Devonedge, formerly Sunnyside, The Street, Charmouth
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II am slowly working down "The Street" from Barrs Lane, dealing with the group of three adjoining properties that were lost to the village in 1894 and their replacements. The last issue covered the property known as "Streets" or the Arcade as it is now. This article will provide the reader with a history of the adjoining property which is now called "Devonedge" and previously "Sunnyside" which was built on the site of the previous building. Fortunately, there are photographs and plans that allow us to visualise how it looked. It was Georgian fronted with four windows and a central door at street level with five windows on the first floor. Its history would have gone back to 1290 when it would have been one of the burgages with their half acre plots stretching back to the North stone wall that still survives. As with many Charmouth dwellings the owners and occupiers are separate. In this case the earliest record I have is of Richard Gollop who left it in his Will of 1725 to his niece Mary Hansford and was it known by her name “Hansfords” in the Poor Rates and Land Tax Lists that followed.  It was to remain in her family and her descendants until 1856, but they always rented it, choosing to live in Burton Bradstock.  For most of this time it was used as the Rectory, before the present building was erected in 1827. It was rented by the Reverend William Coombe from 1747 until 1783 and then his son Rev. Brian until his death in 1818 on 30 year leases.   
Returning to Richard Gollop, who may well be an ancestor of the famous Lyme Regis, historian, Ken Gollop, whose family also originate from Charmouth. The Gollops were a very wealthy aristocratic family whose extensive history appears in Hutchins History of Dorset. Richard was one of 12 children born to Thomas and Elizabeth Gollop of Strode in Netherbury. I do not know too much about him apart from the fact that he also owned “Mill View” for which he paid £68 in 1718 from George Comings. His wife was Grace Colmer from another wealthy local family, who may well have been associated with Colmers Hill in Symondsbury. His Will has survived and part of it relates to his house where Devonedge is today as follows: “I give unto my cousin Elizabeth Hansford, daughter of my said brother George Gollop from and after the decease of my said wife all that my dwelling house and backside with all and singular the appurtenances in Charmouth aforesaid to hold to her heirs and assigns for ever”. I am sure that it was Richard who built the fine house that previously stood there as Elizabeth Hansford and her descendants owned other properties and only rented their Charmouth house and would have no need to rebuild it. She was the daughter of George Gollop of Berwick in Burton Bradstock who was married to Mary Squibb and had 10 children. They had several eminent offspring, including George who was sheriff for Dorset in 1745 and his brother, James, sheriff in 1768. Another brother, Thomas was Captain of Portland Castle. The family lived in Berwick House - a fine ancient Mansion near Burton Bradstock.
Elizabeth Gollop married Richard Hansford in 1722, but both were to die young, he in 1733 aged just 35 and she in 1726 aged 26. They had just the one daughter Mary who was to go on to lead a full life until her death in 1803, aged 77. She married twice and had seven children altogether. Her first marriage was to Benjamin Adney in 1749 and they had three children - Mary (1752-1800), George (1750-1803) and Benjamin (1750-). He died in 1759, when she was just 33 years with three young children. Benjamin’s Will includes the following: " I give and bequeath all that my dwelling house with its Outhouses, Garden, Orchard and a road or way through Samuel Burrows Orchard with The Appurtenances situated at Charmouth in the said County of Dorset now in the possession of the Reverend Mr. William Combe unto Mary Adney, my wife during the Term of her natural Life without impeachment and from and after her decease. I give and bequeath the said dwelling house with its appurtenances unto my son George Adney". A rich widow, just four years later she married Lieutenant William Hansford and they are shown to live at The Rookery in Burton Bradstock. Both her eldest son, George, and daughter, Mary predecease her and her house in Charmouth is inherited by her son in law, Richard Symes. An abstract of her will is as follows: all that my messuage or dwelling house with the garden, orchard and appurtenances thereto belonging situate and being in Charmouth in the county of Dorset and now in the occupation of the Revd. Brian Combe subject to the payment such principal money and interest as may be due on the mortgage, thereof at the time of my decease to her daughter, Mary and husband Richard Symes. The family continued to live in Burton Bradstock and receive the rent from "Hansfords” in Charmouth. When Richard dies in 1812, it is his son Captain Benjamin Adney Symes who is to inherit his father’s extensive estate. In 1828, aged 48 he marries Mary Daniel in Burton Bradstock. The Poor Rates for Charmouth show him renting out the house until his death in 1844, where after his wife, Mary is shown as the owner. His will is as follows: I Benjamin Adney Symes of Burton Bradstock in the county of Dorset, Gentleman, a Captain in the 2nd Regiment of Somersetshire Militia 1844 give to my dear wife Mary Symes  Symes all my Estate situated in Stoke St. Gregory in Somerset now in the occupation of James House also all that dwelling house, orchard, garden and premises thereto belonging situated in the Parish of Charmouth in the occupation of John Coles. The records are incomplete for a while, but it would seem that by 1855, the house had been sold to the tenant - John Coles and would remain with this family for almost a century.
We are fortunate with regard to locating properties in the 18th century as a Map reference book has survived and is very informative as it describes William Hansford having a house and orchard worth £4-10-0d, measuring 2 roods 13 perches in 1783. The more accurate Tithe Map of 1841 shows this as tithe no. 47, then owned by Benjamin Adney Symes who was renting it to John Coles.
