Langmoor Manor
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Langmoor Manor c.1870
The 1810 Ordnance Survey for Charmouth showing Langmoor to the north west of the village and open fields to the south of the Street.
Sir Richard Spencer (1779- 1839)
Lady Ann Spencer (1793-1855)
Ann Liddon Spencer as a young girl at Langmoor Moor
The Manor of Charmouth with it's Manorial Rights , and the Estates of Langmoor and Seaside Lands with 120 acres was auctioned on 27th of September, 1837 at the Coach and Horses in Charmouth. But it could not have met its reserve as the sale did not go through until 1854.
1789
1792
In 1797 John Dicken is shown as renting Langmoor from Elizabeth, widow of James Warden In 1830, James, eldest son of Anne Liddon was lost at sea on the ship John.

In 1853 the Manor of Charmouth and Langmoor Manor were auctioned in London and bought by George Frean from Plymouth. The Memorial to Captain Matthew Liddon in Charmouth Church
The place names of Dorset by A.D. Mills has the above references for Langmoor. It would seem that the earlist reference is in 1251(Forde Cartulary)where it is referred to as Langmoreshegh. Another reference by Hutchins in his history of Dorset has it as Langesmores geth. The name derives from "long moor or marshy ground". Several springs are marked nearby.
Grant also that every burgess may keep a draught animal in the common pasture, namely from the road adjoining the moor of Geoffrey Heron (Heyrun) extending west to the land of Stephen Pain (Payn) and along the bounds of Stephen's land as far as the ditch on the land formerly of Robert Russell (Rosel) and from this ditch up to Langmoresgeth 
1754 Poor Rates list show Jacob Burrow for Langmoor and Samuel Burrows for his own house burgage and Langmoor.
Mr Benjamin Bradford complained of as being underrated in respect of a tenement and lands which he purchased about the year 1752 being part of lands which belonged to John Burridge Esq. and stood in his name in the church rates in the year 1750 and before (to wit) John Burridge Esq. for the Fountain 1s 6d ditto for Lushes 4d in all 1s 10d at the time of Mr Bradfords purchase it was agreed the rates should be divided for Lushes and part of the Fountain Lands 10d .The Fountain to remain 6d and Barrow for the other part of the without any variation. In the year 1754 the Poor Rates were thus Benjamin Bradford for Lushes, which includes part of the Fontain Lands 10d, Jacob Burrow for Langmoor part of the Fountain Lands 6d Goring for the Fountain 6d. which makes the sum of 1s10d

