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Sir John Hawkshaw (1811- 1891)

An exciting find! - a link with Charmouth`s famous Lord of The Manor – Sir John Hawkshaw (1811-1891). 
I recently purchased a metal plaque with the inscription " Presented by J. Hawkshaw, Esq. to the Charmouth Cricket Club 1865". The name rang bells to me as that of the famous engineer who had once tried to link Charmouth, Lyme Regis and Bridport with a railway that would have joined the main line at Chard. He was probably the most famous national figure apart from King Charles II to be associated with the village. What made it so exiting was the plaque was given by him to Charmouth so long ago and by a miracle has survived. It was not until I went to The British Newspapers Archives website which has a database of most papers since they were published, that I was able to solve the mystery as to what it was. For the "Bridport News" on the 1st July of that year under Cricket Club reported that:
 “We have much pleasure in announcing that Mr. Hawkshaw has presented this Club a large iron roller, for the use of the ground. It has on it the following "Presented by J. Hawkshaw, Esq., to the Charmouth Cricket Club, 1865." Last Wednesday match was played between the Charmouth Cricket Club and an Eleven from Bridport”.
It would seem that the iron plate originally fitted on the front of this roller. It was the only memorial to this great engineer ever being in Charmouth. He ranked with Brunel in his many projects and unlike him lived a long and prosperous life dying in 1891 aged 80, leaving a fortune of over £220,000.
He in some ways unites those other famous Victorians who had such an impact on Charmouth at that time - Charles Fowler (1792-1867) architect of Covent Garden Market and St. Andrews Church and George Frean (1793- 1868) owner of a number of Mills including Charmouth and Lyme Regis Cement Works.
He was already a famous engineer when in 1864 he purchased three substantial estates in this area. The first was the Manor of Charmouth from George Frean which encompassed most of the fields south of The Street. The second was “Poulett House” and its grounds in Lyme Regis. He also bought Lily Farm in Charmouth from the trustees of The Bishop of Llandaff and other houses and fields in both places. His motivation was for a number of reasons including the creation of a country estate with “Poulett House”, now the Alexandra Hotel as its focus. But it was mainly for his ambition of constructing a Railway from Bridport Station (opened in 1857), through Charmouth, Lyme Regis and Axminster (opened in 1860) and linking it to the Main Line at Chard. If successful the value of his properties would have increased substantially as a result. At the time of the purchases he was renting Everleigh Manor, near Andover and had previously in 1863 stood as an unsuccessful Liberal Candidate there. A family friend who often stayed with him was John Gould the famous ornithologist. He was born in Lyme Regis where his father was the gardener at “Poulett House” and it was he who told John about the forthcoming sale of the Estate at that time owned by Colonel William Pinney who was standing down as the M.P. for Lyme Regis after 33 years. It was to give Hawkshaw the opportunity of returning to politics after just two years from his defeat at Andover after purchasing it. He was to offer the voters the promise of a new railway station and line linking it to the rest of Britain. Charmouth would also have a new station and line if successful. He set out to be a benevolent benefactor, especially in Charmouth, which formed part of the constituency. Here he was to design and build a water supply from a Reservoir he had built in a field on his land at Lily Farm. The Bridport News in June 1865 reported:
”Through the kindness and liberality of Mr Hawkshaw, a great boon is about to be conferred on this place, in the shape of a plentiful supply of pure water, in which. Indispensable, requesting Charmooth has hitherto been poorly off. For though nature has placed an abundance within easy reach, as yet no good method of distributing the precious gift had ever been adopted. the state of things is now to be remedied. Messrs Brown of Lyme, have contracted to build a tank, capable of holding 11,500 gallons of water, at the source of the spring known as the Grange, and to lay mains and provide public taps through the whole of the village. Any householder will be able, we understand, at a trifling expense, to have the water bought to his house”.
Taps were placed by the side of the Street for the use of those who did not possess a well and pump. There are still signs of these in the walls of properties in the village today.