I now wish to deal with the Tenants of the property where "Devonedge" is today from 1725 on the death of Richard Gollop. His wife Grace was to live for a further 7 years after her husband’s death and was buried at St. Andrews Church in Charmouth. The earliest Poor Rates for Charmouth are dated 1752 and Benjamin Adney is listed as paying a 1d. his tenant at that time was Rev. William Coombe, who took on the post of Rector of Charmouth five years before. The house he rents from the Adneys is one of the finest in Charmouth. Judging from the surviving photos of it before its loss in a fire. For many years it was to serve as The Rectory for the Coombes. William purchased a 30-year lease from 1756, shortly after his marriage to Sarah, daughter of James Syndercombe of Symondsbury. This was renewed in 1786 by his son and a copy of this can be seen in the Record Office at Dorchester for which they were paying £17 a year.
From 1747 until 1818 the Churches in Charmouth and Catherston were to be run by William and then his son, Brian Combe. There are no graves or memorials to them, yet their names appear regularly as witnesses and trustees on many deeds and documents relating to the village. A memorial to the family can be seen at the Parish Church at Shepton Mallet where they originated from as Clothiers. They were related to both the famous families of Wyndham and Strode who fought in the Civil War. There is also a family connection to both the Purlewant and Schalch families.
Reverend William Combe became Rector in Charmouth in 1747 under the Patronage of Richard Henvill, nephew of Anthony Ellesdon. His later obituary is very detailed and reveals what a charitable and capable man he was. It goes on to say that it is expected that his son Brian will be filling his role. But although he was Rector of neighbouring Catherston, he never became Rector, instead he held the position of Curate for the rest of his life. This was because the Patron in 1783 was Francis Phipps Henvill, living in St. Kitts who chose his kinsman, Rev. Audain to take on the position. This gentleman was rarely there and his work was carried out instead by his deputy Brian Combe.
Brian was left a large fortune by his father and bought a number of properties both in Charmouth and the neighbourhood. He would also assist villagers by giving them mortgages for their houses. He purchased Backlands Farm, to the north of The Street from James Warden who had bought most of the village in 1788. Brian never married and when he died in 1818 left his considerable estate to his nieces: Frances Purlement, Jane Purlement, Catherine Williams and Frances Warren. He lived with his mother, Catherine and Aunt, Mary Coffin at “Hansfords” until his death in 1818. Brian left £200 a year to his aunt - Mary Coffin from his estate until her death in 1822. Her own Will was very generous to her servants, Rachel and Edward Woonton, who continued to rent the house after she died. Edward appears in the List of Voters for the village for many years as a Gardener. Their slate slab memorial at St. Andrews Church is inscribed as follows: In memory of EDWARD WOONTON/of this parish who departed/this life the 25* day of June/1840 aged 64 years/Also of RACHEL Relict of the above who departed/this life the 30* day of Oct 1841 aged 68 years. In that year, John Coles takes on the lease and moves from the adjoining property, then known as “Streets”, where his family had been Bakers from 1807. The Census for 1841 shows him aged 30 living with his wife, Elizabeth, aged 32 and two young children. Their business flourishes and they have more children. He appears on the Voters List as a Baker and in 1856 his qualification changes to property owner, which must have been the year he purchased the freehold from the Symes family. By 1861 he is aged 50 and describes himself as Baker and Confectioner. He had 5 children living with him – the youngest -  Francis takes on the business from his father when he dies in 1879 aged 66.  In the year 1891 he is aged 45 and marries Lilian Dare of Bowshot Farm in Wootton Fitzpaine, aged 28 in the parish Church in Charmouth. Village Historian, Reginald Pavey wrote that: “Coles was a member of the church Choir and Churchwarden for many years. His wife and her sister looked after the shop, and he drove his van delivering. When the shop was destroyed by fire in 1894, Coles at once began to build another to take its place. The result was "Sunnyside" afterwards named "Devon Edge”. Gollop and Hann, who were the masons employed, encountered great difficulties when it came to building the west wall which adjoined Pryer`s property. Unfortunately, the Pryer`s were not on speaking terms and Pryer refused to allow scaffolding on his side. They had to lean over and plaster each row of bricks from their side during the building operations. Mrs Coles opened their new house as a lodging house with two or three sets of rooms. At first probably this was attractive to visitors, but unfortunately it was too large for the village and Mrs. Coles found that it did not pay. Coles died in February 1925”.
The 1927 Kelly`s Directory has Frank W. Gamble as proprietor of Sunnyside at that time a Private Hotel. He is also shown as a Baker. The next directory for 1935 has George Grant as owner. By 1939 it under James Fripp, who is the gentleman who renamed it “Devonedge”. Soon after the War, Harris of Lyme bought the premises and turned it into flats. The old cake shop disappeared and a Gift Shop/Post Office and Butchers replaced it.
In 1972 A Cider Lorry careered out of control down the Main Street, just missing a group of children on the pavement and then shearing off the rear of a bus and crashing into a parked van. Fortunately, the only casualty was William Beasley who was cut about the head and arms whilst the bus towered above him outside the Devon Edge Gift Shop. The van which belonged to Morgan's, the newsagents was a write off.
Today Devon Edge, Hairdressers and C & D E Pattimore, the Butchers run their businesses in what would once have been Coles Bakery and Confectioners.
I

