on a firm basis by the general acceptance of Hutton's views, and the great pioneers of the new learning were coming into being. In particular, Lyme and Charmouth were fortunate in fostering two children whose lives were spent in furthering the young science ; namely, Henry De la Beche (1796—1855), who became the greatest geologist of his day in Britain, and in 1836 founded the Geological Survey ; and Mary Anning (1799—1847), wno in the early years of the nineteenth century transformed the business of collecting fossils from an occupation, to an art,-—from mere ' curiosity ' vending, to carefully supplying scientists with selected material. Largely owing to her activities, the Liassic fossils of the Dorset coast became known to the palaeontologists of her time, and, apart from De la Beche, whose boyhood was spent at Charmouth and Lyme, Conybeare (for a few years vicar of Axminster), Buckland, Owen, Egerton, and Enniskillen frequently visited Lyme, and their publications abound in descriptions and figures of the fossils of the neighbourhood.
Mary Anning sold her fossils to those who would buy ; and therefore many specimens collected by her came into the scientists' hands indirectly, and all record of her connexion with them is lost. Meanwhile other dealers arose, of which the best known are J. W. Marder of Lyme, and Robert Damon of Weymouth ; while amateurs, resident or visiting, made their own collections and often lent, or disposed of, their specimens to the scientists. Such were Colonel Birch in the earlier years, and Edward Day and James Harrison in the middle of the century.
It will be seen that most of the following letters were written by Richard Owen when he was Superintendent of the Natural History Collections at the British Museum. Owen's speciality was fossil reptiles, and he was engaged in monographing the British Jurassic reptiles when Harrison made his great discovery of the armoured dinosaur Scelidosaurus. This is how Owen reports the matter at the meeting of the British Association at Manchester in 1861 (see letter 20-30. ix. 1861). After remarking that hitherto no Dinosaur was known to have lived before Megalosaurus of Great Oolite age, he writes, " Mr. Harrison, a retired medical gentleman residing at Charmouth on the Dorset coast, near the magnificent liassic cliffs that had afforded such rich evidences of marine reptilia, had devoted his leisure to the collection of fossil remains from those cliffs. About three years ago, Mr. Harrison obtained, from a part of the cliff which was an upper member, if not the uppermost, of the Lower Lias/1' some fragments of limb bones of so novel a character that he sent them to him (Professor Owen) for his opinion. He was surprised to receive such specimens from that locality and formation, seeing that the fragments presented unequivocal evidence of the Dinosaurian order, and of a species which, judging from the femur, was closely allied to Iguanodon. Mr. Harrison was quickened in his researches by receiving a reply to this effect; he offered rewards to the quarrymen, and at length he became possessed of the most complete skeleton of a Dinosaurian reptile ever obtained from any formation or locality."
Owen turned over the fish remains, which Harrison sent to him, to Sir Philip Egerton, who, in turn corresponded with Harrison. Lord Enniskillen, Sir Philip Egerton's great friend and collaborator in all that concerned fossil fishes, appears in the correspondence as conveying dinosaur remains from Harrison at Charmouth, to Owen in London; and incidentally identifies a lobster-like fossil belonging to Harrison as Coleia. The other correspondence deals with invertebrates of no great importance, except the original example of the lobster-like Scapheus, now called Pseudoglyphaea, This light-footed creature is portrayed in the scene of Liassic life which hangs in the Museum, where it may be seen tip-toeing over the rocks on the right.
(According to T. Wright, Scelidosaurus came from the Mudstone, i.e., Bed 85, in the zone of Promtcroceras planicosta, now placed well down in the Lower Lias.)


