Hillside
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one, two and three "Hillside" in 1923
one, two and three "Hillside" in 1923

On the north side of the Street and opposite to "The Elms" are one, two and three "Hillside". Three period houses of the nineteenth century. In 1320 William, Abbot of Forde,wishing to improve his manor of Charmouth, invited persons to build on parcels of land, 20 perches by 4, paying for each parcel 3 pence annually. Roberts in his history of Charmouth mentions this and remarked that the sites, on which the houses on the north side of the village were built, appeared to be of singular breadth and depth. The gardens of the three houses we are discussing are almost identical and so are those already described, when you take into account 'The Court' garden belonged originally to three cottages. The gardens from 'Omega'to 'The Limes' are bounded on the north side by a stone wall, which has been called by some people "The monks' wall"
All three houses were known as "Follett's and Tibb's Tenements " and in 1736 were owned by Jacob Burrow, blacksmith, and others.. Edward Farr died in 1795 he he had married Elizabeth Burrows in 1772 Elizabeth , was daughter of Jacob Burrows born in 1744. On Burrow's death Farr became owner and the property was called "Farr's Tenements", except a piece of land 80 ft. in length by 7ft. 6 inches in width, which was sold to William Juson, owner of Backlands Farm and the fields beyond. This became the right of way between No. 1 and the farm. Several owners followed and in 1822 these were: Catherine Williams, niece of the Rev. Brian Combe, Joseph Wilson of Lyme, and James Templer of Bradpole. Joseph Wilson agreed to put up a hedge or good boundary fence between the properties and shortly afterwards a stone wall was erected.
All three houses were built in 1827 by Joseph Wilson (born 1793 in Lyme Regis), who had bought the plot in 1822.

"No.l Hillside ". No. 50 Large Double Flat Topped Tomb with iron railings removed.
EMILY SUSANNA CLEAVE/died February 18 th 1842/aged 43/Also of Mrs ELIZABETH CLEAVE/mother of the above and/relict of the late/JOHN CLEAVE Esqre/of (Newton Crediton)/who died on the 16 th day of January 1838/aged 101 years.
On 16th September 1837 Miss Harriot Prior of Lyme purchased No. 1 (then in the occupation of Mrs Cleaves of Charmouth) for £875 from Joseph Wilson, the deed was witnessed by the Misses Templer, cousins. Since then the property has been owned and occupied by the Prior and Templer families. The last to live there was Miss L.K. Prior, who sold it to Canon and Mrs. Whittington, and on the death of the Canon it was purchased by "the Ecclesiastical Commissioners in 1953 and was then Charmouth Rectory . Miss Harriot Templer was the last Templer to live there and was the last person to be buried in Charmouth Churchyard in 1903. All three houses have curved doors in the front sitting rooms and there are gardener's cottages belonging to each.
No.37 Upright with Celtic Cross on top.
CAROLINE BARBARA/Daughter of WILLIAM TEMPLER/of Weymouth/Born Septr.l 8 * 1824/Died June 14 th 1880/"Looking Unto Jesus".
Upright with Celtic Cross on Top.
HARRIOT/Daughter of RICHARD PRIOR/of Clapham Surrey/Born Jany. 3 rd 1778,/Died April 27 th 1861./Also her Niece/HARRIOT ELIZ A/daughter of WILLIAM TEMPLER/Born May 16 th 1825/Died Septr. 25 th 1903/"Them also that are fallen asleep in Jesus/Will God bring with him". + Pryer & Son.

"No. 2 Hillside" This house was owned in 1831 by Benjamin Jeanes, dissenting minister and on his death his widow took possession and in 1842 sold it to George Laurie for £820 purchased by Trust Funds. In 1867 it was put up for public auction and bought by the Misses Poulson for £700. When Sarah Poulson died Margaret Maria became sole owner. On her death it was left to Julie and Mary Trenchard and on their death to William Matthew Flinders Petrie. But on 7th October 1890 the Misses Trenchard purchased Petrie` s reversionary interest for £100. Margaret Poulson died in June 1890, When the Misses Trenchard inherited, repairs required were considerable, the property having been bought in 1867 and since then no painting or repairs had been done, and as the premises were very dilapidated it was necessary to spend £l00 at once. On the turn of the century No. 2 was a girls' School kept by Miss Cookson. Later Sir Cecil Harrison, son of J.W. Harrison of Little Hurst stayed, here and owned the first motor car in the village � a De Dion Bouton. This was not the first motor 'seen' in Charmouth. Alfred Hodges, born here in 1894 left Charmouth in 1916 for Canada, where he became a successful grocer. He returned to Charmouth for the first time in June 1960. He told rne that he remembers the school being sent out by Mr. Jones to see the first motor car ever seen in Charmouth (a wagon without horses). It stuck on the hill and the boys helped to push it up and were each given a penny. No 2 Hillside in about 1930 was once again a Girls` School kept by Mrs. Measures. For a few years Mrs. Gilbert was the owner and in about 1958-9 it was sold to Prince Charles de Rohan. Prince de Rohan was born at Folkestone in 1894, he was descended from the French noble family - the de Rohans records of which exist from 1118 A.D. During the French Revolution the de Rohans settled in Austria. Charles de Rohan was sent to Siberia by the Russians during the first world war and arrested by the Nazis during the second world War, when his estates were confiscated. He came to Charmouth in about 1958. His family repaid the debt of honour incurred by Cardinal Louis de Rohan, who was duped by Madame de la Motte Valois over Queen Marie Antoinette's necklace. The cost of the necklace was paid off in instalments by the family over a period of nearly a hundred years. The last payment being made in the early nineties of last century to the descendants of the jewellers, Bohmer and Bassenge. ("The Queen's Necklace" by Frances Messiker). The Prince died on 16th April 1965 and Princess de Rohan sold the house shortly afterwards. It has since then changed hands again.

"No.3 Hillside" In 1849 No. 3 was sold to Captain William Mould and was occupied by James Harrison, the well known geologist,and in 1866 by James Wilson a surgeon. The next, owner was Samuel Potter, solicitor, who bought it for £750 in 1875. After him was Henry Eliot, son of General Eliot of Fernhill, who had just returned from Canada, where he had met Buffalo Bill. When Buffalo Bill visited England with his Wild West Show, Eliot went to see him and asked if he remembered him. Buffalo Bill replied that he was unable to do so, and Eliot begged him to lend him his hat. With the wide-brimmed cow boy hat on his head he was at once recognised. Henry Eliot was a great horseman and used to break in horses harnessed to a light-cart on the beach. I can remember him driving backward and forwards on the sand between the Factory and Black Ven. He left the house to his daughter Katie, whose brother Winthrop and his family lived there for some time. In 1922 John, Grandson of Henry Eliot was tragically drowned in the River Charmouth. The house was later was bought by Carpenter Turner, architect to Winchester Cathedral. Whose tenant was Bishop A.W. Williams, formerly Headmaster of Winchester and later Bishop of Winchester, Bishop Williams died in 1968.

Fernhill deeds 1753 sold by Jacob Burrow, blacksmith to Samuel Burrow, blacksmith for £60 all that piece of ground earlier enclosed by Edward Mabel. Of about 3 acres converted into an orchard lying at Langmoor and adjoining lands formerly of John Burridge, esq. lately purchased by Jacon Burrow with other lands of Thomas Rose,esq (Hill Side) who had purchased with other lands from Elizabeth Mabel and Thomasin Mabell, spinsters and daughters of Edward Mabell, who was brother of John Mabell deceased.
In 1760 Samuel Burrow sold to Walter Oke of Axmouth, gentleman,for £400, "all that piece of ground" mentioned above and also that other orchard, common burgess or "acre of ground" formerly in Tenure of George Coins also that Tenement called "Manns Tenement" consisting of a dwelling house, two gardens , an orchard. "Two fields of Meadow and one field of pasture" for the residue of 2000 years which commenced 27th April 1573 and also that Tenement or Inn called "The George Inn" with the Curtlage, garden orchard and backside for the residue of 1000 years which commenced 25th March 1703.Also all that messuage known by the name of "The Rose and Crown" with the curtelage, garn and orchard for the residue of another term of  years which commenced on 29th November 1725 and also that other messuage wherein Samuel Burrow now lives for the residue of 1900 years which commenced 10thApril 1599".
6 Pieces of land were sold by Samuel Burrow to Walter Oke for £400