Mr. Richard Gollop was buried on September 28th 1725 at St.Andrews Church, Charmouth

Abstract of Richard Gollop of Charmouth`s Will leaving his wife his house in Charmouth and then to his cousin Elizabeth Hansford and her heirs.

Richard Gollop of Charmouth Gentleman give to my wife Grace Gollop the interest and benefits of all my lands , estates, etc. I charge my lands at Hogbear and Bitlake on Symondsbury and Netherbury with £10 to poor. My cousin Richard Gollop, son of my brother George Gollop after his decease unto William Gollop, son of my cousin Thomas Gollop of Marsh. After his decease give the same lands to Ralph Gollop, the other son of Thomas Gollop . Then give to Richard Gollop one other of the sons of my cousin Thomas Gollop.
Item, I give unto my cousin Elizabeth Hansford, daughter of my said brother George Gollop from and after the decease of my said wife all that my dwelling house and backside with all and singular the appurtenances in Charmouth aforesaid to hold to her heirs and assigns for ever. 

Ricard was married to Grace Colmer who died in 1732

The farm was leased to tenants from about 1600 and the Holman and Squibb families held it as such. The Napier (sometimes recorded as Napper) family who held large amounts of land at Swyre, Bexington and Puncknowle, also had an interest at Berwick. John and Robert Napier are mentioned between 1602 and 1641. Some time around 1687 it was inherited by Mary the wife of George Gollop, esq., and daughter of Julius Squibb.The Gollop family were of the same of Strode in the parish of Netherbury. George and Mary Gollop had several eminent children, viz. George who was Sheriff of Dorset 1745; Thomas (1694-1761) who was Captain of Portland Castle and James, Sheriff of Dorset 1768.

Mill View:

On 24th December 1716, George Cumminge failed to pay interest and on 24th November 1718 he sold the messuage for £68 to Richard Gollop of Charmouth, gentleman.

He was Coroner of the County Dorset, and served the oflBce of Sheriff in the
twenty-seventh of Charles II., when he was attended by his ten sons as
javelin men, headed by their uncle. The deficiency in the usual number
i^eing remarked by the Judge, the explanation of the persons who composed
the train was given, and an excuse made upon the plea of so large a family.
He married Elizabeth, daughter and heiress of Thomas Thome, of
Candlemarsh, Gent, and had issue:

1. Thomas, who died s. p. in 1727.

2. Giles, of London, whose line terminated with his grandson, George
Gollop, of Chilfroom, surgeon.

3. William, of Candlemarsh, who inherited his mother's estate, and
was father of

Thomas Gollop, Esq. , of Candlemarsh, ancestor of the GoUops of
that place and of Strete, County Somerset

4. John, continuator of the family.

5. James, of Bristol, in trade.

6. Henry, of Exeter, in trade.

7. Ralph, of Lillington, who died s.p.

8. Benjamin, of Bristol.

9. George, of Ber>\dck, who married Mary, daughter and heiress of
Julius Squib, Esq., and, dying in 1729, left issue:

1. George, Sheriff of Dorset, eighteenth of George II., who died
s.p. in 1753.

2. Thomas, governor of Portland Castle, who manied a daughter
of Edmund Tucker, Esq., of We3rmouth, and died s.p. in 1761.

3. James, Sheriff of Dorset, eighth of George III.

4. Julian, who died in the East Indies, and left issue: Dorothy,
Mary, Elizabeth, who married William Hansford, Esq. , Comm.
R. N. Martha married John Tucker, Esq., M. P. for Wey-
mouth. Sarah married Richard Tucker.