JAMES HARRISON OF CHARMOUTH
105
Harrison's most important find, the Scelidosaurus skeleton, was the only specimen he flowed the British Museum to acquire ; but after his death, a number of specimens were : urchased from his widow. They are entered in the British Museum Purchase Book as -.iving been bought on the i8th October, 1865, and are listed, with the prices, as follows :—• ' Head of Ichthyosaurus. Lias. Lyme. £2 IDS. od."
"B. M. register No. 39492. Exhibited on wall of Reptile Gallery]. ' Head of Plesiosaurus dolichodeirus. Lias. Reptilia Pal. Soc. xvii, vol. iii. £20 os. od."
[B. M. register No. 39490. Exhibited in table-case in Reptile Gallery. Figured by
Owen, 1863 " Fossil Reptilia of the Liassic Formations," part iii, Mon. Pal. Soc.,
pp. 8—ii, pi. iii, fig. i]. ' Lower jaw of Plesiosaurus dolichodeirus. £4 os. od."
[B. M. register No. 39491. Exhibited in table-case in Reptile Gallery. Figured by
Owen, 1863, torn, cit, p. 10], ' Ptycholepis curtus. Lias. Lyme Regis. £5 os. od."
[A fish. B. M. register No. 39493. Figured by A. S. Woodward, 1895, B. M. Catalogue of Fossil Fishes, part iii, p. 321, pi. x, fig. i]. ' Two portions of Chondrosteus acipenseroides, £4 os. od."
[A Sturgeon-like fish. B. M. register Nos. 39494, listed in A. S. Woodward, 1895, torn.
cit., p. 33 ; and 39495, listed in A. S. Woodward, 1895, torn, cit., p. 33, and figd.
A. S. Woodward, 1889, Proc. Geol. Assoc., vol. xi, p. 40, pi. i., fig. 7], ' Spn. of Hoploparia longimana. Lyme. Greensand. £2 10s. od."
[A lobster from the Cowstones, exhibited in table-case in geological galleries in British
Museum. B. M. register No. 46323. Figured as Homarus longimanus (Sowerby) H.
Woods, 1931, " Fossil Macrurous Crustacea," part vii, Mon. Pal. Soc., p. 90, pi. xxvi,
figs. 2a, 2b]. ' Scapheus ancylochelis. Lias. Lyme. Quart. Journ. Geol. Soc., xix, p. 12. £5 os. od."
[Another lobster-like form, exhibited in table-case in geological galleries in British
Museum. B. M. register No. 46322. Descr. and figured H. Woodward, 1863, Quart.
Journ. Geol. Soc., vol. xix, p. 318, pi. xi; and as Pseudoglyphea ancylochelis H. Woods,
1926, " Fossil Macrurous Crustacea," part iii, Mon. Pal. Soc., pp. 46—7, pi. xii, fig. 2]. 1 i Ophioderma. Marlstone do. 5s. od."
[A Brittle Star-fish from the well-known " Starfish bed " of the Middle Lias, exposed
on the cliffs East of Seatown. B. M. register No. 45363], ' 2sp. Pedina Bechei. Lias. Lyme. £i 10s. od."
[Small sea-urchins, now called Diademopsis bechei (Broderip). B. M. register No. 45364], ' i Coral (Isastraed). 3s. od."
[This specimen cannot be traced]. ' 28 Belemnites various species. £6 Os. od."
[24 specimens have been found under the B. M. register Nos. 39895—6, 39899—903.
39896 is a specimen of Belemnites clavatus figured by J. Prestwich, 1888, " Geology,"
vol. ii, p. 184, fig. 873. 39900, 39901, 39903 are specimens showing the hooks which
beset the arms of the belemnite animal, and 39901 is a magnificent specimen figured by
G. C. Crick, 1907, Proc. Malac. Soc., vol. vii, pp. 275-6, pi. xxiii, fig. 4) showing, besides
the hooks in position, other parts of the animal, including the ink-sac]. " 15 Hooks of Cephalopoda. £2 5s. od."
[ProbablyB. M. register No, 39897 which are " Rhyncholites " or beaks of Nautilus
(see letter i, 18. x. 1855)].Correspondence of James Harrison, geologist, 1855-1864, with preface by Dr. W.D. Lang, F.R.S..