He was also a generous landlord, for the Bridport News at the time wrote:
On Wednesday week last, John Hawkshaw Esq, lord of the manor, and owner of considerable property in Lyme Regis and Charmouth, held his half yearly rent audit at the Coach and Horses Hotel. The business being conducted by R. Hillman, Esq, solicitor, steward. There were present a large number of the principal tenants, both of Charmouth and Lyme Regis, who after the business was concluded, dined together, and afterward spent a very pleasant evening. On the occasion R. Hillman, Esq, occupied the chair, and Mr. Morcom, the vice Chair. The dinner was a most excellent spread, and was served by Mr. and Mrs. Hollys usual good style and gave the greatest satisfaction”. 
It was also reported that he gave every poor family a generous supply of coal. The large Iron Roller for The Cricket Club, was clearly another way he made villagers aware of his generosity, by having his name inscribed on the iron plate in its centre. The club had been formed just two years before and proved very popular with its weekly results appearing in the Bridport News. There were matches between neighbouring villages and towns as well as “Men against Women” and “Married against singles”. Two of Johns son`s played in the team which was then captained by Michael Morcom and no doubt he watched them play when in Charmouth.
The original plans for The Bridport, Lyme and Axminster Railway are kept at The Devon Archives in Exeter and are very detailed showing the route and cross sections of the countryside, with a tunnel at Penn Hill. There is a Record book that goes with it of the owners and occupiers of properties and fields it would pass through. John Hawkshaw signs himself as Consultant Engineer and Lord of the Manor of Charmouth. The previous Lord had been George Frean, from Plymouth who had bought the large Estate from John Liddon ten years before and had sold most of it off leaving just a number of fields and an unviable Cement Works near the beach which he then sold at a large profit to Hawkshaw who paid £8000 for it. The Charmouth Station would have been built on a field where the recreation ground at the back of The Street is today, then owned by Henry Compton, with its entrance at Barrs Lane. He was not the first to draw up a plan for a Railway for in 1846 Joseph Locke had submitted detail plans to Parliament for a line with a station behind the Catherston cottages for the Yeovil and Dorchester Railway. In the same year Isambard Kingdom Brunel planned a line linking Charmouth with Yeovil and Bridport for the Great Western. But both of these failed as money ran out after the period of Railway Mania that swept England. The Bridport News reported the new attempt in rather derogatory terms as follows:
There is again presented to us the bright and alluring vision of a railway for this district, but whether it is to assume actual shape or form, or, like its precursors, amuse us for a while, and then melt into thin air, I will not attempt to predict. The intended line is entitled the Bridport, Lyme, and South Coast Railway, and is to connect the Great Western at Bridport with the South-Western at a point about midway between Axminster and Chard, throwing off a branch at Whitchurch for Lyme. It is this branch which is to pass through this place. The first Charmouth Mead is the spot selected for that station. After passing Charmouth, the proposed line will make a considerable detour; the distance from Lyme, which is about two miles by the road, would be about four by the proposed rail. The only work of any difficulty in the neighbourhood would be a tunnel of 347 yards, between this and Lyme, and through the hill near Pen Inn. Pitcleaves, a field near the cemetery, it to be the terminus at Lyme. The maps and plans of so much as relates to this parish are now at the clerks for inspection, and a bill is to be brought into Parliament during next session. There can be no doubt but that a railway would be a very material benefit to us. and if it should be carried out as we hope it will, the beauties of Charmouth will then no doubt attract a large share of public attention”.
To assist Hawkshaw with his attempt to get support for the railway line in Charmouth he was to call on local business man, Michael Morcom, who ran the Cement Works that he owned, and who had previously rented it from his father in law, George Frean. The Bridport News later reported that:
“Mr Morcom, of Charmouth occupying the chair. Several gentlemen and tradesmen were present, and took great interest in the proceedings. Some very practical speeches were made, and there is every probability of the railway being constructed, as a portion of the intended line has been surveyed, and there is every reason to believe it is a bona fide affair, as the promoters as well as the inhabitants of both Charmouth and Lyme, see the necessity of a railway, and further, there is also a prospect of paying the shareholders a fair if not good dividend”.