10. Nicholas, of London.

11. Richard, of Charmouth.
1762 Marriage of Lieutenant William Hansford to Mary Adney (Widow) at Burton Bradstock. James Gollop is one of the witneses.
1775 mariage of Richard Symes to Mary Adney at Burton Bradstock.
 
Charmouth, Lease for 30 years 1. William Hansford of Burton Bradstock, gentleman, Mary, wife. 2. Rev. Brian Combe of Charmouth. House and garden rent 17. Witnesses: James Symes, Catherine Champ. 1786

I Mary Hansford of Burton Bradstock. I give to my brother in law, the Rev. john Adury of Uplothan in the county of Devon, clark and John Symes of Bridport in Dorset all that my messuage or dwelling house with the garden, orchard and appurtenances thereto belonging situate and being in Charmouth in the county of Dorset and now in the occupation of the Revd. Brian Combe subject to the payment such principal money and interest as may be due on the mortgage, thereof at the time of my decease 

- Mary Hansford Will of 1803 leaving Charmouth property to her daughter, Mary and husband Richard Symes.
 
Benjamin Adney appears in 1754 Poor Rates List.
1759 will

In the name of God Amen. I Benjamin Adney of Bridport in the County of Dorset, Gentleman revoking and making void all former Wills by me made and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner following (that is to say) first I give and bequeath all that my dwelling house with its Outhouses, Garden, Orchard and a road or way through Samuel Burrows Orchard with The Appurtenances situated at Charmourh in the said County of Dorset now in the possession of the Reverend Mr. William Combe unto Mary Adney, my wife during the Term of her natural Life without impeachment of  Wast and from and after her decease. I give and bequeath the said dwelling house with it's appurtenances unto my son George Adney 

18 Dec 1775 SYMES Richard bachelor Bridport ADNEY Mary spinster o.t.p.   Richd ROBERTS, Ann SYMES

1778 28Sep Adney B - 'Brimley' estate to let Stoke Abbot 1778 20Jul Adney Benjamin - sale of estates at Allington and Bradpole
Assignment and letter of attorney. 1) Benjamin Adney of Pymore, Loaders, esquire 2) John Adney of Uplowman, Devon, clerk and Richard Adney of London, merchant, sons of 1). Bonds, principal and interest.. Mentioned: Mary Hansford, late Adney, widow, John Best, James Gollop, Benjamin Stoodley, Thomas Smith, Francis Symes, Joseph and Elizabeth Palmer, Witnesses: John Twynihoe and Edward Marshall.
1745 Benjamin Adney appointed sherrif of Dorset
Lieutenant William Hansford and his wife Mary Adney (nee Hansford) had only 4 children together (see below), one of them, the only boy, dying in infancy. The family bible shows this, as does William's will. (William's will is a very long document which he seems to have kept revising, in a rather obsessive way, to ensure that his 3 daughters got equal shares that they would be happy with when he died, and so that they and their mother would not quarrel. It gives a rather touching insight into his love for his daughters, and possibly suggests some acrimony on the part of his wife).

This is what I have on William and Mary - rather a long account, but it may be of help to someone:

WILLIAM HANSFORD was born 1719 in Loders or Uploders, the second son of John Hansford and his wife Grace (nee Gillingham). William did not go into the family blacksmithing business, like his elder brother, Emanuel Hansford (1716-1773), and younger brother Joseph (born Feb 1720/21), but made a good career for himself in the Royal Navy. He left the Navy and married just before his mother died in 1763.

He married MARY ADNEY (nee HANSFORD) on 30 Mar 1762 in Burton Bradstock. Mary was the daughter of RICHARD HANSFORD and ELIZABETH GOLLOP. She was born in 1726, and died 26 Apr 1803. (I don't know much about her father, Richard Hansford's, line - I think it is probably your line, Stephen, and I probably got help on this from you originally - any more help with sorting out the earlier line would be very gratefully received!). I do know that Mary's mother, Elizabeth Gollop, was one of (at least) 8 children of George Gollop and Mary (nee Squibb) of Berwick House, near Burton Bradstock. The Gollops were quite wealthy landowners locally).