 

 
 
 
 
 

Mrs Ludlam living in Charmouth in 1855, listed in 1844 directory,Ludlam Mrs, & Miss 1851 directory

Mail Theft 1845

EDWARD SPICER was indicted for that he, being employed in the Post-office, did on the 18th of January steal a post letter, containing 2 sovereigns, 1 half-sovereign, 1 half-crown, 3 shillings, 1 sixpence; and 1 10l. note, and 1 5l. note; the property of Her Majesty's Postmaster-General.—Other COUNTS, varying the manner of stating the charge.

MR. SOLICITOR-GENERAL, with MESSRS. ADOLPHUS and BODKIN conducted the Prosecution.

CHARLES HARDEN . I am a solicitor, and live in Sergeant's-inn, Chancery-lane. On Saturday, the 18th of Jan. last, I had occasion to remit to Mrs. Ludlam, of Charmouth, a 10l. note, a 5l. note, some sovereigns and silver—I got the notes from Messrs. Gosling's, the bankers, by virtue of a check of my own—I enclosed them in a letter, which I directed to Mrs. Ludlam, and took it to the General Post-office, St. Martin's-le-grand, to be registered—I took it to a box, and gave it to a clerk who sits at the window, to have it registered—I paid 1s. for the registering, and 6d. for postage—that was about half-past four o'clock in the afternoon-at that time the notes and money were safe in the letter—on the Thursday following, in consequence of something I heard from Mrs. Ludlam, I went to the Post-office again
.ELIZABETH LUDLAM . I live at Charmouth. In Jan. last I expected a letter with a remittance, from Mr. Haiden, my attorney—I have never received one.

In the year 1858 James Harrison of Charmouth was quarrying the cliffs presumably for the manufacture of cement. He found a few fragmentary fossils of limb-bones and sent them for examination to the famous Professor Richard Owen of the Natural History Museum (originally the British Museum (Natural History), London. Owen commented in 1861 that these came from the "upper member of the Lower Lias" at Charmouth. It is not clear in exactly which bed these were discovered.Later, Owen (1861-1881) explained that 
" the continued attention paid by James Harrison, Esq., to the organic remains discovered during quarrying operations on the face of the cliff of Lower Lias at Charmouth, Dorsetshire, with liberal encouragement to the workmen, has procured for the original discoverer of the first indication of the Scelidosaur the materials for the present account of an almost complete skeleton of that extinct reptile. Following in the track opened out by the discovery of the skull described in the preceding Monograph, about twelve successive blocks of Lias were secured, with more or less evident indications of included bones, all of which, together with the skull, have been purchased for the British Museum. Subsequent complete exposure of the included organic remains has brought to light the entire vertebral column of the trunk and tail, to very near the termination of the latter..."

 
 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b6IsZ-1WGeA

http://www.itv.com/presscentre/ep1week36/dinosaur-britain

 

 

No. 3 Hillside where James Harrison moved to in 1855 and where he died in 1864.
 
Not many people would think that the small Dorset village of Charmouth is home to one of Britain’s most complete and best preserved dinosaurs. Scelidosaurus was a plant-eating armoured dinosaur that was alive in the Lower Jurassic, around 195 million years ago. It has only been found here at Charmouth and nowhere else in the world. It is so well preserved that patches of the dinosaur’s skin are visible along with the remains of its last meal. The first specimen was discovered in 1858 when local men were quarrying the cliffs to produce cement. A local doctor, James Harrison heard about the bones and sent themoff to Richard Owen, a man famous for inventing the term ‘dinosaur’. Since then around 8 partial dinosaurs have been discovered, a mix of both adults and juveniles. The most complete specimen was found by a local fossil collector David Sole in 2000.

Annie Besant was a British social reformer, campaigner for women's rights and a supporter of Indian nationalism.
Annie Woods was born in London on 1 October 1847. She had an unhappy childhood, undoubtedly partly due to her father's death when she was five. Annie's mother persuaded her friend Ellen Marryat, sister of the writer Frederick Marryat, to take responsibility for her daughter and Ellen ensured that Annie received a good education.