This was just one of a number of  projects Hawkshaw was involved with at the time and many did not proceed either because parliamentary approval was refused, or because the necessary capital was not forthcoming from investors. In January 1864 the South Eastern Railway extension was opened from London Bridge to Charing Cross Station, including Hungerford Bridge across the River Thames. He was the Engineer for this project which involved the demolition of Hungerford Market, which had been designed by Charles Fowler. Charing Cross Station was built on the site of Fowlers early work. The former bridge that lead to the Market, designed by Brunel was replaced by Hawkshaw with the present Bridge. Material from this was re-used to finish Brunel`s Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol which remained unfinished after his early death. Charles Fowler specialised in Markets and he designed those in Covent Garden, Tavistock, as well as the Lower and Upper ones in Exeter. He also designed a number of Churches including St. Andrews in Charmouth. His family was associated with the village and both his mother and aunt lived here and have memorials in the church.
John Hawkshaw also designed the bridge over Narmada River, India, was engineer of Amsterdam ship canal (1862) and wrote a report on the route chosen for the Suez Canal (1863). He designed a number of docks including the Albert Dock at Hull and the West India Dock in London. He was also the consultant engineer on the Severn Tunnel and was the engineer for the first Channel Tunnel. Another link with Charmouth is that of Edward Hartsinck Day, a resident of Charmouth who assisted him with the geological investigations on each side of the Channel between 1865 and 1867. He later left for America and was Assay Master in the Columbia College School of Mining. During his time in Charmouth he found a complete Plesiosaurus from the Lower Lias at Charmouth, which was purchased by the British Museum. 
The election for Lyme Regis and Charmouth was to be on July12th1865, but Hawkshaw was prevented just two weeks before from standing due to his holding a government appointment as the Engineer to the government funded harbour at Holyhead. Undeterred his 24-year-old son John Clarke who had just finished at Cambridge University stood instead. After a campaign lasting just eight days, he lost the contest, but by only nine votes. He actually won by 92 votes to 87 in Lyme Regis, but lost by 15 to 29 in Charmouth, which was decisive. He later wrote of the experience:
“Lyme Regis was a most corrupt borough and was very properly disenfranchised later on. The people had lived for years on smuggling and elections. Charmouth formed part of the borough for voting purposes and I heard after the election that then were only eleven electors there who were not bribed. I lunched at one house where, after lunch they asked £100 for their vote”.
After getting his degree at Cambridge he joined his fathers practice in London and worked with him on many important projects. In the same years he married Cicely Wedgwood daughter of Francis Wedgwood, grandson of Josiah Wedgwood,founder of the famous pottery firm. Francis’s sister Emma Wedgwood married her cousin  Charles Darwin. This family connection and the close proximity to the Jurassic Coast must have fostered his love of collecting fossils. His fine collection still exists and is on display in his original cabinet at Haslemere Museum in Surrey and contains a fine Ichthyosaur from Charmouth.
The Hawkshaws had before the year was out to not only lost the election, but failed in their attempt to get parliamentary approval for their railway due to opposition from Great Western Railway and London and South Western Railway companies. Undeterred by the setback the following year John finally bought a country Estate at Hollycombe in Surrey and then attempted to sell his substantial properties in both Lyme Regis and Charmouth. There was to be an Auction in July 1867, but it was postponed until September of that year. The original catalogue for the sale can be seen in the Dorset Archives and is very comprehensive and contains some fine maps of both Charmouth and Lyme Regis.
An extract from the newspaper report afterwards records:
 “The Sale of Mr. Hawkshaw's property - this important sale by auction took place at the Assembly Rooms in Lyme Regis on Tuesday 10th September, under the direction of Messrs, Driver and Co., of 4, Whitehall, London. For some of the properties the competition was spirited, but several lots still remain unsold. In Lyme, Lot 1, Paulett House and grounds adjoining, purchased by H.F.Ingram, Esq. for £3000. In Charmouth - Lot 21,Lilly Farm offered £3150, reserve price £4000. Lot 30, The Drang, let to the executors of the late George Payne, sold for £210. Lot 31, Manor of Langmoor, not sold, reserve price, £4000”. 