William was buried in 1799 in Burton Bradstock, as 'Captain (RN) William Hansford' - but some family documents refer to him as 'Commander' (the rank between lieutenant and captain). He is listed as a Lieutenant in the Royal Navy in the Universal British Directory, 1791, with the year of his first commission given as 1757 - William was then 37/38. However, 'The Commissioned Sea Officers of the Royal Navy 1660-1815' gives the date of his commission as Lieutenant as 6 January 1760. There is no mention in the 1791 directory of any higher rank, and it is unlikely that he was still active in the Navy at this date - he would have been in his seventies. 'The Commissioned Sea Officers of the Royal Navy 1660-1815' states that he was advanced to the rank of Superannuated Commander on 23 September 1796 (presumably on his retirement, or at some point after his retirement).
The following details of his career are taken from 'Farmers, Fishermen and Flax Spinners: The Story of the People of Burton Bradstock' by Elizabeth Buckler Gale: 'William Hansford joined his first Royal Navy ship, 'Eleanor' as an Able Seaman in 1739. His naval career took him through the war of 'Jenkin's Ear', later as a Quarter Master sailing in the West Indies. In 1753 he was Master's Mate on HMS Berwick, somewhat appropriately [William married Mary Adney née Hansford, descendant of the Gollops of Berwick House, Swyre] and on HMS Captain from 1753-1756, a ship aboard which Nelson also served. From 1790-1794 he was still to be found as a Lieutenant in the lists of Flag Officers. He died in June of 1799, aged 82.'

William lived with his wife and family in Burton Bradstock most probably in a house called The Rookery. He also owned cottages nearby, which he bought as inheritance for his 3 daughters. The Rookery is still there, quite near Burton Bradstock church, and there is a handsome marble memorial to William in the church.

His wife, MARY HANSFORD, died about 4 years after William. She was 77, and was buried on 06 Jun 1803 in Burton Bradstock.

When Mary had married her first husband, Benjamin Adney in Askerswell on 21 Aug 1749, she was a resident of Swyre. Benjamin died 10 years after their marriage, in 1759, leaving her with 3 children to bring up - George, Mary and Benjamin. I imagine that she was left fairly well provided for - Benjamin Adney was described in the Askerswell marriage register, and in his will, as a 'gentleman'. He left property in Charmouth to her in his will, for the whole of her life, and after her death it was to go to their eldest son George. By the time Mary died she had accrued enough property to be able to leave in her will a tenement and estate in Netherbury; her tenement and estate called 'New Berwick' in Swyre; and the 'messuage and dwelling house'' in Charmouth (which was mortgaged to a cleric) - had her son George, who should have got the property, under the terms of his father's will, died by this time; or had he reached some financial agreement with his mother?

William and Mary Hansford had the following 4 children:

1. ELIZABETH HANSFORD, b. 03 Nov 1763, in Burton Bradstock; d. May 1847. She was baptised 13 Nov 1763, Burton Bradstock. She was buried on 02 May 1847, Burton Bradstock, aged 83. She did not marry, or move far away from her native village - her will (proved 22 Jul 1847) describes her as 'spinster of Burton Bradstock'.



2. ROBERT HANSFORD, b. 12 Feb 1765, Burton Bradstock, "at a quarter past eight at night" (Family Bible); d. 24 May 1765, Burton Bradstock, "at 10 o'clock at night" (Family Bible). Baptised: 14 Feb 1765, Burton Bradstock



3. ANN HANSFORD (Robert's twin), b. 12 Feb 1765, Burton Bradstock, "Ann his [Robert's] sister was borne about six minutes after him" (Family Bible). She died on 20 Dec 1848. Ann married PETER DANIELL of Yeovil, Somerset, on 14 Apr 1798 in Burton Bradstock. They had the following 3 sons:

i. WILLIAM HANSFORD DANIELL, b. 1800; d. 1824, Italy, aged 23, on travels in S. Europe; escribed in burial register as 'of University of Cambridge and of Middle Temple'. Degree: BA Cambridge University (Family Bible)

ii. HENRY PETER DANIELL, b. 15 May 1802; d. 23 Jun 1859. He married MARY JANE KELLY 03 Jun 1845, daughter of WILLIAM KELLY. She died 10 Aug 1862. Henry and Mary Jane had the following children: HENRIETTA MARY DANIELL, b. 16 May 1846; WILLIAM HENRY MARWOOD DANIELL, b. 22 Jun 1849: . LAURA CAROLINE DANIELL, b. 30 Jul 1851.

iii. EDWARD HANSFORD DANIELL, b. Aug 1804. He married MARY PHILLIPS May 1831, and they had the following children: ANNIE FRANCES DANIELL, b. 24 Jan 1834; d. 29 Oct 1874; ISABELLA SOPHIA PYE DANIELL, b. 06 Jun 1835; LUCY DANIELL, b. 1837; d. 1837; CATHERINE DOUGLAS DANIELL, b. 22 Apr 1838; HENRY HANSFORD DANIELL, b. 04 Feb 1841; d. 06 May 1880; CHARLES JAMES DANIELL, b. 21 Feb 1846.