Langmoor stands well back and is hidden by trees and flowering shrubs. it is first mentioned in 1320 as Langesmeresgeth in the Cartulary of Forde Abbey, where it mentions the boundaries of the village defined by the Abbot, who owned the Manor, given to the Abbey by the Beauchamps.
In 1783 the manor of Charmouth was purchased from Francis Phipps Henvill by Lieutenat James warden R.N., and instead of living in the Manor House in the village, he went to live at Langmoor.
James Warden was in 19 engagements against the french fleet and was a gentleman of uncertain temper. He quarrelled with his son, whom he disinherited, and in his will left the Estate to his wife and upon her decease, upon trust, out of the rents and profits they were to pay to his son, William Weeks Wharton, £20 a year during his life by 4 evenly quarterly payments. But in case he should at any time sell, dispose of, or make away with or borrow money upon the said annuity. thendeclared the bequest therof should be deemed void.The trust money was derived from Charmouth House property and other houses. At several Vestry Meetings he objected to certain rates. In 1789 he won an action against the Rev. Brian Combe and others for removing sand and seaweed from the beach, and finally he quarrelled with his neighbour, Norman Bond, to whom he was extremely abusive in charmouth Street and threatened to shoot his dogs. Bond told him that he was unaccustomed to abusive language and would not contend with him in that way. Warden answered he was ready to meet him in any way whatever and walked off. During the next few days Warden refused to apologise and fresh insults followed. which led to the fatal catastrophe which afterwards happened. the parties met on the morning of 28th April, 1792 at Hunters Lodge. The first shot fell to Warden, Bond having given the challenge, and the ball passed through Bond`s hat. Bond was a better marksman; immeditaely on his firing Warden being shot through the heart, was killed. The inquest was held at Axminster, but Bond was not immeidately arrested and escaped to Barbados and later returned. His age and when he died are not known.It is recorded on his tomb in the chuirchyard that Mrs. Warden, after lingering upwards of 6 yeasr, died on 11th June 1798, wasting with pining sickness, it might be supposed that she died broken hearted. However there is a letter froma Mr John palmer to Mr Mellor, attorney-at-law, in which he says that Mrs warden welcomed and even courted her widowhood. She chose the pistopls, thanked the gentleman who had lent him them and made no effort to prevent the duel, although she lived close to a magistrate. In short she seemed determined that one of thjem should fall. If Mr. Bond. that her husband must be hanged, and if the latter, she was fairly rid of him.
On the death of Mrs Warden the property passed to her daughter, who married captain Matthew Liddon, R.N. They appear to have been badly off, as the properrty was mortgaged to raise money for the educationof the children, and the house was occupied by Mrs. Austin. The last Liddon to live there was Matthew, who died in 1864, when the Manor was sold to John Hawkshaw, the famous Engineer, who sold it to John J. Coulton in 1871, neither of whom appear to have lived there.
later owner was James Moley, " the hansomest man in Dorset", black-haired, tall and strong. Who had been educated with Dr. Liddon at Robert`s school in Lyme. He was a great collector of ferns and would walk miles after fresh specimens baut towards the end of his life he became a recluse and never was seen outside the grounds. his bread was left by Coles outside the gates which were kept padlocked. The greenhouses were in a ruinous condition when he died in 1910 and ferns were growing up through the floor of the drawing room. He left £400 to Lyme Regis as he considered that Charmouth had not appreciated him. Langmore Gardens in Lyme were laid out with the proceeds.

A remark made by Reginald Pavey concerning the subsequent ownership by James Warden`s daughter has baffled me for ages. In his notes he refers to her being in debt and having to mortgage the Manor to pay for his children's education. Without any evidence I thought it best just to mention it in passing. But I was delighted to find buried in the Dorset Record Office a magnificent bundle of deeds that covered the Liddon`s ownership and revealed the tangled web of debt she and her family were to amass on the security of the Manor of Charmouth for over 50 years. It was not where I had expected to find them, but in later owners Abstract of Title, which had been copied in depth by his solicitor. It is a fascinating record of how the family held on to the Manor and used it to settle School fees, Marriage Settlements and upkeep with only having to sell off properties occasionally. Villages were annually paying their rents unaware as to whom their payments were going to. Initially Ann Liddon (nee`Warden) on the early death of her husband Matthew in 1804 had borrowed £600 from Samuel Newberry, a wealthy gentleman shown as living ay Bovey House in Beer. She later had to borrow a further £555 from C.Flood and S. Miles, which the document shows, was needed to “ better educate and support her children in a suitable manner”.

The year 1812 was to prove an expensive year for Anne when she had to find the settlement for the marriage of her daughter Ann Warden Liddon to Richard Spencer. She was to sell some of her Charmouth properties and take out another loan. This time the Rev. Charles Forward of Axmister was to assist her in meeting her debts. By 1821 her creditors wanted payment, as she had not paid any interest on the loan. She was fortunate to borrow £1500 from Sarah Northcote using the security of Charmouth Manor to pay off the other creditors and merge her debts. Sarah was to die in 1838 and leave everything to her brother George Barons Northcote. When Ann died in 1849 her surviving children are shown as Mathew Liddon, Jnr, of Harwich, Essex, a Lieutenant in the Royal Navy, Sophia Jackson Liddon and Lucy Liddon. In her will she leaves each of them a part of the Manor of Charmouth. Thomas Russell, an Attorney in Beaminster is now shown as the main creditor after paying off the other parties. Her daughter Ann had by now become Lady Spencer and resided in King Georges Sound, Albany in Western Australia.