Other lots raised a further £4,430. Many failed to reach reserve price, however, and properties valued at £16,750 including the coastguard buildings, boat-building premises and shipyard went unsold. The Manor of Langmoor referred to above was actually the Cement Works and the fields around. It was not until it was bought by John James Coulton, four years later that they were able to dispose of this lot. It was this gentleman who also bought The Drang and later attempted to build a housing Estate on the land in Higher Sea Lane. Lily Farm was to remain with the Hawkshaws until it was finally sold in 1914 at a much lower price than it was originally offered at.
Their friend and tenant, Michael Morcom gave up the Cement Works in 1872 and returned to Plymouth and the building found new uses as storage for fishing nets, bathing machines and tents by the Hunter family who rented it from Coulton.
There follows a list of just some of the schemes Hawkshaw was involved with during his short time in Charmouth from Martin Beaumont`s recent publication on the life of the eminent engineer.
1864     He purchased properties in Lyme Regis & Charmouth. Lord of the Manor of Charmouth. Mini "Railway Mania': numerous abortive railway schemes proposed including Hawkshaw's Bridport, Lyme &Axminster Railway. John Clarke Hawkshaw (his son) joined firm; sent to Egypt to report on first cataract of the Nile.
January 11th     Opening of SER extension from London Bridge Station to Charing Cross Station, including Hungerford Bridge across River Thames.
August 7th   To Russia 'where I have large works in progress.' (Dunaburg & Witepsk Railway).
December 8th    Opening of Clifton Suspension Bridge, Bristol.
December   Hawkshaw became Trustee of new Institute of Civil Engineers Benevolent Fund with J Fowler & J R McClean.
1864-85 Consulting Engineer to Jamaica Railway.
1865 Investigated geology of sea-bed between Britain and France.
January 21st Lieutenant Colonel, Engineer and Railway Staff Volunteer Corps,(subsequently Colonel Commandant from 1878 until his death in 1891).
July 13th Lyme Regis election - ineligible. Son Clarke stood instead and lost by 9 votes.
October 12th John Clarke Hawkshaw married Cecily Wedgwood, sister of Godfrey Wedgwood and niece of Charles & Emma Darwin.
December 3rd Collapse of Sturges Meek's new stone viaduct at Mytholmbridge, intended to replace Hawkshaw's timber trestle viaduct of 1849.
1865-69 Constructed East London Railway through Marc Brunei's Thames Tunnel from Wapping to New Cross.
1866 Advised on design of roof structure for the Royal Albert Hall.
June Bought Hollycombe, West Sussex.
September 1st Opening of City Terminus Extension of the Charing Cross Railway to Cannon Street.
1866-1870 South Dock of the East & West India Dock Company, London (opened 5 March 1870)
1867 September 10th – His Charmouth and Lyme Regis Estate auctioned.
Looking back at the brief time Hawkshaw was associated with Charmouth one has to reflect on what would have happened if his efforts had succeeded in 1865. John or his son would have been our Member of Parliament with tremendous influence with the many projects they were involved with. Lyme Regis would have had their railway instead of waiting until 1903 for it. We would also have had our station, although we would have lost the Playing Fields as that was where it was to be built. At the same time John Hawkshaw knew that with the railway would come expansion of both places and the qualities that we appreciate today of a village would have been lost.

Plan of route of proposed railway line linking Lyme Regis, Bridport, Charmouth with Axminster in 1864
Plan of the section of the line at Charmouth
The Charmouth section with the line running parallel to the Street in the area which now forms the playing fields behind the shops. A Station was planned for it, with access by the side of the Post Office along Barrs Lane.
The cover of the Reference Book for the planned railway with John Hawshaw as Consulting Engineer.
Sir John Hawkshaw (1811- 1891)
Sir John Hawkshaw (1811- 1891)
A Map showing the proposed route of the Bridport, Lyme & Axminster which included a station at Charmouth in 1864 An artists impression of how Charmouth Station may have looked.