1599 A later deed refers to a 2000 year lease beginning in thia year on 10th April. This may well have formed part of the Manor of Charmouth, which would have been owned by Sir William Pole(1561-1635) who lived at Shute Barton, near Axminster. THe fmaily still owned the Mill and lands around it until the 18th Century.
1648 between Joseph Hazzard  of Charmouth, Mercahnt and Judith Miller of the same, widow of the other part for the sum of £50  paid by the said Judith Miller one messuage commonly called or known by the Rose and Crown with the curtelage, garden, orchard in charmouth,late in the occupation of William Lymbry , the inheritance of Edward Lymbry, deceased bounced with the Streete in Charmouth  on the south part and with part of the said messuage the land of Stephen Baker on the west part thereof and a messuage now in the occupation of John Follett on the east part thereof.he grants  
Signed Henry Kinder, Richard Golding, John Kinder dd/AL 29/4
1674 Edward Mabell of Charmouth, soap boiler 2) George Cominge of Charmouth, silk weaver. House and lands in Charmouth. Mentioned: Neithewoods Meadow.. Mentioned: Thomas Jenkins of Beerhull, Axminster, Devon, yeoman & Buthshua his wife, Thomas Treegkey of Charmouth, mariner, Thomas Carter. Witnesses: Joseph Bragge, Simon Orchard, Robert Payne and Agnes Tanner.Assignment of lease. D1-MC/139
Marker's or the Poor's Charity. Deeds of ground enclosed by Edward Mabell containing 3 acres, which was converted into an orchard at Langmoore, and another orchard; pedigree of Oke family; letter 1837; notes on charity by R W J Pavey. PE-CMO/CH/4
Edward Hammond ,clerk master of arts, church deacon ray of Dorset lawfully constituted to William Hutchins otherwise Chapple and Samuel Burrow, principle creditors of James Parsons late of Charmouth . He died intestate in 1738  and goods and chattels got to above.DD/AL29/7
Messuage, burgage, tenement, or dwellinghouse on North side of the great street, called the Rose and Crown. The premises were conveyed by the Rev. Nathaniel Bull of Studland, Dorset, to Edward Lymbry, senior, of   Charmouth , in 1629, and by him conveyed to Richard Talbot of Broadmayne, Dorset (whose daughter Joan married Francis, son of Richard Talbot) in 1639. Joseph Hassard of Charmouth   conveyed them to Judith Miller of the same in 1649, and she conveyed them to Francis Hodder, junior, of Wootton Fitzpaine, in 1644, in consideration of the intended marriage of her daughter Judith Miller and the said Hodder. By 1753 the premises were held by Samuel Burrow of   Charmouth , who conveyed them, inter alia, to Walter Oke of Pinney, Axmouth, Devon, as further security for a mortgage. Deeds of 1753 and 1756 refer also to a messuage and tenement, orchard, etc. (1a), on North side of street; orchard (3a) at Langmoore; messuage or dwellinghouse with garden and orchard in East Eipe (1a), parcel of a tenement called Brown's Tenement; several [named] closes (9a); orchard commonly reputed a burgage or acre of ground; and the George Inn. Bundle includes probate of will of William Lymbry of   Charmouth , yeoman , dated and proved 1674; administration of estate of James Parsons of   Charmouth , 1737; bond for payment of ?200 and interest by Barbara Smith of Blandford St Mary to Walter Oke of South Petherton, et al, 1769.
DD/AL29/9
This indenture made in 1757 between Jacob Burrow of Charmouth,Blacksmith and Elizabeth, his wife , John Goreing of Charmouth, Innholder and Leah, his wife for the first part. Robert Collins of Lorton within the parish of Hunister in Somerset, Clothier, and Robert Colbert of Charmouth,Gentleman of the second part Samuel Burrow of Charmouth , Blacksmith of the third part and Moses Lee of East Eype , within Symondsbury , Yeoman of the forth part... All that Messuage and Tenement consisting of a dwelling house, stable, Garden and Orchard containing in the whole an acre situate in Charmouth on the north side of the Street there late in the tenure of the said Robert Colbert and one Ralph Gorge as Tenants to the said John Goreing , but now in the possession of him the said Robert Colbert, who hath lately purchased  it fromJohn Goreing. And also that orchard , formerly a piece of Ground enclosed by one Edward Mabell, deceased containing  3 acres lying at Langmore in Charmouth , adjoining to the lands formerly of John Burridge , esq.and now in the possession of Samuel Burrow who lately purchased the same and the freehold from the said Jacob Burrow. And also that dwelling house with the garden and orchard belonging in East Eype containing 1 acre called Browns Tenement  and now in the possession of Moses Lee who lately purchased it from Jacob Burrow. And also those several closes of land, meadows and pasture, that's is one close called Four Acres , three parcels of land containing one acre called Rye Acre, 2 acres of land lying in a field called Nastor field and a close containing an acre south part of Goosemoors belonging to browns Tenement lying in East Eype lately purchased from Jacob Burrows by Robert Collins. Signed Jacob Burrows, Elizabth Burrows, John Porvis, Leah Goreing.
Edward Mabell died in 1699. The 1754 Poor Rates List show Richard Henvill, Lord of the Manor for Mabells. It would seem for awhile that all three estates would be owned by the Henvill family. In the 1754 Poor Rates Richard Henvill Esq is shown as paying 4d for Mabells (Newlands). There are a number of references in the Parish records in the 17th and 18th centuries to the family who farmed the estate called Mabell, and there is a will in the Dorset Record Office to an Edward Mabell who died in 1699. He is also shown in 1664 paying Hearth Tax on his house with 3 chimneys, which may well have been the building now known as Stonebarrow Manor.
But by 1783 all the Estates were sold by Francis Phipps Henvill to clear debts he had ammased. Cathertson was bought by William Drewe of New Inn, London, Charmouth by James Warden and the Rev. Brian Coombes.
1737 Register of Apprentices shows Samuel Burrow, Blacksmith employong James, son of James Parsons.
1754 Poor Rates list show Samuel Burow owning Parsons Estate, Watterses, Hodders and the George. His own house, Burgage and Langmore. Parsons - refers to James Parsons Estate, Hodders is the Rose and Crown Inn, George is The George Inn. Walterses (Walter Okes) must be the Elms, then known as Manns. His house, burgage and Langmoor are retained when he sells the rest to Walter Oke for £400 in 1760.
Mr Jacob Burrow showmn in 1754 as paying Poor Rates on his own house and Trevats (?). it also shows the fields that he owned at Langmoor in Charmouth.
DD/AL 29/8  
1753 assignment of 2 dwelling houses and several closes of ground in Charmouth or remainder of 2000 years for securing £320 and interest. Samuel Borrow to Nicholas Warren Esq, in trust for Walter Oke.  
Between Walter Oke of Pinney, Axmouth, and John Oke , of Compyne  gentleman , executors of the last will of Walter Oke, the elder of Pinney, their deceased father on the one part and Samuel Burrow of Charmouth , Blacksmith of the other part and Nicholas Warren of Mincombe in the parish of Sidburu in Devon of the third  part. The said Samuel Burrow  rightfully possessed of all that Teneemnet commonly known as Mans Tenemnt, consisting of a dwelling house, an orchard, 2 fields f meadow and one field of pasture in Charmouth late in the possession of Jmaes Parsons of the same place, yeoman, his tenants and now of Samuel Burrows for the residue of a term of 2000 years from 1575. Did mortgage in 1743 into the said Walter Oke, the elder all that said tenement by payment of £200 and interest . Now due £208 , in the consideration of £104 paid to them by the said Nicholas Warren ..All that one piece of ground formerly enclosed by Edward Mabell deceased containing by estimation 3 acres or therabouts and have for severall years been converted into an orchard lying at Langmoore and adjoining the lands formerly of John Burridge , esq.All that orchard commonly reputed a Burgae of one acre ground formerly in the tenure of one George Coming decease, since of William Comins and late of Clement Joyns. All that messuage, Tenement or Inn called or commonly known by the name of the George Inn with all the curtelage ,orchard, etc. All that messuage or dwelling house formerly called or known by the name of the Rose and Crown and the curtelage, backside, garden and orchard to te same belonging. And all thatdwellong house, garden and orchard hereunto belonging containing by estimation one acre or more thereabouts formerly in the possession of Mary Hodded, Widow afterwards of JohnMinsom, since of Ann Monson, his widow , then of Robert Monson and late of Willliam Walter Minwich. Premises are situate in Charmouth aforesaid and are now in the possession of Samual Burrows
Signed Walter Oke and Sam Burrows. Robert Cheek,Jmaes Trew. Daniel Furfs
Received of mr Ealter Oke the sum of £107 to be paid not me signed by Samuel Burrow.
1753 Conveyance (lease and release). 1 Walter Oke of Pinney, Axmouth, Devon, gent. 2 Francis Folaquier of Taunton, Soms, grocer. 3 Jacob Burrows of Charmouth, blacksmith. 1 and 2 to 3 Property: two closes at Harners Hill and two closes at Langmoor, in Charmouth Consideration: 250D-1344/1/2
1767Two messuages in Charmouth (Oke, Webb) 1767; messuage and garden in Charmouth (Butler, Davey, Ridges) 1792, 1795, 1796.. D-VIZ/26/1
1751 (1) Walter Oke of Lyme Regis, gent, John Oke of Combpine, Devon, gent, executors of their father. Walter Oke of Pinney in Axmouth, Devon, gent. (2) Henry Roper of Whitchurch Canonicorum, tallow chandler and Mary his wife. (3) Mary Loring of Hawkchurch, spinster Whitchurch Canonicorum. Assignment of mortgage on Carters Ley..
This house was built in 1837 by Mr. R .S. Marker. During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the site, which consisted of about 3 acres, enclosed by Edward Mabell, was owned by several people, among whom was Samuel Burrow - a Blacksmith - who purchased it for £64. In 1760 he sold it, with other properties in Charmouth, for £400 to Walter Oke of Axmouth. It passed eventually to Sept Smith who sold it to R .S. Marker, when it was called Farr's Orchard. (Farr was son-in-law of Samuel Burrow).There was a quit rent of 6d payable annually to the Lord of the Manor, and a right of way or passage across the land was claimed by the Rev. Brian Combe, curate in charge of the parish.
The trustees readily secured suitable tenants. At one time it was occupied by Miss Marryat, sister of Capt. Marryat the novelist, who had a girls school; one of her pupils being Ann Besant. She let the house to Mr. James Harrison and his wife in about 1851. Mr Harrison, although suffering from ill health, was a collector of fossils and is famous for his discovery of the earliest British dinosaur, which was named after him by Sir Richard Owen, Scelidosaurus harrisoni. From Fernhill he moved to No. 3 Hillside, Charmouth, where he died in 1864.
A later tenant was Sir Campbell Munro, who built the nursery wing. He was followed by General Eliot, who offered to buy the house for £750.
In 1703 the George Inn was owned by John Burridge of Lyme Regis, who leased it to James Dober, a yeoman, 'late of Stratton and now of Dorchester" . The lease was for one thousand years for which James Dober paid £60 and a rent of 'one peny at the Feast of St.Michael the Archangel, only if the same be lawfully demanded'. He also undertook to pay 2d monthly, the proportion of the poor rate of 16d monthly charged to Burridge`s lands." In 1760 Walter Dice, a gentleman of Axmouth purchased "all that tenement or inn called "The George Inn" for the residue of 1000 years, which commenced 25 March 1703, from Samuel Burrow, with five other pieces of land for £400'.' (Two of these were "Fernhill" and "The Elms") Walter Oke died in 1763. In 1783 Francis Oke was owner when the Manor was sold by Francis Phipps Henvil to James Warden.
1753 the George owned by Samuel Burrow.
All that tenement or inn called the George Inn with all it's curtelage, orchard, etc. Samuel Burrow owns these with others including the Rose and Crown  for securing £320 with Walter and John Oke, sons of Walter Oke, the elder of Pinney, Axmouth. 
By 1760 Walter Oke has purchased all that Inn called The George Inn  for the residue of 1000 years , which commenced 25th March 1703. he had bought 5 other pieces of land from Samuel Burrow for £400 including the Elms and Frenhill. Unfortunately he was not able to enjoy them for long as he died in 1763. His son Francis, was to inherit the properties the rentals for the village in 1783 show him as owner of the George Inn standing on an area of  2 foods, 12 perches. He also owned Langmoor Orchard of just over 2 acres ? 
 