153; Fern Hill; Ellen MARRYAT ; Head; U; 46; Fundholder; Middlesex; ; F15P23

153; Fern Hill; Frederick T. MARRYAT ; Nephew; ; 5; Scholar; Mapperton; ; F15P23

153; Fern Hill; Emma Isabella MANN ?; Visitor; U; 13; Scholar; Lincoln; ; F15P23

153; Fern Hill; MaryAnn MILLS ; Serv; U; 25; Cook; Somerset; ; F15P23

153; Fern Hill; Louisa Ann WRIGHT ; Serv; U; 32; Nurse; Surrey; ; F15P23

153; Fern Hill; Elizabeth F. STOCKING ; Serv; U; 28; Housemaid; Middlesex; ; F15P23

153; Fern Hill; Ellen LUGG ; Serv; U; 16; Under housemaid; Charmouth; ; F15P23

153; Fern Hill; Henry CARNE ; Serv; U; 18; Footman; Charmouth; ; F15P23

153; Fern Hill; Charles COPP ; Serv; U; 17; Stable boy; Wooton Fitzpayne; ; F15P23

154; Fern Hill; John PEARCE ; Head; M; 38; Farmer occuping 40 acres employing 1 man; Litton Cheney; ; F15P23

154; Fern Hill; Harriott PEARCE ; Wife; M; 43; ; G. Toller; ; F15P23

154; Fern Hill; Hananah PEARCE ; Daur; U; 18; Dairy assistant; Somerset; ; F15P23

154; Fern Hill; Mary PEARCE ; Aun; U; 65; ; Frampton; ; F15P23

In 1743, The Elms was owned by Samuel Burrow, blacksmith, who sold it to Walter Oke of Axmouth. In 1805 Thomas Shute was the owner and in 1826 Captain E.Gage Morris, father of the well known naturalist Francis Orpen Morris (1810 - 1893).
In the reign of Charles II Edward Mabell a yeoman of Charmouth enclosed about 3 acres of land at Langmoor, which were later converted into an orchard. In 1753 this orchard was owned by Jacob Burrow of Charmouth , a Blacksmith, who sold it to Samuel Burrow, likewise a Blacksmith, for £60. He in 1750 sold it to Walter Oke with other property in Charmouth including that other Orchard commonly reputed Burgage of area formerly in the tenure of George Comins for £400. The orchard was adjoining to the land formerly of John Burridge.
Walter Oke died in 1763 and the property was left to his children and grandchildren, namely Thomas Shute and Mr. George Smith and others. There was a yearly quit tent of six pence payable to the Lord of the Manor and aright of way or passage through the Burgage cal8mes by the Rev. Brian Coombe.
In 1811 these two closes and meadows were released to Thomas Shute by Walter Oke Smith.
On or about 17th March 1837, the estate was purchased. Y Richard John Marker, but there is no mention in the deeds of a house being built. By a deed bearing the date 22nd August 1837, Richard Marker conveyed the property to the Charity Commission, the rent to be applied annually by supplying blankets and clothing to such aged and poor of Charmouth as those. It in receipt of parochial relief. The Trustees were the Rector and two others,
After the death of Mr. & Mrs Marker, the property had several Tenants, but the trustees allowed the house to be c9me very dilapidated and in 1879 they appealed to the commissioners to be allowed to sell it. The tenant at the time was General Eliot who had bought the lease from Sir Campbell Munro - he offered £750, which was turned down by the Commissioners. The last tenant was Sir Lionel Smith Gordon. When he left the Committee f8ally gave way and the property was sold at the close of the century.
Notes the property sold by Samuel Burrow to Salter Oke in 1760 for £400, besides the two orchards at Langmoor , 8n lied Mann’s Tenement ( now the Elms), The George Inn, a messuage known as Rose and Crown and all that other messuage where Samuel Burrow was living.
The piece of ground enclosed by Mable was called Farrs Orchard after Jacob Burrows son in law.
1851 Census showing Elizabeth Cleave and Henry Norris as neighbours
 
 
 
David Hawgood
26 Cloister Road, Acton, London W3 ODE. Phone 020 8 993 2897, email david@hawgood.com
26 October 2016 Rob and Jo Illingworth, Fernhill Hotel Charmouth Dorset DT66BX
Dear Rob and Jo,