The 1864 Reference Book Shows Sir John Hawkshaw as Lord of the Manor of Charmouth
Sir John Hawkshaw (1811- 1891)

John Hawkshaw was the Chief Engineer and consultant employed by the Great Western Railway Company to monitor progress on the Severn Tunnel excavations by Thomas Walker. This engraving shows him carried along the unfinished tunnel in a tram. Interior of Charing Cross Station showing trains and the iron roof, London, c1860. The terminus of the South Eastern Railway was designed by John Hawkshaw and opened in 1864.
Isambard Kingdom Brunel`s Proposal for Railway to Charmouth -1846
Joseph Locke`s Proposal for Railway to Charmouth -1846
Joseph Locke`s Proposal for Railway to Charmouth -1846 Joseph Locke`s Proposal for a Railway, with its station at the rear of Catherstone cottages.
LYME REGIS RAILWAY Proposed route for an Extension to Bridport dated November 1874 following along the shore from Lyme Regis through to Charmouth The proposed route through Charmouth to the west of the Heritage Centre
A map of the Railway Lines operating in 1924 showing lines to both Bridport and Lyme Regis, but still no connection with Charmouth,
the projected railway. —There is again presented to us the bright and alluring vision of a railway for this distinct, but whether it is to assume actual shape or form, or, like its precursors, amuse ns for a while, and then melt into thin air, I will not attempt to pre­dict.    The intended line is entitled the Bridport. Lyme, and South Coast Railway, and is to connect the Great Western at Bridport with   the   South-Western at a point about midway between Axminster and Chard , throwing off a branch at Whitchurch for Lyme. It is this branch which is to pass through this place, The first Charmouth mead is the spot selected far that station.    After passing Charmouth, the proposed line will   make a considerable detour; the distance   from Lyme, which is about two miles by the road, would be about four by the proposed rail.   The only work of any difficulty in the neighbourhood would be a tunnel of 347 yards, between this and Lyme, and through the hill near Pen Inn. Pitcleaves, a field near the cemetery, it to be the terminus at Lyme.     The maps and plans of so much as relates to this parish are now at the clerk's for inspection, and a bill is to be brought into Parliament during next session.     There can be no doubt but that a railway would be a very material benefit to us. and if it should be carried out as we hope it will, the beauties of Charmouth will then no doubt attract a large share of public attention- December 19th 1865
The Map from the Auction Catalogue for 1867 showing the Charmouth Estate for sale by Driver and Co. in London.
Lot 30 is the Drang which sold on the day, whereas Lot no 31 did not sell until 1871.
On the left of this painting by Lucy Rossetti can be seen one of the standing taps along the street from the water system installed by Sir John Hawkshaw in 1865.
John Clarke Hawkshaw, son of Sir John Hawkshaw.

The Iron Plate would have fitted where the circular one in the centre is shown in this engraving above.

London Brighton & South Coast Railway B2 class 4-4-0 number 324 John Hawkshaw
The gravestones of Sir John Hawkshaw and his wife Ann - Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Bramshott.
25th November 1864
Two of the places on the Street which still have the brick insets in their walls where the stand pipes and taps were available to take the water from. The waterworks were a great benefit to the place and the thanks of the inhabitants were expressed to Mr. John Hawkshaw, Lord of the Manor, for coming forward so liberally in the matter. (Pullmans Weekly 29 June, 1865). Taps were placed by the side of the Street for the use of those who did not possess a well and pump. Only two sites are visible today; on the Axniinster Road in the wall of Springfield garden and outside the Doctor's house. Elsewhere they were at the foot of Lyme Hill; outside "Omega" - opposite Charmouth House; outside "The Court"; below the Manor House; in the lane leading to the stables; in the hedge of the builder's yard where the bank is now situated; and two others further down. Water was gradually introduced into the houses.
An early photograph, c.1870 showing the old Cement Works, which was bought with the surrounding fields by John Hawkshaw in 1864 from George Frean for £6000.
Another early photograph of the Old Cement works.
An early photograph of the Old Cement Works which was used to store Bathing Machines in the winter months by the Hunter family.