 
 
 
During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the site, which consisted of about 3 acres, enclosed by Edward Mabell, was owned by several people, among whom was Samuel Burrow - a Blacksmith - who purchased it for £64. In 1760 he sold it, with other properties in Charmouth, for £400 to Walter Oke of Axmouth. It passed eventually to Sept Smith who sold it to R .S. Marker, when it was called Farr's Orchard. (Farr was son-in-law of Samuel Burrow).
In 1774 Jacob Burrow dies.His wife continues to live in his house.
1780 Land Tax shows Edward Farr paying £1-3-0. Mrs Newberry owns The 3 Crowns and the adjoining field.
Marriage for John Hunter and Hannah Cavill at Charmouth in 1777. Edward and Elizabeth Farr are witnesses and the ceremony is carried out by the Rector, William Coombes
In 1782 Farr, Mr. And Mrs Burrows - Edward Farr and Elizabeth Burrows - Lands - £ 1-3-0
1783 Key to missing map shows Edward Farr having a long Leasehold for his house and orchard lately belonging to Burrows (£4-0-0d) 0a 3p 15r. He also another property of 1p16r as well as a number of fields at Langmoor.
Then 1 acre, 1 rood 22 perches also situate in Charmouth aforesaid now in Closes at Harners Hill were some years ago purchased in fee by the said Brian Combe deceased of the said Elizabeth Farr , Widow the only child and heiress of the said Jacob Burrows deceased by Elizabeth his wife also deceased
Burrow Elizabeth Burial 28 Sep 1735  
Burrow Elizabeth Baptism 18 Aug 1745 Jacob Burrow,
Burrow Elizabeth Burial 24 Dec 1800  
Burrow Jacob Burial 16 Mar 1774  
Burrow John Burial 3 Apr 1725  
Burrow Samuel Burial 2 Mar 1781
burrows insurance policy


1788
In 1788 Edward Farr is paying 3s.3d Land Tax for the house and land formerly owned by his father in law, Jacob Burrows.
1793
1795
 
1796
1796 Edward Farr - Self- £1-16-6d
 
Conveyance (lease and release). 1 Brian Combe of Charmouth, clerk. 2 Elizabeth Burrow of Charmouth, widow; Elizabeth Barr of Charmouth, widow; 3 John Warren of Lyme Regis, esq.
Description 1 and 2 to 3 Property: 3 closes of land at Langmoor, (6a) in Charmouth Consideration: 370
Date 4, 5 Jul 1798
 
 
 
farrs 1802
In 1802 Elizabeth Farr is paying 4/6d for her house, which formerly belonged to her father, Jacob Burrow.
 
1805
1805 Land Tax - William Edwards - Late Farrs - House - himself - 4s.6d.
 
1807 William Edwards - John Hunter - Late Farrs - House - himself - 4s.6d.
1807 William Edwards - Three Crowns - Joseph Bradbeer - 10s.7d.
1814 William Edwards shown as owning Farrs, described as House and Orchard
1819 William Edwards
1821
1821 Poor Rates still showing William Edwards owning Farrs House and paying 7-0 for it
1822
1822 Poor Rates still showing William Edwards selling to Joseph Wilson, Farrs House and Orchard
1824
1824 Poor Rates show Mrs Woolcott renting a house and Garden, Coach House and Stables, Mrs Cleeve a House and Garden. John Boules rents 2 fields from him.
In 1824 There is a request for new pews in the Church gallery and Mr. Wilson is shown as owner of Lower Cottage which is lwt to Mrs. Cleave and also lets a cottage to the Reverend. G. Crossman known as Middle Cottage.
October 7th1824 at St. Marys, Lambeth, Joseph Wilson, Esq. of Charmouth, Dorset to Mary Ann, youngest daughter of the late John Coles, esq. of Trinity Lane at Bow in London
October 7th1824 at St. Marys, Lambeth, Joseph Wilson, Esq. of Charmouth, Dorset to Mary Ann, Coles, of the parish of St. Georgethe Martyr, Queens Square, Middlesex
1825
1825 Poor Rates
1827 Poor Rates
1831 Poor Rates
 