I also did some searches for Fern Hill in British Newspaper Archive, online indexes, transcripts and facsimiles of newspapers. The Devon County Chronicle for 8th August 1850 has: "Charmouth: The Rev. G C Gorham whose late proceedings with the Bishop of Exeter have caused his name to be well known throughout the British nation is now with his family occupying Fern Hill House in this parish. Mr Bowdler, who was proctor for the Rev. Gentleman in the Court of Arches, is owner of the Fern Hill property."
The Rev. Gorham apparently used to omit parts of the service for "The churching of women" (when a woman comes to church first time after childbirth) and had a law case in the ecclesiastical court about this.
I don't think Charles Bowdler ever lived at Fern Hill - he seems to have rented it to various clergymen. In 1851 he was living in Kensington age 65. His wife died and he married again in 1852. hi 1861 and 1871 he was living in North Mundham in Sussex, and he died at Runcton House near Chichester in 1879. The September 1880 probate record shows his estate as under £600 - as a lawyer he probably managed to put most of his estate into trusts.
The 1841 census for Charmouth has no entry for Fern Hill, which confirms that it was built in the 1840s.
So that is the result of a quick trawl on the internet -1 have subscriptions to Ancestry and to Britishnewspaperarchive.
Yours sincerely,
Before Fernhill became the place we know today like everywhere is started off very different. The slope that the hotel is on is the back face of a very old and very big landslip. Fernhill was originally a 3 acre mix of arable land and cliffs called Farrs Orchard on the side of the old coach road between Bridport and Axminster. In 1832 when the Charmouth tunnel was opened Fernhill Lane was no longer used by regular traffic so became incredibly overgrown, an extract from R.W.J Paveys book says 'The hedges were over grown with ferns and wild flowers, the trees overhanging the fairway grew unchecked and the surface of the road became a green trackway' Then in 1924 with the closing of the coast road to Lyme Fernhill Lane came to life again with the road being widened and the gradient made easier.
In 1837 R.S Marker purchased Farrs Orchard to build what was then known as Fern Hill House, it is unsure when Fern Hill became Fernhill. Mr and Mrs Marker found such benefits to their health whilst living at Fernhill that the house was left upon their death to the Ecclesiastical commissioners to use for charity, the commissioners then found suitable tenants to occupy the house the rent was in the form of an annual supply of blankets and clothing to the old, infirm and poor who were not able to be helped by the parish.
------>-
ic first tenants of the house in 1851 were Reverend Samuel Carr and Mrs Martha Carr with
their 5 daughters and equal number of servants. Rev. Carr was the Rector of Little Evesdon and the vicar of St Peters in Colchester before moving to Dorset.
The next tenant in 1861 at Fernhill was Miss Marryat (sister of Captain Marryat the novelist) who ran Fernhill as a school house it was during this time that whilst under the care of Miss Marryat that Anne Besant was a pupil here, she talks about Fernhill in her autobiography;
' Miss Marryat took a beautiful place, Fern Hill, near Charmouth, in Dorsetshire, on the borders of Devon, and there she lived for some five years, a centre of beneficence in the district. She started a Sunday School, and a Bible Class after awhile for the lads too old for the school, who clamoured for admission to her class in it. She visited the poor, taking help wherever she went, and sending food from her own table to the sick It was characteristic of her that she would never give "scraps" to the poor, but would have a basin brought in at dinner, and would cut the best slice to tempt the invalid appetite. Money she rarely, if ever, gave, but she would find a day's work, or busy herself to seek permanent employment for anyone seeking aid. Stern in rectitude herself, and iron to the fawning or the dishonest, her influence, whether she was fearedor loved, was always for good. Of the strictest sect of the Evangelicals, she was an Evangelical. On the Sunday no books were allowed save the Bible or the "Sunday at Home"; but she would try to make the day bright by various little devices; by a walk with her in the garden; by the singing of hymns, always attractive to children; by telling us wonderful missionary stories of Moffat and Livingstone, whose adventures with savages and wild beasts were as exciting as any tale of Mayne Reid's'