4. CHARLOTTE HANSFORD, b. 16 Dec 1770, Burton Bradstock "a quarter past twelve o'clock in the morning" (Family Bible); baptised: 16 Dec 1770, Burton Bradstock. Charlotte married ROBERT HUNTER, 26 Oct 1790, Burton Bradstock. She would have met her future husband, Robert Hunter, when he was curate of Swyre - she would have been about 16. Rev. Robert Hunter is described in the Burton Bradstock marriage register in 1790 as 'Robert Hunter junior, of St Stephen, London". He was a curate in Swyre before and after his marriage - he was first mentioned in Swyre registers in 1780, and he continued to officiate at baptisms and burials until about 1812, and although he was
17 Nov 1828 SYMES Benjamin Adney bachelor o.t.p. DANIEL Mary spinster o.t.p. Lic. Maria COX, Mary Ann FORSEY, RH ROBERTS

The High Sheriff of Dorset is an ancient High Sheriff title which has been in existence for over one thousand years.[1] Until 1567 the Sheriff of Somerset was also the Sheriff of Dorset.

On 1 April 1974, under the provisions of the Local Government Act 1972, the title of Sheriff of Dorset was retitled High Sheriff of Dorset.[2]

The position was once a powerful position responsible for collecting taxes and enforcing law and order in Dorset. In modern times the high sheriff has become a ceremonial role, presiding over public ceremonies.1746 Benjamin Adney of Loders

Richard Gollop 1726 died
Benjamin Adney was born in 1723 in Loders, Dorset, the son of Benj. He married Mary (Adney) Hansford on 21 August 1749 in Askerswell, Dorset. They had three children during their marriage. He died in March 1759 in Burton Bradstock, Dorset, at the age of 36, and was buried in Bridport, Dorset.

Mary Hansford will 1803

I mary Hansford of Burton Bradstock gives to Rev. John Adney and John Symes of Bridport all that message in Charmouth in the occupation of Rev. Brian Coombs 

Bryan Coombe in his will left £200 a year to his aunt - Mary Coffin from his estate. She died in 1822.
William Coombe died in 1783
1820 Poor Rates showing Miss Mary Coffin renting a house from the executors of her nephew, Rev. Bryan Coombes.
1731 Askerwell - John Coffin of Minehead Somerset gent & Catherine Syndercombe married 17-Jan by licence.
1734 Askewell - Thomas Blake of Minehead Somerset gent & Sarah Syndercombe married 20-Jan by licence.
1738 Gregory Syndercombe clerk & Edith Hawkins of Symondsbury at Litton married 03-Jan
Minehead baptisms - 1733 Katherine to John Coffin of Minehead. 1734 John to John and Catherine. 1735 Mary to John and Catherine Coffin.
Catherine Coombe died in 1812 and buried at Netherbury. William Coombe 1782, Catherine Coombe 1812 Brian Coombe 1817.
John SYMES & Mary HANSFORD married 1-Sep 1751 Powerstock
Memorial to William and Mary Hansford in Burton Bradstock Church.
93.Freehold & Long Leaseholds, William Hansford`s House & Orchard (£4-10-0d) 0a 2p 13r 1780 Map reference book.
Miss Mary Coffin died in 1822 and was buried at Netherbury in that year.
Edward and Rachel Woonton are seen as renting the house from The Trustees in 1823.
1830 Land Tax shows Edward Woonton renting "Edwards" from Warren & Co. who were the joint trustees of Rev. Brian Coombes Estate.
1832 Poor Rates show Edward Woonton renting his house from Warren & Co. (Trustees to Rev. Brian Coombe).
Poor Rates for 1855 showing John Coles qualification as House Duty, all the years before it was Poor Rates

Benjamin Adney Symes of Burton Bradstock, Captain in the 2nd Regiment of Somersetshire Militia died in 1844 left to his wife Mary Symes Symes all his estate in Stoke St. Gregory Somerset. All that dwelling house orchard, garden and premises ghettos belonging situated in Charmouth in the occupation of John Coles 
In 1828 married Mary Daniel in Burton Bradstock in 1775 his parents Richard Symes and Mary Adney married  

Benjamin Adney Symes dies in 1844 in Burton Bradstock. He is a Captain in the 2nd. Regiment of Somerset Militia. He leaves to his wife Mary Symes Symes all his Estate at Stoke St. Gregory also all that premises in Charmouth in the occupation of John Coles and his dwelling house with the cottages in Burton Bradstock unto his wife 