1828 Baptism of Joseph Wilson in Charmouth. Mary Ann Wilson ( 1792-1849)
1822 three cottages lately in occupation of Philip Weadon and Samuel Osborne and then in sole Tenancy of William Edwards, butchers these premises were there before known as Folletts and Tibbs Tenement, owner Jacob Burrows and afterwards owned by Edward Farr and Elizabeth, his wife. Brian Combe and then of Catherine Williams now called Farrs Tenement.
1824 Joseph Wilson and Mary Ann Coles of East Street, Lion Square
1823 land tax
1823 Land Tax showing Joseph Wilson paying 4/6d for the property known as "Farrs".
1827 Land Tax
1827 Land Tax showing Joseph Wilson paying 4/6d for houses for himself and others.
1831 Electoral Register
1831 Electoral Register showing Joseph Wilson, Gentleman
1841 map
1841 Tithe Map and 1889 Ordnance Survey Map
1841 Tithe Map shows no.3 Hillside (t.no.60) owned and occupied by Joseph Wilson (aged 48).
No. 2 Hillside (t.no. 59) owned by Francis Jeanes and occupied by Mary Cleeve (aged 40).
No.1 Hillside(t.no. 60) owned by Harriet Prior and occupied by John Peterson.
WILSON Joseph WILSON Joseph WILSON House & Garden -
-
1
10
60
WILSON Joseph WILSON John JEFFERY Potatoe Plot Arable
-
1
27
137
WILSON Joseph WILSON John JEFFERY Farr‘s Hill Arable & Cliff
2
1
37
138
WILSON Joseph WILSON Joseph WILSON House & Garden -
-
1
10
60
JANES Francis JANES Mary CLEAVE House & Garden -
-
1
3
59
PRIOR Harriet PRIOR John PETERSON House & Garden -
-
1
3
58

On the Coast of Dorsetshire, between Bridport and Lyme Regis. To be sold by Auction by W. Abbott, about 6 o`clock
in the evening on Tuesday 22nd March, 1842 at the Mail Coach Inn, Charmouth. A Marine Villa, Freehold and redeemed
from Land Tax, with its appropriate Fixtures in perfect order and condition, situated on the London Road, in the delightful
village of Charmouth, built of the best materials and in the most substantial manner from a design by Sir Jeffrey Wyatville,
comprehending ten well-proportioned principal sitting and bed rooms, with an entrance, geometrical staircase, and well
adapted approaches, excellent kitchen and domestic offices, with suitable servant’s apartments, pleasure and kitchen
gardens, coach house, stabling, and courtyard, with a pump of fine water, now in the occupation of Mrs. Cleave, at the very
low rent of £60 a year. Further particulars with Conditions of Sale, may be had at the Auction Mart, London, of Messrs,
Parker, Taylor, and Enore, Solicitors, no. 3 Raymond’s Buildings, Grays Inn, on the Premises, of Joseph Wilson, Esq,
Charmouth and of William Abbott, Auctioneer and Surveyor, Eynesbury, St. Neotts, Huntingdonshire, who will forward them
by post to any person applying by letter for them.

1842 February 18 at Charmouth. Emily Susanna, the youngest daughter of the late John Cleave, Esq., of Crediton.
 
 
 
1841 census
In 1841,Elizabeth Cleave (aged 80) is living with her daughter Emily (aged 40) with Frances Gibson (aged 40) and Maria Smith (aged 20) at No. 2 Hillside
1841 census
In 1841, Joseph Wilson shown as living in no. 1 Hillside.He is aged 48 and his wife Mary is the same age. They hace 2 children Joseph (born in 1828) and mary (born in 1833).
1841 census
In 1841, Henry Middras, aged 71 is living with his wife, Rebecca, aged 56 and their 4 daughters - Maria, Cornelia, Anne and Joanna at no. 3 Hillside.
1851 census

Anna Templer, Widow, (aged 64) is living with her daughters, Catherine (Aged 27), Harriet (aged 24) and son William (aged 23) at no.1 Hillside.
Elizabeth Cleave (aged 99) is living with her daughter Frances Gibson (aged 58) at no.2 Hillside
Henry Norris is living at no.3 Hillside in 1851

 

1861
1861 Census shows Caroline Templer, aged 39 and Harriet Templer, aged 35 living with their aunt, Harriet Pryor, aged 83 at no.1 Hillside.
1861 Census shows
1861Census shows James Harrison, aged 42 living at no.
1871 Census shows Caroline Templer living at no.1
 
1871 Census shows Sarah Poulson at no.2on living at no.2

1871 Census shows Frances Grove living at no. 3

1881 Census shows Sarah Poulson living at no.2
1881 Census shows Harriet Templer living at no.1

1881 Census shows Caroline Readill, Housekeeper at no.3

1891 Census
 

The 1901 Census shows:
no.1 Hillside Harriet Templer, aged 74
no. 2 Hillside shows Marie Cookson, aged 29, engaged in teaching
no.3 Hillside hasHenry Eliot aged 47 living with his wife, Helen, aged 34 with their children Kate and Winthrop. There is a reference to it being a school with 2 boarders living there.

 
 
1911 Census shows Henry John Eliot at no. 3 Hillside. nos. 2 and 3 are uninhabited.
1911 Census shows Thomas Hitchcock behind no.1 Hillside.
58 Edward Archer Vince George Mortimer Building and Land Charmouth Street
59 Robert Case? George Mortimer Garden Charmouth Street
60 Amy Alexandria Lewis George Mortimer House and Garden Charmouth Street
61 Francis Glyde George Mortimer House and Garden Charmouth Street
62 William Mcfill? George Mortimer House and Garden Charmouth Street
63 Uriah Gordge George Mortimer House and Garden Charmouth Street
64 Frederick Bridle George Mortimer House and Garden Charmouth Street
65 John Samuel Larcombe George Mortimer House and Garden Charmouth Street
1895
1888 eorge Mortimer on voters list 106 Richmond Road, Earls court , Clarence Villa
1921 John Henry Eliot Helen Elizabeth - no. 3 Hillside. John Templer Prior abode 9 Old Square Lincolns Inn . Sir Cecil Reeves Harrison - no. 2 Hillside
No. 2 Hillside was owned in 1831 by Benjamin Jeanes, dissenting minister and on his death his widow took possession and in 1842 sold it to George Laurie for £820 purchased by Trust Funds. In 1867 it was put up for public auction and bought by the Misses Poulson for £700. When Sarah Poulson died Margaret Maria became sole owner.
 

The founder of the company, Thomas Harrison, was apprenticed to the Confidential Government Printer in 1738, and was joined in the business by his younger brother James in 1743. The firm is best known for printing "The London Gazette" from 1765 to 1910.

 

When Thomas Richard Harrison entered into partnership with John William Parker in 1839, the company was called Harrison and Co., but this changed to Harrison and Son in 1849 and later Harrison and Sons in 1854. Their main premises were at 45-46 St Martin's Lane, but they also maintained private presses at the Foreign Office and the War Office. Another of their famous publications, "Burke's Peerage", was printed at the old Royal Library building in Pall Mall from 1853 to 1905.

 

The twentieth century saw branches of the business established outside central London in addition to the premises in St Martin's Lane, which they occupied until 1964. Postage stamps were printed first at Hayes, Middlesex, from 1911, and later from 1933 at High Wycombe, where the company is still based. The Hayes branch turned into a paper-coating mill. In 1923 Harrisons acquired the controlling interest in J G Hammond Ltd of Birmingham. The status of the company changed in 1920 to become a private limited liability company and again in 1948 to become a public limited liability company.

 

Two members of the family have been knighted: Sir Cecil Reeves Harrison in 1918 and Sir Guy Harrison in 1951. Both served as masters of the Stationers Company. The Harrison family connection with the company came to an end with Richard Harrison's departure in 1979 when the firm was taken over by Lonrho. It was taken over again by De La Rue International Ltd in 1997.

When Cecil Reeves Harrison (Sir) KBE BSc(Lond) was born on April 26, 1856, in St Pancras, Middlesex, his father, James, was 25 and his mother, Harriett, was 26. He had eight brothers and two sisters. He died on December 11, 1940, in Bournemouth, Hampshire, at the age of 84.
 
 
Miss Harriot Templer outside no. 1 Hillside, Charmouth
 
"Alberry House" with 1,2,3, Hillside in 1890
1841 Tithe Map shows no.1 Hillside (t.no.58) owned and occupied by Joseph Wilson (aged 48). No. 2 Hillside (t.no. 59) owned by Francis Janes and occupied by Mary Cleeve (aged 40). No.3 Hillside(t.no. 60) owned by Harriet Prior and occupied by John Peterson.
 