Lily Farm that was bought by Sir John Hawkshaw in 1864 and remained in his family until 1914.
Poullet House, now the Alexandra Hotel, which was bought by Sir John Hawkshaw from Colonel William Pinney M.P. in 1864
The Great Western Railway Coach that would pick up passengers from Bridport Station and take them to Charmouth and Lyme Regis, before they had their own Stations. Here it is seen outside the Bull Hotel in Bridport.
It was not until 1903, that Lyme Regis was to finally have its own Station. Here it is seen on opening day.
An early view of Axminster Station which opened in 1860.
The Time Table for Bridport staion soon after it opened in 1857. the train to London left at 8.10 and arrived at 4.55 in the afternoon.
The GWR coach outside the Coach and Horses Inn in Charmouth c. 1890
The photograph is very early and probably taken by local School Master Mr. Bottomley and depicts the last day of the service in 1860. The Western Gazete for 16th October 1858 reports   "This pretty little fashionable watering place, which is provided with nearly every trade and profession has just added to its list of professors that of Photographic Artist", in the person of Mr. J. Bottomley, schoolmaster, whose ability and taste have already displayed themselves in the specimens that he has taken ".
The coronet coach ran between Bridport and Exeter from February 1858 till the summer of 1860 when the opening of the L.S.W Railway to Exeter brought the service to an end.It left the Bull Hotel Bridport at 11.30 a.m. Arriving at Pratts Hotel in Exeter at 5pm. In the reverse direction departure from Exeter was at 10.am Bridport beng reached at 3p.m. The fares between Bridport and Exeter were : inside 12/- Outside 8/-. The driver of the coach was called Tiny, the post boy was Dam Biles.,who afterwards kept the Star Inn opposite. Fred Wild, in the white waistcoat, was the uncle of Henry Wild and met all the coaches. Reg. Pavey had the information concering this historic photograpg from William Holly, a Landlord of the Inn.
The GWR coach outside the Coach and Horses Inn in Charmouth c.1910
The late Mr. W.A. Hart on the first engine on Bridport Branch in the year 1857. The. Hill in the background is Conegar Hill and this would have been Bradpole Road Station.
Mr. Morcom of Plymouth had a 21 year lease and was paying £100 a year rent for a Cement Mill, a Stone and Slated Building, with two floors, lean to, and two kilns. On top of the rent there were royalties of 1s 6d per ton on Cement,1s per ton on unmanufactured Stone,1s per ton on Manganese, and 2s per 1000 on all Bricks,Tiles and other like articles manufactured by the Lessee. But sadly the business never took off and may well have contributed to George Freans decision to sell his Estate to John Hawkshaw on January 1 1864 for £6000. This was precisely 10 years from the day he had bought his property in Charmouth from the Liddons.
The last Liddon to live there was Matthew, who died in 1864, when the Manor was sold to John Hawkshaw, the famous Engineer, who sold it to John J. Coulton in 1871, neither of whom appear to have lived there. 