In 1866 Fern Hill was rented to the palaeontologist Mr Harrison and his wife. Whilst living at Fern Hill Mr Harrison was digging at Black Ven (between Lyme Regis and Charmouth) and found the earliest British dinosaur which was named after him by Sir Richard Owen - The Scelidosaurus Harrisoni. Mr Harrison financed the build of the billiard room and the two bedrooms above.
The next tenant of Fern Hill was Sir Campbell Munro 3rd baronet of Lindertis who came to Fern Hill in 1868. Munro was married Henrietta Drummond of Fairfield House in Lyme Regis. They had 8 children and built the nursery wing. Then when they retired they moved back to Fairfield house leaving Fern Hill ready for its next tenant;
Major General John Eliot moved into Fern Hill in 1880. Major Eliot was key in creating the Charmouth tennis club, which was at first a squash club. Major Eliot wished to buy Fern Hill and offered £750 , The trustees Capt. Bullen and Dr Norris were keen to sell for this however the charity commissioners did not allow it as they did not regard £750 to be of an advantage to the charity. Following this the house fell into a great state of disrepair.
In 1891 Sir Lionel Smith Gordon was the last tenant of Fern hill whilst it was owned by the charity commissioners. After he left in 1901 the house was then finally sold on for a small sum to an unknown purchaser who then sold it on a few weeks later to Mr and Mrs Kennedy making a profit of £300.
Mr and Mrs Kennedy spent a great deal of time and money bringing Fern Hill up to modern requirements as the sanitation in the house was primitive and the kitchen chimney ran the whole length of the house and was cleaned by a cannon ball. Whilst living at Fern Hill Mr Kennedy accidently shot and killed a local farmer's son whilst shooting rabbits at Befferlands Farm in Whitchurch Canonicorum.
During 1929 the circus was passing Fernhill and the trailer containing one of the lions became detached from the vehicle pulling it and rolled down the road crashing into a tree which allowed the lion to escape around Fernhill and eventually ended up at Lily Farm where it was shot but not before causing mayhem with a local cow! It's not known what tree it hit but it could very well be the big tree at the bottom of the drive.
Mrs Kennedy left Fernhill in 1950 and it was at this time that Fernhill stopped being a private residence and became a hotel.1951 Hebe & Annie Lang
1952 Henry & Margaret Carmichael
1953 Henry & Emily Wickham 195? Brought by Mr & Mrs Colby
In the 1950's pupils used to regularly come up to Fernhill to collect all the leaves to be able to use as fertiliser on the allotments at the school.
1957 Sold by Mr and Mrs Colby at auction
1957 Annie Grove
1961 Hugh and Sarah Mace
In 1962 Fernhill Hotel was advertised as having 17 bedrooms, 12 acres of woodlands, tennis court, croquet, riding and boating.
1964 J.S Greenhaugh
1964 Dennis & Betty Dungey
1965 Duncan & Joan MacKinnon
1971 ???? — I ^\^<-'


Fernhill on the left in 1924
A few Notes on the North West endofCharmouth
and
Some of the people who have lived there
R.W.J. PAVEY October. 1968
[EXTRACT}
A motorist coming to Charmouth from Lyme would come
down Fernhill, which was
the old coach road between Bridport and Axminster before
1832 when the Tunnel was
opened. Fernhill then ceased to be used by traffic and
gradually deteriorated. The
hedges were overgrown with ferns and wild flowers, the trees
overhanging the
fairway grew unchecked and the surface of the road became a
green trackway.
Fernhill was then known as Fernhill Lane. Then in 1924, with
the closing of the coast
road to Lyme, Fernhill came to life again. The bend at the top
was widened, the
gradient made easier for traffic and the corner where it joins
the Axminster road was
cut back by many feet.
I
A curious legend became associated with the Lane during the
1890s. Several people
A r
said that they had seen a white rabbit ruacross the road.
Holman Kirbey, the
doctor's son, declared that his stick went through it when it
*T
was hit; and a lady
inquired if anyone in the Village had lost a white rabbit. In
fact, Fernhill Lane was