mary Symes 1864 netherbury
1847 Land Tax shows John Coles renting from Mrs. Symes.
Displaced Upright, Rectangular Slate Slab. Top inscribed with admonitions.
In memory of EDWARD WOONTON/of this parish who departed/this life the 25* day of June/1840 aged 64 years/Also of RACHEL Relict of the above who departed/this life the 30* day of Oct 1841 aged 68 years/"If we believe that Jesus died and/rose again, even so them also/that sleep in Jesus will God/bring with him". Thess. Chap.4 v 14. v
A photograph c.1890 looking down the Street. The white building with the two blinds is the site of Devonedge.
The same view with a close up of the building that would be Devonedge.
A photograph c.1890 looking down the Street. The white building with the iron railings is the site of Devonedge.
A view c.1890 shoing the group of buildings before the fire
A sketch of the three buildings that were lost in the fire in 1894, Today they would be The Arcade, Devon Edge and Lansdowne House.
July 12th 1895 Bridport News.
On Sunday afternoon, about three o'clock, smoke was observed issuing from the thatched roof of an uninhabited house belonging to Mr. Pryer, builder. An alarm was at once raised, but the fire had got such a firm hold of the roof that it was found impossible to save it. Efforts were directed to save the adjoining house of Mr. Coles, baker, which was also thatched, but in spite of the exertions of a ready band of helpers, the fire obtained the mastery of the house. A considerable quantity of Mr. Coles furniture and stock was saved and stored in the School Room, which fortunately available, as the school holidays are now on. An uninhabited house, adjoin Mr. Coles, next caught fire, and there was great fear that an adjacent block of thatched cottages would be involved in the conflagration. By pulling down the walls of the house next Mr. Coles the progress of the flames was checked, but the three houses were completely burnt out. Mr. Prayers house and that of Mr. Coles were insured, but we are sorry to say, wholly inadequate to cover the loss incurred by the fire. The third house belonging to Major General Hales was uninsured. Much sympathy is felt for the suffered, and especially for Mr. Coles, whose business will receive a considerable check thro the disaster. Mr Pryer had unify gone to London the proceeding day, and was from home when the property was destroyed. The original of the fire is unknown. 
An aerial view of 1928 showing the group of buildings and the garden where the arcade of shops would be built in 1934.
Sunnyside in 1900, with the neighbouring site on the corner of Barrs Lane a vacant plot, which it was to remain until 1931.
A close up of Sunyside in 1900
An Advert dated 1857 from the "Beauties of Lyme Regis & Charmouth" showing the Goods that John Coles could offer

an extract from Reginald Paveys Notes on Devon Edge:
"In 1843 the Rev. J.D. Hales purchased this property from William Burnard and later in the nineteenth century a pleasant baker's shop with thatched roof, bake-house and sheds stood on this site, with an orchard behind extending as far as "Charmouth Meadows' (now The Playing Field). It was owned, by Frank Coles, who married Lilian Dare of Wootton Fitzpaine in 1891. Coles was a member of the church Choir and Churchwarden for many years. His wife and her sister looked after the shop, and he drove his van delivering . Then the shop was destroyed by fire in 1894, Coles at once began to build another to take its place. The result was "Sunnyside" afterwards named "Devon Edge" . Gollop and Hann, who were the masons employcd, encountered great difficulties when it came to building the west wall which adjoined Pryer`s property. Unfortunately the Pryer`s were not on speaking terms and Pryer refused to allow scaffolding on his side. Hann told me that they were forced to do out and had to lean over and plaster each row of bricks from their side during the building operations Coles placed under a brick a sovereign, a halfsovereign and a five shilling piece to commemorate the event. That night someone, who witnessed this, returned unobserved and removed the coins carefully replacing the brick. For many years after the house was finished he owned up.
Mrs Coles opened their new house as a lodging house with two or three sets of rooms. At first probably this was attractive to visitors, but unfortunately it was too large for the village and Mrs. Coles found that it did not pay. Coles died in February 1925.Several bakers followed including Dike and Gamble. Nash opened the shop as a post office, when Holly gave up at 'Wistaria' , during the 1939�45 war, after which Harris of Lyme bought the premises and turned it into flats, calling it 'Devon Edge" . The old cake shop had been a gift shop for some years, and is now a Butchers and Hair Dressers.
Before the 1894 fire, which destroyed it, "Lansdowne" was a shoe shop, kept by Felstone. (Mrs. Felstone was Fred Penny's aunt). The site was purchased from Coles by Stapleforth of Lyme who built the garage while occupying at the same time the Coach and Horses Stables. The house had to be built some few feet from the pavement, otherwise it would have obstructed a north window in the adjacent cottage. This window has recently been filled in. Woollard followed Stapleforth supposing the garage to be the only one in the village".

The Refrence Book for 1783 shows that 93.Freehold & Long Leaseholds, William Hansford`s House & Orchard (£4-10-0d) 0a 2p 13r. The 1841 Map has the area as 2p 22 r, almsot the same.
1780 shows William Hansford in the Poor Rates In 1781 refrred to as Bragges.
1786 Charmouth, Lease for 30 years 1. William Hansford of Burton Bradstock, gentleman, Mary, wife. 2. Rev. Brian Combe of Charmouth. House and garden rent 17. Witnesses: James Symes, Catherine Champ.
1788 Land Tax shows that Catherine Coombe, wife of William Coombe was occupying Hansfords and Mables. I would assume that her unmarried son, Brian and sister Mary Coffin alos lived with her.
 