In 1783 A Map was made of the village. which has been lost but a record book has survived and below is a record of Langmoor at that time.
56.Langmoor, James Cousins, Thomas`s Plot (£1-1-1d) 1a 1r 1p
57.Langmoor, James Cousins, Little Mead ( £1-1-7d) 1a 0r 1p
58.Langmoor, James Cousins, Batch (£1-14-11d) 3a 0r 0p
59.Langmoor, James Cousins, Batch Meadow (£1-5-4d) 1a 1r 0p
60.Langmoor, James Cousins, Lower Close (£2-15-9d) 2a 3r 0p
61.Langmoor, James Cousins, Langmoor Coppice (£0-10-10d) 1a 1 r 0p
62.Langmoor, James Cousins, Rhodehorn (£0-16-5d) 0a 3r 26p
63.Langmoor, James Cousins, Rodehorn Cliff (£0-9-0d) 4a 2r 2p
64.Langmoor, James Cousins, Burrows Plot(£0-14-9d) 0a 2r 23p
65.Langmoor, James Cousins, Double Common (£3-0-2d) 2a 0r 1p
66.Langmoor, James Cousins, Single Common (£1-11-7d) 1a 0r 6p
67.Langmoor, James Cousins, Single Common ( £1-12-4d) 1a 0p 18r
68.Langmoor, James Cousins, William Channan House & Grounds (£3) 0a 3p 26r
69.Langmoor, James Cousins, Edwards Close (£2-12-10d) 1a 2p 9r
70.Langmoor, James Cousins, Westleys & Bragges Common (£3-0-6d) 2a 0p 2r
71.Langmoor, James Cousins, house & Orchard Goring (£3-10-0d) 0a 3p15r
72.Langmoor, James Cousins, Single Common Goring (£1-10-6d) 1 a 0p 3 r

196. Edward Farr, Late Burrows, Lower Langmoor Mead
197. Edward Farr, Late Burrows,Higher Langmoor Mead
198. Edward Farr, Late Burrows,Langmoor Coppice
199.Edward Farr, Late Burrows, Langmoor little Coppice
200.Edward Farr, Late Burrows, Coppice Close
201. Edward Farr, Late Burrows,two pieces on Rhodehorn

 

1796 John Dickens Esq for Langmoor and Thomas`s Plot
1803 Mrs Newton for Langmoor 12/9d and 3s2d for Thomasss Plot.

1845 Samuel Warren Puddicombe, Esq. Langmoor,

Tenant
Owner
Description
A
R
P
T.No.
115
LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Lawn
Meadow
4
1
27
115
116
LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Orchard
Orchard
-
2
6
116
117
LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
House, Yard & Garden
-
1
-
14
117
118
LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Thomas Plot
Meadow
1
-
10
118
119
LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Little Mead
Meadow
1
-
15
119
120
LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Batch Mead
Meadow
1
2
39
120
121
LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Favis
Pasture
3
2
37
121
122
LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Batch
Pasture
3
2
8
122
123
COZENS
James COZENS
Sarah LIDDON
Langmoor Plot
Pasture
1
-
20
123
124
COZENS
James COZENS
Bennett FELLOWS
Three Acres
Meadow
2
3
4
124
125
COZENS
James COZENS
Bennett FELLOWS
Rough Field
Pasture
2
-
19
125
126
HODGES
John HODGES
Trustees of MARKERS Charity
Farr’s Orchard
Meadow
2
1
27
126
127
GRAVES
Robert GRAVES
Robert GRAVES
Plantation
Plantation
1
1
9
127
128
COZENS
James COZENS
Trustees of INDEPENDENT CHAPEL
Langmoor Coppice
Pasture
1
-
33
128
129
LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Little Coppice
Wood
-
3
-
129
130
COZENS
James COZENS
Sarah LIDDON
Long Strap
Arable
1
3
-
130
131
LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Braggs Coppice
Wood
2
-
8
131
132
LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Langmoor Coppice
Wood
2
1
9
132
133
LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Sarah LIDDON
Langmoor Coppice
Wood
1
3
26
133
1841 Tithe Map shows that Ann (Sarah) Liddon as owner of Langmoor House and estate, although the Census shows her living at Melborne House on the Street in Charmouth with her daughters Sophoia and Lucy.