To be sold by Private Contract, 1818
Two newly - built Cottages, calculated for the residence of small genteel families with a garden and field behind, with one acre, situated in the much admired village of Charmouth, and within a quarter of a mile of the sea.
The houses are so constructed that they may be converted into one, and in the case would form an excellent situation for a Seminary or an Inn.
For Particulars, apply Mr. Templer, Bridport.
N.B. A part of the purchase money may remain on security of the premises, if required

Folletts and Tibbs Tenement now 1,2,3 Hillside

No.2 Deeds

1736 Thomas Rose of Wootton Fitzpaine, Peter Templeman of Dorchester and Jacob Burrows of Charmouth, Blacksmith.

1774 Jacob Burrows, who died in that year to his widow, Elizabeth.

1781 Elizabeth Burrow, Edward Farr, Blacksmith and his wife Elizabeth Farr and Robert Hallett of Axminster, Grocer.

1782 indenture between Edward Farr and Elizabeth his wife, Elizabeth Burrow, Robert Hallett, George Trenchard of Maudlin,Thorncombe,Clotheir, Sanuel Follett of Lyme, Gentleman, Samuel Lock of the same place, Gardener.

1787 Indenture between George Trenchard,Elizabthe Burrow, Edward and Elizabeth Farr, Samuel Forward of Axminster, Gentleman and Samuel Follett, John Newman of Axminster, Gentleman. 

1793 Indenture between Samuel Forward, Elizabeth Burrow, Edward  and Elizabeth Farr, Brian Combe, John Newman and John Warren Esq of Lyme.

1802 Indenture between Elizabeth Farr, John Warren, Brian Combe, Rawlings Mallock of axminster, Gentleman. 

1822 indenture between Catherine William's, niece of Brian Combe, William Joseph Wilson, then living at Lyme and James Templer of Bradpole, Gentleman.

1830 Indenture between Harry Gobins Kesterman of Oakhills, near Taunton, Esq. Joseph Wilson, being a deed of covenant for the production of deeds of partition bearing date 5 1820 made between John Spurway of Milverton, esq and France's, his wife catherine Williams , etc. 

I presume that Joseph Wilson built the 3 houses now known as 1,2,3 Hillside in 1827.

In an indenture of 27th December 1831 between Joseph Wilson, Benjamin Jeanes, dissenting minister,George Morris of 2 York Place, Mile End Road. Bean jim Jeanes buys no.2 it was formerly occupied by the Rev. cross an and in 1831 by Hnery Gage Morris.

The land north of the property was in occupation of James Powell, Butcher. On the east was a messuage or tenement belonging to Joseph Wilson and in the occupation of Mrs. Cleave. On the west by a messuage or tenement belonging to Joseph Wilson and in his occupation and possession. 

The house was described as a newly erected messuage that had a frontage of 42 feet on the Kings highway and a width of 35 feet at the north end from south to north wall was 233 feet. The west wall of the garden had to be kept in repair by Jeanes as owner of no. 2 and the east wall by Wilson as owner of no.1

Benjamin Jeanes bought no.2 for £1150.

In his will, proved June 1841, Benjamin left no.2 to his widow,France's Jeanes and after her decease to his daughters, Elizabeth Bolton, Sarah West and France's Dobbyn Williams. Sarah west did not marry and died intestate in 1839 and was buried in bathwick, Somerset. 

1842 Indenture between France's Jeanes of Lismore Ireland and the other trustees was sold to George Lawrie for £820. 

On 1867 no.2 was put up for Auction and bought by sarah Davies Poulson and Margaret Maria Poulson for £700. On her will Sarah Poulson left all her possessions to her sister in 1887. Subsequently Margaret left no, 2 to Julia and Mary Trenchard. On their deaths to Wilaim Petre on condition that neither embraced the Roman Catholic religion. Among her legacies was £20 whose interest was to keeping in repair the grave of her mother, Elixabeth Poulson. She died in 1890.

Mrs Pulson was the wife of George Poulson, late of Clifton and daughter of David Davies, Surgeon she died in 1853.

No.2 was a girls school owned by Miss Cookson and later Sir Cecil Harrison.  Stayed there and owned the first motor car, a De Dion Bouton in charmouth. He was the son of mr. Harrison who lived at Little Hurst 

At the end of the latest book on Queen Marie Antoinette's necklace by an author. It is stated that the De Roahn family have repaired the debt of honour incurred by Cardinal Louis de Roahn, who was duped by Madame de la Motte- Valois all those years ago. The sate,net was signed by Charles de Roahn , Charmouth. Prince Charles had been living at 2 Hillside for some years(1961) and in the summer months in Austria. Where he had property. (Page 564).

During the 70s and 80s of the last century. No1 was occupied by the two misses tramples,no2 by the two misses Poulsons and no.2 by two misses Wilson. Six maiden ladies living opposite the village Doxtor, then a widower. Each one was quite prepared to be Mrs. Norris. Dr. Norris married four times. 

The reverend E.J. Macklemore moved to no.1 hillside from the old Rectory in 1953

 
No.3 Hillside
5-6 April 1822 indenture of lease and release between Catherine Williams ( niece of Brian Combe, Joseph Wilson,James Templer. Three cottages lately in the occupation of Philip Weadon, Samuel Osborne and then in tenancy of William Edwards, butcher. These premises were there before known as Folletts and Tibbs Tenement ( owner Jacob Burrows) and afterwards owned by Edward Farr and Elixabeth, his wife. Brian Combe and then Catherine Williams and is now called Farrs Tenement. Except a piece of land to be sold to Wiliam Juson containing in length 80feet in breadth 7feet 6 inches leading from the Street to the fields of Juson. ( this is the right of way between Hillside and Backlands Farm. To hold the house unto Joseph Wilson. In this Indenture was a covenant by Wilson to put up a hedge or good boundary fence between the conveyed premises the land sold to William Juson. Shortly afterward Wilson erected a Stone Wall as boundary fence.
5-6 October 1824 between Joseph Wilson and Mary Ann Coles of East Street, Lion Square, Middlesex and William Heddington and Fletcher Wilson
24 October 1839 Between Fletcher Wilson, Joseph Wilson and Mary Ann ( nee Coles) his wife, James Russell
21 May 1857 Between Fletcher Wilson, Joseph Wilson, James Wilson and James George Tatem and George Boughton Hume.
Mary Ann Wilson died 15December 1849. The house was sold to Captain William Mould, occupied by James Harrison on 9th August 1866 by James Wilson of Long Acre, Middlesex, Surgeon and James George Tatem of Reading, Berks. Joseph Wilson of 3 Hereford Road, Westbourne Grove and William Mould, late of Greenwich and now of Charmouth.
23 December 1875. Captain Mould R.N. Of 3 Foulis Terrace, Onslow Square sold the house to Samuel Potter, Solicitor, 36 King Street, Cheapside, London, Gentleman for £750.
A Map shows length of property 336 feet, width of frontage 40feet9 inches. Lawn 48feet by 42 feet. A square house 42 feet with kitchen and rooms over extending at back. A coal cellar, stable and coach house and garden. The width of the garden wall on the north 47feet 6 inches. The owner on West was Andrew Tucker and on the east, Rev. Thomas Naylor. With note that all walls except one on the east side belong to Captain Moulds premises.
James Harrison had formerly lived at Evenhill. He was interested in Geology and excavated a Dinosaurus, now in the Natural History Museum, which bears his name. The Harrison's Scelidosaurus of Charmouth.
1808 - 1810 Samuel Osborne renting Crouts from F. Brad beer 5-8d
Henry Templer had three daughters with Sarah Thomas between 1823 and 1837, but all three were baptised by their mother alone. Henry and Sarah were eventually married in February 1838 just three months before his death. Although christened Thomas, all three daughters took their father’s surname in later years and, in 1881 Sarah and her daughters ran a school in Brighton. Ownership of Downe Hall passed to Henry’s younger brother, James, a solicitor who had moved to Bridport around 1811. He had business interests in both the Pymore Mill Company and the brewers, Gundry, Downe and Co., as well as having a significant property portfolio.Unusually, although he retained ownership until the 1850s, James Templer did not live at Downe Hall, instead he lived at the Grove, which he built in 1830. It is more likely that his daughter, Hebe, was given the use of the Hall after her marriage to John Venn Prior in 1838. Prior was a London barrister and, by 1841, their main residence was in Greenwich, relegating Downe Hall once more to a country retreat. Sadly John Venn Prior died in a riding accident in 1855, around which time James Templer transferred ownership to his daughter. Hebe Prior decided to move from Greenwich to Harrow, where the public school provided free education for the sons of widows, provided they were day pupils. In 1859, Hebe Prior started a school at her house, Roxeth Mead, educating not only her children, but those of the masters of Harrow School.
Burton Bradstock Church. The Rector of the time was James Lethbridge Templer, and his cousin was Edward S. Prior. It is this combination that gave us our "Victorian Church" within the medieval building we know so well. Because the church is so well maintained we still have today the legacy almost intact as it was given to us in 1897. It is one of the best examples of the period, and quite well known. The visual impact is chiefly in the western end of the church, but the fact that the remainder of the fabric looks much as it would have in olden times is also due to this man Edward Prior, for he was an architect and his policy of restoration was one of repair and preserve wherever possible - no demolition unless unavoidable. So this Victorian work of preservation also turns out to be a fine example of the "Arts and Crafts" period, which is what makes it so important.