26 July 1864 - Sherborne Mercury
"Railway Accommodation being very much needed at Charmouth and Lyme Regis, a company has been formed for he purpose of constructing a line from Chard Road to Lyme Regis, with a branch to Charmouth, from Penn Inn. A meeting for the purpose of discussing the matter was held on Wednesday evening, the 13th instant, at Lyme Regis, F.Hinton, Esq, Mayor, in the chair, when a large number of gentlemen, tradesmen, &c., of Lyme and Charmouth were present, and on the following evening, another meeting took place at Charmouth. Mr Morcombe, of Charmouth, occupying the chair. Several gentlemen and tradesmen were present, and took practical speeches were made, and here is a fair probability of the railway being constructed, as a portion of the intended line has been surveyed, and there is every reason to believe it is bona fide affair, as the promoters, as well as the inhabitants of both Charmouth and Lyme, see the great necessity of a railway, and furer there is a prospect of paying the shareholders a fair if not good dividend".   1864
 
" The projected railway There is again presented to us the bright and alluring vision of a railway for his district, but whether it is to assume actual shape or form, or like its precursors, amuse us for awhile, and them melt into thin air.I will not attempt to predict. The intended line is entitled the "Bridport, Lyme and South Coast Railway", and is to connect the Great Western at Bridport with the South Western at a point about midway between Axminster and Chard Road, throwing off a branch at Whitchurch for Lyme.It is this branch which will pass through this place. The first Charmouth Mead is the spot selected for the station. After passing Charmouth, the proposed line will make a considerable detour, the distance fom Lyme , which is about two miles by the road, would be about four by the proposed rail.The only work of any difficulty in the neighbourhood would be a tunnel of 847 yards, between this and Lyme, and through the hill, near Penn Inn. Pitleaves, a field near the cemetery, is to be the Terminus at Lyme. The maps and plans of so much as relates to this parish are now at the clerk' s office for inspection, and a bill is to be brought to parliament during the next session. There can be no doubt but that a railway would be a very material benefit to us, and if it should be carried out, as we hope it will, the beauties of Charmouth will then, no doubt, attract a large share of public attention."  1865
 
12 January 1865 - Dorset County Chronicle
Bridport/18 February 1865 - Bridport News
Bridport/18 February 1865 - Bridport News
04 March 1865 - Bridport News - Bridport,
Bridport/29 April 1865 - Bridport News
03 June 1865 - Bridport News 
17 June 1865 - Bridport News
10 June 1865 - Bridport News 
20 June 1865 - Sherborne Mercury - Sherborne, Dorset, England
The first sod of the waterworks was cut on June 15th by Mrs. Norris, the wife of Dr. H. E. Norris. A band was in attendance and the village was decorated with flags. The company repaired to a field, where wine and beer were distributed to drink success to the undertaking. Dancing afterwards commenced and was kept up with much spirit for some time. The waterworks were a great benefit to the place and the thanks of the inhabitants were expressed to Mr. John Hawkshaw, Lord of the Manor, for coming forward so liberally in the matter. (Pullmans Weekly 29 June, 1865). Taps were placed by the side of the Street for the use of those who did not possess a well and pump. Only two sites are visible today; on the Axniinster Road in the wall of Springfield garden and outside the Doctor's house. Elsewhere they were at the foot of Lyme Hill; outside "Omega" - opposite Charmouth House; outside "The Court"; below the Manor House; in the lane leading to the stables; in the hedge of the builder's yard where the bank is now situated; and two others further down. Water was gradually introduced into the houses.
01 July 1865 - Bridport News 
08 July 1865 - Bridport News 
08 July 1865 - Bridport News
15 July 1865 - Bridport News
29 July 1865 - Bridport News 
05 August 1865 - Bridport News
"John C. Hawkshaw, Esq., paid this place a visit on the 25 August and called on his votes and many friends and cordially thanked them, and the church bell rang on he occasion. Waterworks - We have much pleasure in saying that these works, so liberally presented to Charmouth by that eminent engineer and large landowner, John Hawkshaw, Esq., are fast approaching completion, and when finished, will be one of the greatest boons ever conferred on the inhabitants.  
Cricket Match- on Thursday last, the 27th ult., a match was played at his ace between an eleven from Lyne Regis and an eleven of the Charmouth Cricket Club, which terminated in favour of Charmouth, who beat the opponents by 82 runs. The following are the totals of the score: Charmouth, first innings,26, second innings 49, second ditto, 86. Lyme, first innings,26, second, ditto, 27.
A large number of people were present in the field among whom were J.W. Treeby, Esq., M.P. and family. Mr Holly of the Coach and Horses Hotel supplied refreshments under the tent in the field." 

August 1865
25 July 1865 - Sherborne Mercury - Sherborne, Dorset, England
29 June 1867 - Bridport News 
30 November 1865 - Dorset County Chronicle - Dorchester, Dorset, England
13 December 1866 - Dorset County Chronicle - Dorchester, Dorset,
14 September 1867 - Bridport News -
19 September 1867 - Dorset County Chronicle 
25th July 1867
 
12 December 1868 - Bridport News