56

Sale of Langmoor Manor in 1910 by Lyme Regis Council to William Forward

James Moly, who bequeathed the paintings to RAMM in 1910, was born c.1826 in Hawkchurch, Dorset. He was a draper and druggist in Hawkchurch, taking over a drapery and grocery business that had been run by his parents. By 1881 he had retired from the business and was living on “income from real and personal property” according to the occupational detail of the census of that year. His address was given as Longmoor (near the Axminster Road) Charmouth. By 1901 the address was Longmoor House. The inscription on the paintings gives the address as Ringmoor Manor. The details indicate that the writer knew something of the family history and wanted it recorded. There are records of the Moly or Moley family in Hawkchurch back to the 1780s.

By the time that a special R.H.S. Exhibition of British Ferns was held in London in August 1892 more of the pioneers had died. The Schedule for the latter described "Special Medal Prizes offered by British Fern Growers to Amateurs of the United Kingdom for specimens of the best varieties of British species, with the object of creating a greater interest in our native Ferns".

There were sixteen classes for collections and other prizes for best individual specimens. The prizes for the first four of the classes were given in memory of South West Pteridologists and the fifth also came from the South West. These five were as follows:

Class A - Colonel A.M. Jones's Memorial Prize for 10 plumose varieties (no restriction of species). Given by his daughters and Captain Stafford Jones. Silver Gilt Flora Medal. [Colonel Jones of Clifton, Bristol had died in 1889]

Class B - Mr Edwin Fydell Fox's Memorial Prize for 10 cruciate or narrow varieties (no restriction of species). Given by his sons, Dr E. Churchill Fox, and his brother, Mr G.F. Fox. Silver Gilt Flora Medal. [Mr Fox of Brislington, near Bristol had died in 1891].

Class C - Mrs Maria Grant's Memorial Prize for 10 varieties of Athyrium filix-femina. Given by her son, Mr W.J.A. Grant. Silver Gilt Flora Medal. [Mrs Grant of Hillersdon House, Devon had died in 1891].

Class D - Mr William Charles Carbonell's Memorial Prize for 10 varieties of Polystichum aculeatum and hybrids with P. aculeatum. Given by "the Family". Silver Gilt Flora Medal. [Mr Carbonell of Usk, Monmouthshire had died c.1889].

Class E - 16 varieties (no restriction of species). Given by the Clifton Zoological Gardens, Mr E. J. Lowe F.R.S., and Major Cowburn F.R.H.S. First Prize, Silver Gilt Flora Medal. [A major part of the Jones and Fox Collections had been given for display at Clifton Zoological Gardens. Major Cowburn died before the show took place].

Among the prizes for best individual specimens, Mr James Moly of Charmouth, Dorset gave a Bronze Flora Medal for the Best specimen of a variegated or golden variety. Edward Lowe won these and most of the other classes (Lowe, 1895) but most of the 'competition' had 'passed on'.

 
Lease. 1 John Hassard the elder of Lyme Regis, merchant. 2 Nicholas Dawe of Lyme Regis, yeoman.
Recites that the property was leased to 1 in 1575 by John Petre [Peters] of Writtle, Essex, esq for a term of 2000 years 1 to 2 Consideration: 360 Rent: 1s pa Term: 99 years Property: Coome Moore (24 a) and Coome Moore Meede, bounded by land of John Wadham of Catherston, esq called Hogseter and Brodland to the north, and land of John Peters [Petre] called Parke, to the east and Netherbarres and Grange to the south. Also bounded by land called Newers Close and Lange Moores to the west.1 Oct 1620 (D1265 2/1)