Into this period was born the architect Edward Schroder Prior.


He was born in 1852, in London, into a wealthy and strictly evangelical household. His father, John Venn Prior, had in 1838 at Bradpole church, married Hebe Templer, the daughter of James Templer, a Bridport solicitor. James Templer at that time owned three houses in Bridport, Mountfield, The Grove, and Downe Hall


When Edward Prior was only 3 years old his father, aged only 43, was killed by a fall from his horse in London, and Mrs Prior was left with eleven children.

p

PORTRAIT OF THOMAS ROSE OF WOOTTON FITZPAINE, DORSET(1679-1747)Half length, wearing a grey coat and long wig, oil on canvas 74.5 x 62cm. The Roses were originally merchants at Lyme Regis.Thomas Rose (1679-1747) was sherrif of Dorset in 1714. He left an only daughter. Mary, who married Francis Drewe, Esq. This estate afterards came to Thomas Rose Drewe. second son of Francis Drewe, who resided in Wootton Fitzpaine until his death in 1815.

During the 1850s, quarry owner James Harrison of Charmouth, West Dorset of England found fossils from the cliffs of Black Ven between Charmouth and Lyme Regis, that were quarried, possibly for raw material for the manufacture of cement. Some of these he gave to the collector and retired general surgeon Henry Norris. In 1858, Norris and Harrison sent some fragmentary limb bones to Professor Richard Owen of the British Museum (Natural History), London (today the Natural History Museum). Among them was a left thighbone, specimen GSM 109560. In 1859, Owen named the genus Scelidosaurus in an entry about palaeontology in the Encyclopaedia Britannica

Scelidosaurus is the best preserved and most complete dinosaur found so far in Britain. It is only found here at Charmouth and nowhere else in the world. It was a heavily armoured plant eating dinosaur, which was related to ankylosaurs and stegosaurs and lived near the ancient shores of what is now 'England'.

Scientists think that a herd of these dinosaurs were washed out to sea and drowned. The Centre has a life size cast of the most complete Scelidosaur found to date and new display all about these amazing dinosaurs.The Charmouth Heritage Coast Centre has well-presented displays of locally discovered fossils, including the eponymous Charmouth dinosaur – Scelidosaurus.

This was the earliest complete dinosaur fossil to be unearthed in England, and is thought to be the best known species of dinosaur that lived here 190 million years ago.

The first fossils of this four-legged plant-eater, about 4m (13ft) long, were uncovered by Charmouth quarry owner James Harrison during the 1850s. They were sent to Professor Richard Owen of the British Museum, who classified it Scelidosaurus harrisonii.Scelidosaurus was found in the Liassic cliffs of Charmouth, Dorset by James Harrison in 1858,

William Force Templer came to live at 1 Hillside on 5th December 1823. Devoted to land and freshwater Mollusca and to marine zoology generally.
Henry, letters to James Harrison of Charmouth , 68 107-108, 116, ... E
LANG WD 1947a: James Harrison of Charmouth, geologist (1819-1864). PDNH and AS 68 for 1946, 103-18.PROCEEDINGS OF THE DORSET NATURAL HISTORY & ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY - FROM JANUARY 1ST TO DECEMBER 13ST, 1946 - VOLUME 68 Hardcover – 1947
1980
 

The earliest record is in 1736, when Thomas Rose of Wootton Fitzpaine sells the property to Jacob Burrows. Thomas Rose is from an extremely wealthy family, originating as merchants in Lyme Regis. He is Lord of the Manor and lives in a fine house in Wootton Fitzpaine. As a contrast, Jacob is a Blacksmith, but he also,purchases a number of properties in the village including The George Inn and Rose and Crown Inn, The Elms and Even Hill. But he sells most of these to William Oke,but keeps his house and some fields. These eventually would be where the three Hillside properties would be built. He marries Elizabeth and they have one child also Elizabeth who goes on to marry Edward Farr, who is also a Blacksmith.  Jacob dies in 1774 and his wife lives with her daughter and son in law. The land taxes which run from 1780 until 1833 are very helpful in finding changes in ownership. It would seem that the property is mortgaged  or partly owned by the wealthy Village Curate, Brian Combe, who also owns the Farm behind their property. A  map of the village  from 1783, which has sadly been lost, but whose record book survives shows the house having almost 2 acres of land. An insurance policy dated 24th June 1792 describes the house as thatched as were most in the village with a Blacksmiths nearby which is tiled. She also has a house nearby which is let to Gordge and is shown to have sold 3 closes of land at Langmor to Brian Combe in 1798. Her son in law Edward dies in 1795 and she dies 5 years later. It would seem from the land tax records that Farrs as it was to be known was bought by wealthy butcher, William Edwards in 1804 on the death of Elizabeth Farr. He lives almost opposite in what is Beech House and also owns the 3 Crowns ( Coach and Horses). Farrs is described in the Land Tax records as a house and orchard paying 3 1/2d. He  lets it as he does with the Inn which is managed by Joseph Bradbeer for many years. There is reference in a deed to it being 3 cottages lately in the occupation of Philip Weadon and Samuel Osborne. But it all changes in 1822 when he sells Farrs to Joseph Wilson. He is to build the 3 attractive Villas that stand on the site today. The 1824 Poor Rates describe them as Houses with gardens, coach house and stables. They are let to Mrs Woolcott, Mr. Crossman and Mrs Cleaves. In the same year there is a request for new pews in the Church and amongst those interested is the Reverend Crossman living in Middle Cottage, Mrs Cleave in Lower Cottage. By 1827 Joseph Wilson is living in his own house, Captain Morris in the middle and Mrs Cleave in lower cottage. I don't know too much about Joseph Wilson, apart from the fact that he marries Mary Ann Coles in 1824 and had a son, Joseph who was baptised in 1828 in Charmouth Church. In 1841 he is shown as owning and living at no. 1. When no. 2 is auctioned by him with Mrs. Cleave as tenant it is descibed as being designed by Sir Jeffrey Wyatville.
1841 Tithe Map shows No.3 Hillside(t.no. 60) owned by Harriet Prior and occupied by John Peterson.

 
The 1851 Census shows Anna Templer, Widow, (aged 64) is living with her daughters, Catherine (Aged 27), Harriet (aged 24) and son William (aged 27) at no.1 Hillside.
The 1861 Census shows Caroline Templer, aged 39 and Harriet Templer, aged 35 living with their aunt, Harriet Pryor, aged 83 at no.1 Hillside.
1881 Census shows Harriet Templer, aged 45, living at no.1 Hillside. there was no record for 1891, as it was remarked that the occupant had left on a visit on the night of the Census.
The 1901 Census shows Hillside Harriet Templer, now aged 74 living at no.1.
She died in 1903. Since then the property has been owned and occupied by the Prior and Templer families. The last to live there was Miss L.K. Prior, who sold it to Canon and Mrs. Whittington, and on the death of the Canon it was purchased by "the Ecclesiastical Commissioners in 1953 and was then Charmouth Rectory.
1901 Voters List
1915 Voters List

Hillside

Folletts & Tibbs Tenements now 1,2,3 Hillside 

No. 2 Hillside Deeds

Indentures

29-30 September 1736 between Thomas Rose of Wootton Fitzpaine, Peter  Templeman of Dorchester and Jacob Burrows of Charmouth, Blacksmith

7th April 1774. Letter of Administration of the effects of Jacob Burrows, now spelt Burrow to Elizabeth .. Widow.

18th April 1781. Indenture of Demise between Elizabeth Burrows, Edward Farr, Bkacksmith and his wife Elixabeth Farr ( Sole Child of Jacob and Elizabeth Burrow & Robert Hallett of Axminster, Grocer.  

28.29th April 1782 Indenture of Lease & Release between Edward Farr & Elizabeth, his wife, Elizabeth Burrows, Robert Hallett, George Tenchard of Maudlin, Thorncombe, Clothier & Samuel Follett of Lyme, Gentleman, Samuel Lock of Lyme, Gardener. 

Easter Term 1784 Indenture of Fine Wherein Samuel Lock, Plaintiff and Edward and Elizabeth Farr and Elizabeth Burrow were Deforciaciants  ( Deforce is to keep out of possession by force) 

18-19 July 1787. Indenture of Lease and Release between George Trenchard, Elizabeth Burrow, Edward and Elizabeth Farr, Samuel Forward of Acminster, Gentleman, Samuel Follett, John Newman of Axminster,  gentleman.

24- 25 May 1793 Indenture of Lease and. Release between Samuel Forward, Elizabeth Burrow, Edward and Elizabeth Farr,  Brian Combe, John Newman and John Warren, Esq. of Lyme

12- 13 August 1802 Indenture of Lease and release between Elizabeth Farr, John Warren, Brian Combe and. Rawlings Mallock of Axminster, Gentleman.

5-6 April 1822 Indenture of Lease and Release between Catherine Williams( niece of. Brian Combe), Joseph Wilson, then living at Lyme and James. Temples of. Brad pole, Gentleman.

22 December 1830 Indenture between Harry Gobins Kesterman of Oakhills, near Taunton, Esquire, Joseph Wilson - being a deed of Covenant for the production of Deeds of Partition, bearing date 5-6 1820 made between John Spurway of Milverton Esq, Francis, his wife ( late Frances Purlewent) , Catherine Williams ( late Catherine Purlewent) Jane Purlenwet, Mary Purlewent, Frances Catherine Warren, William Purlewent and John Warren. 

These Indentures are referred to in an Indenture of 27December 1830

I presume that Joseph Wilson built the Three Houses now known as 1,2,3 Hillside in 1827 .

An Indenture of 27th Decemnver 1831 between Joseph Wilson, Benjamin Jeames, dissenting minister, George Morris of 2  York Place, Mile End Road. Benjamin Jeanes being no.2. It was formerly occupied by the Rev. Crossman and in 1831 by Henry Gage Morris.

The Land north of the property was in occupation of James Powell, Butcher. On the east was in a Messuage or Tenement belonging to Joseph Wilson and in the occupation of Mrs. Cleave. On the west was a Messuage or tenement belonging to Joseph Wilson and in his occupation and possession. 

The house was described as a newly erected Messuage and had a frontage of 42 feet on the Kings Highway and a width of 35 feet at the North End. from South to the. North Wall was 233 feet.

The west wall of the garden had to be kept in repair by Jeanes as owner of no.2 and the east wall by Wilson as owner of no.1

Benjamin Jeanes bought no. 2 for £1,150 

In his Will proved June 1841, Benjamin left no.2 to his Widow, Frances Jeanes and after her decease to his daughter, Frances Jeanes and after her decease to his daughters Elizabeth Bolton, Sarah West and Francis Dobbyn Williams.

 Sarah West did not marry and died intestate in  October 1839 and is buried in. Bath wick, Somerset.

No. 2 was sold to George Laurie for £820 in 1842

In an indenture 24th June 1867 between Robert Lewin of Cheam, Surrey, Estate Agent, Samuel Robert Lock of Regents Park,Artist and the Rev. Thomas Nayler,  Cheyne Walk, Chelse and Sarah Davies Poulson and Margaret Poulson of. Charmouth.

No.2 was put up for public auction in 29th May 1867 and was bought by the misses Poulson for £700

In her will Sarah Poulson left all her possessions to her sister Margaret Mria, which was proved November 22nd 1887

Margaret Maria Poulson died 23rd June 1890.

No. 2 Hillside was a Girls School early in the 20th Century owned by Miss Cookson.and later Sir Cecil Harrison stayed there and owned the first Motor Car in Charmouth - A De Dion Bouton. Sir Cecil was the son of Mr. Harrison who lived at Little Hurst  

 

No 1 Hillside

The earliest record is in 1736, when Thomas Rose of Wootton Fitzpaine sells the property to Jacob Burrows. Thomas Rose is from an extremely wealthy family, originating as merchants in Lyme Regis. He is Lord of the Manor and lives in a fine house in Wootton Fitzpaine. As a contrast, Jacob is a Blacksmith, but he also,purchases a number of properties in the village including The George Inn and Rose and Crown Inn, The Elms and Even Hill. But he sells most of these to William Oke,but keeps his house and some fields. These eventually would be where the three Hillside properties would be built. He marries Elizabeth and they have one child also Elizabeth who goes on to marry Edward Farr, who is also a Blacksmith.  Jacob dies in 1774 and his wife lives with her daughter and son in law. The land taxes which run from 1780 until 1833 are very helpful in finding changes in ownership. It would seem that the property is mortgaged  or partly owned by the wealthy Village Curate, Brian Combe, who also owns the Farm behind their property. A  map of the village  from 1783, which has sadly been lost, but whose record book survives shows the house having almost 2 acres of land. An insurance policy dated 24th June 1792 describes the house as thatched as were most in the village with a Blacksmiths nearby which is tiled. She also has a house nea which is let to Gordge. She is shown to have sold 3 closes of land at Langmor to Brian Combe in 1798. Her son in law Edward dies in 1795 and she dies 5 years later.it would seem from the land tax records that Farrs as it was to be known is bought by wealthy butcher, William Edwards in 1804 on the death of Elizabeth Farr. He lives almost opposite in what is Beech House and also owns the 3 Crowns ( Coach and Horses). Farrs is described in the Land Tax records as a house and orchard paying 3 1/2d. He  lets it as he does with the Inn which is managed by Joseph Bradbeer for many years. There is regency in a deed to it being 3 cottages lately in the occupation of Philip Weadon and Samuel Osborne. But it all changes in 1822 when he sells Farrs to Joseph Wilson. He is to build the 3 attractive Villas that stand on the site today. The 1824 Poor Rates describe them as Houses with gardens, coach house and stables. They ate let to Mrs Woolxott, Mr. Crossman and Mrs Cleaves. In the same year there is a request for new pews in the Church and amongst those interested is the reverend Crossman living in Middle Cottage, Mrs Cleave in Lower Cottage. By 1827 Joseph Wilson is living in his own house, Captain Morris in the middle and Mrs Cleave in lower cottage. I don't know too much about Joseph Wilson, apart from the fact that he marries Mary Ann Coles in 1824 and had a son, Joseph who was baptised in 1828 in Charmouth Church. 

William Edwards church warden 1749, 1763, 1789
Thomas Edwards 1787  1795
1822 three cottages lately in occupation of Philip Weadon and Samuel Osborne and then in sole Tenancy of William Edwards, butchers these premises were there before known as Folletts and Tibbs Tenement, owner Jacob Burrows and afterwards owned by Edward Farr and Elizabeth, his wife. Brian Combe and then of Catherine Williams now called Farrs Tenement.
1824 Joseph Wilson and Mary Ann Coles of East Street, Lion Square
Follett 1791 BENJAMIN FOLLETT, OF LIME REGIS DORSET, GENT
Gibbs 1791 ELIZABETH GIBBS, PENN, CHARMOUTH, DORSET
FOLLETT Thomas Public Record Office Will 1732
1853
30th October 1851
29 january 1853
Captain Mould enterted navy in 1828, lieutenant 1842, commander 1855 and retired capatin in 1866

Mabel will 1697
In the name of God Amen, the eleventh day of October, 1697. I Edward Mabell of Charmouth in the County of Dorset, Soap Boiler, being of sound and perfect memory and understanding and minded to settle and disgorge such Estate in God Almighty  hath blessed and with all revoking and making void all former wills by me, do make this my last Will and testament in manner following.
I give to Thomazine, my now wife, All those several Tenements called Folletts and Tibbs Tenements, Yondover and the Hill Close called Hearns Hill and my house called Carters House for her widowhood and the remainder of my estate in Folletts and Tibbs Tenements and the Hill close called Hearns Hill I give and devise to my son John. From my Will and pleasure is that after the widowhood of my fair wife my son Edward and his assigns shall hold and enjoy all those three picks of ground called Yondovers and the house called Carters  House and a house called Mill Shuttle House and their appurtenances for and during the remainder of my term wherein. My son John Mabell shall have and enjoy all the main profits and annual income from all my estate called Newlands, both the higher and lower part during his natural life and on his decease my son, Edward Mabell shall have all the profits and income from Newlands. On the decease of my two sons, my grandson, Joseph Bragge, junior shall have the estate.if my son in law, Joseph Bragge, Clerke Rector of Charmouth, paying £150 to Joseph Bragge. Give to John my utensils and implements of my trade and to my daughter, Joanne five shilling, daughter Rose, twenty shillings. Appoint my two sons and three sons in laws to be overseers of this my last Will. 

Wimborne, Allendale House On Hanham Road; according to the plaque, built in 1823 by Sir Jeffry Wyatville for the Castleman family; now the headquarters of East Dorset Heritage Trust.
 
 
 
George Harrison Esquire, Clarenceux King of Arms of the South
East and West parts of England from the River Trent
Southwards send greeting.
WHEREAS
THOMAS TEMPLER of SALMON POOL in the
parish of ALPHINGTON in the county of DEVON, Gentleman,
eldest son and heir of THOMAS TEMPLER also of SALMON
POOL of ST JAMES’S ABBEY EXETER, deceased, hath
represented unto the most noble CHARLES DUKE of
NORFOLK, EARL MARSHALL and HEREDITARY
MARSHALL of ENGLAND, that being desirous of bearing
Armorial Ensigns with due authority he therefore requested the
favour of His Grace’s warrant for devising, granting and
exemplifying such as may be proper to be borne by him and his
descendants and also by his brothers and sisters, viz. The
Reverend JOHN TEMPLER of COLHAMPTON in the County of
DEVON Clerk, HENRY TEMPLER Esquire late a Commander
in the service of the East India Company, JAMES TEMPLER of BRIDPORT in the County of
DORSET, Solicitor, The Reverend CHARLES TEMPLER of HONITON in the County of
DEVON, Clerk, WILLIAM AUGUSTUS TEMPLER of the INNER TEMPLE LONDON, Solicitor,
and such arms by his sisters BARBARA wife of WILLIAM FORCE of HONITON, Gentleman,
ANNE, wife of DENNIS O'KELLY, a Major in the Army, and MARY TEMPLER, spinster,
and by their descendents respectively according to the laws of arms. And forasmuch as the
said Earl Marshall did by warrant under his hand and seal bearing date the 2nd.day of
August instant authorise and direct us to devise, grant and exemplefy such Armorial Ensigns,
accordingly
KNOW YE THEREFORE THAT WE THE SAID GARTER and CLARENCEUX in
pursuance of his Grace's warrant and by virtue of the letters patent of our several offices to
each of us respectively granted, have devised and by these presents grant and exemplefy unto
the said THOMAS TEMPLER the arms following, that is to say,
Azure, an antique Temple Argent, on a Chief Or an Anchor erect between two Bulls
Heads erased at the neck sable, and for the crest on a wreath of the colours, a Lamb Passant
Argent under a Coffee Tree proper as the same are in the margin hereof more plainly depicted,
to be borne and used for ever hereafter by him the said THOMAS TEMPLER and his
descendants and also by his brothers and sisters' the said JOHN TEMPLER, HENRY
TEMPLER, JAMES TEMPLER, CHARLES TEMPLER, WILLIAM HENRY AUGUSTUS
TEMPLER, BARBARA FORCE, ANNE O'KELLY and MARY TEMPLER and by their
descendants respectively, according to the laws of arms.
In witness whereof, we the said GARTER and CLARENCEUX KINGS of ARMS have to these
presents subscribed our names and affixed the seals of our several offices this fifth day of
August in the fifty fifth year of the reign of our SOVEREIGN LORD GEORGE the THIRD, by
the Grace of GOD, of the UNITED KINGDOM of GREAT BRITAIN and IRELAND, KING,
DEFENDER of the FAITH etc, and in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and
fifteen.
(sd)
ISAAC HEARD GEORGE HARRISON
Principal Garter King of Arms Clarenceux King of Arms
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Anna Maria Templer`s Will for 1857 where she leaves no.1 Hillside to her daughters.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
In 1826 The Reverend Thomas Nayler is shown as marrying in Dora Nayler at St. Georges. He lived at no. 2 Hillside in 1866. In 1844 he owned Newlands Farm. In 1867 on list of voters.
 
Sir Jeffrey Wyatville (1766-1840)
 
Richard Piers Whittington is the brother of the Whittington sisters who lived at Tne Limes (Charmouth Lodge) for many years
Benjamin Jeanes Will proved in 1841.

This Indenture made the 9th August 1866 between James Wilson late of Cecil Street, Strand now of Long Acre in the County of Middlesex.Surgeon and James George Tatum of Reading in the county of Berkshire , Esquire of the first part and William Mould, late of Greenwich of the County of Kent, now of Charmouth in the County of Dorset, Captain in the Royal Navy of the third part . Whereas by certain indentures of lease and release bearing date respectively of the fifth and sixth day of April 1822 the latter made between Catherine Williams, widow of the first part and the said Joseph Wilson of the second part and James Templer, Gentleman of the third part for the valuable consideration of the said indenture mentioned the said Catherine Williams conveyed and assigned unto the said Joseph Wilson his heirs and assigns all those three Cottages or dwelling houses with the outhouses, garden, orchard and their appurtenances there to belonging containing together about one acre(more or less) situate lying and being in it about the centre of the village if Charmouth then lately in the several occupation of Philip Wheadon  and Samuel Osborne as tenants the tog and then in the sole tenancy and occupation of William Edwards, Butcher. All of which said premises were theretofore called or known by the name or names of Folletts Tibbes Tenement and were formerly in the tenure and possession of Jacob Burrows of Charmouth, fore said, Blacksmith, afterwards of Edward Farr and Elizabeth his wife, the only child and heiress of the said Jacob Burrows and Elizabeth, his wife, late of the  Reverend Brian Combe of Charmouth aforesaid, Clerk and then of the said Catherine Williams and had of late years been distinguished by the name of Farrs Tenement except the certain piece or parcel of land part of the said premises contracted to be sold by the said Catherine Williams to William Juson of Charmouth aforesaid, Gentleman, containing in length about eighty feet and breadth about seven feet six inches leading from and out of the common highway in Charmouth aforesaid to the close or field of the said William Juson to hold the said dwelling house, heridiaments  and premises except as aforesaid unto the said Joseph Wilson, his heirs and assigns for ever and in the said Indenture was contained a said covenant by the said Joseph Wilson to put up a hedge or other good and sufficient boundary fence between the Pte,uses thereby conveyed to the said Joseph Wilson and the said piece of ground so sold to the said William Juson. Whereas shortly after the date of the said recited indenture the said Joseph Wilson erected a stone wall as good and sufficient boundary fence between the premises purchased by him aforesaid. And whereas indentures bearin the date fifth and sixth of October 1824 the settlement made between the said Joseph Wilson of the first part, Mary Coles, then of East Street, Red Lion Square in the county of Middlesex, Spinster of the second part and William Headington and Fletcher Wilson, there's respectively described as the third part ( being the settlement made on the marriage therein intended and shortly afterwards solemnised betwen the said Joseph Wilson and Mary Ann Coles, the said Heridiaments and premises therein conveyed and assigned unto the said Willam Headington and Fletcher Wilson and the survivor of them to be signified.

An indenture dated 21st May 1857 betwen the said Fletcher Wilson of the first part , the said Joseph Wilson and Mary Ann, his wife of the second part and James Russell of the third part and a certain indenture bearing the date 22st May 1857 Benetton the said George Bougton Hime of the one part and the said James Wilson and James Grotge Tatem of the other part in the place of the said William Headington and Fletcher Wilson. And whereas the said Mary Ann Wilson departed this life on 15th December in 1849, and whereas the said James Wilson and Jamss George Tatem have at the request and by the direction of the said Joseph Wilson unto the said William Mould for the sale to him of the heridiaments and premises hereinafter described and intended to be herby conveyed for the price of £850. They convey to William Mould his heirs and assigns All that cottage or dwelling house with the outhouses, garden and other appurtenances belonging containing one third of an acre, be the same more or less, late in the occupation of James Harrison, as great of the said Joseph Wilson and now of William Mould, which said premises situated in Or about the centre of the village of Charmouth aforesaid and are more particularly described in the map or plan drawn in the margin.

Below are the several Indentures herein recited to. 

5/6 April 1822

5/6 October 1824     

24/25 October 1839

21 May 1857 

Plan shows Mr. Andrew Tucker living in Albury House (Cottage) and Reverend Thomas Naylord at no. 2 Hillside.  



1846