 
.

I catherine Combe of Charmouth in 1804 give to my son Reverend Brian Combe of Charmouth, Clerk and my cousin The Rev. Gregory Syndrercombe of Symondsbury the sum of £2000 in trust to pay unto my daughter, Jane Purlewent, wife of William Purlewent of Shelton Mallett, Somerset, Clothier during her life. Mentions daughter of her late daughter,Frances Warren.

Bequeathe to my son Brian Combe her moiety and half part with my sister Mary Coffin all those freehold property in Stogurseyand st. Gregory? In Somerset in tenure of John Gibbs and Mathew Potter and other properties. Witnesses- Elizabeth Richard Mary Richard and Mary Coffin. Proved 1814 

1817 Poor Rates show Brian Coombe renting Hansfords being rented by Brian Coombe to Mrs. Coles.
And all that messuage or dwelling house with the outhouses and other appurtenances to the same.. Situate lying and being in Charmouth in the occupation of Mary Coffin (Aunt)as tenant belonged to the Rev. William Combe, clerk, deceased father of the said Brian Combe, She died in 1818
 
1824 Poor Rates renting to Mrs Coles a House, Garden, Orchard and Stable as well as the field in Lower Sea Lane. Hansfords is sold by executors of Brian Coombe in 1824. The tenant at the time is Edward Woonton.
1825 Poor Rates showing Captain Symes renting House to J. Watts and also Pear Close to William Burnard. The house is refereed to as Hansfords in Land Tax
 
1826 Land Tax showing Captain Spencer renting House known as Hansfords to William Watts, who was to marry Lydia Bradbeer. Below is Mrs. Coles renting the adjoining house whdere the arcade of shops is now from Capatin Spencer.
1848 Land Tax shows Mrs. Symes renting house to John Coles.

1841 Tithe Map showing various lots associated with the Adney/Symes

Tithe no. 47 Bejamin Adney Symes renting to John Coles. The area is 2 roods 22 perches
Tithe no. 44 Rev. John Hales renting Orchard to Joseph Hodges. The area is 3 roods 19 perches
Tithe no. 46 Rev. John Hales renting to Sarah Felstone. The area is 1 roods 4 perches
Tithe no. 176 Rev. John Hales renting Double Common to Joseph Cozens. The area is 2 acres
Tithe no. 204 Rev. William Burnard is renting a Carpenters Shop to John Carter. The area is 4 perches
Tithe no. 205 Rev. John Hales renting a garden to John Carter. The area is 17 perches
Tithe no. 206 Rev. John Hales renting a field called Pear Close to John Coles. The area is 1 acre 2 roods 20 perches
Tithe no. 226 Rev. John Hales renting Garden Plot to Sarah Felstone. The area is 16 perches
all that the said Close of Meadow or pasture Ground now called Pear Close but lately know by the name of Edwards's Close containing 1 acre 2 roods 36 perches and being in Charmouth aforesaid and now in the occupation of William Burnard as tenant thereof And also all that one close of Meadow or Pasture Ground now called the Double Common but therefore known by the Name of Westleys and Braggs Closes containing 2 acres 25 perches also in Charmouth now in occupation of said William Stephens as tenant therof Also all that the said small Garden containing about 20 perches also situate in Charmouth aforesaid bounded by the Turnpike Road leading to Axminster and opposite to the said Dwelling House in the occupation of Said Mary Coffin which small garden is now held by Elizabeth Rickard and Mary Rickard for one life and also all that the said small piece or strip of Ground in Charmouth aforesaid now called the Potato Plot containing about 11 perches opposite the Close called the Single Common being divided therefore by the Road or Public Highway now in the occupation of the said Mary Coffin which said closes or pieces of land called Pear Close the Double Common of the same James Warden in the year 1788 by the said Brian Combe deceased
 
 
 
88.Freehold & Long Leaseholds, Rev. B. Coombe, Late Mables (£3-0-0d) 0a 1p 6r
93.Freehold & Long Leaseholds, William Hansford`s House & Orchard (£4-10-0d) 0a 2p 13r
1780 Poor Rates dispute William Coombe Dwelling House and lands in the possesion of Late Adneys
1798
1815 Poor Rates
 
In 1789 Frances is born to John and Prudence Diment
The Banns of Marriage of Frances Diment, aged 18, to William Cole of Charmouth
Banns for marriage of William Cole to Frances Diment in 1807 at Charmouth
1832 Poor Rates show Captain Symes as renting property to Mrs. Hull. Captain Spencer renting his property (Streets) to Mrs Coles. In 1847 John is renting off Mrs Symes. and Diggory Gorge is renting from Lady Spencer. They seem to have swopped houses.

Benjamin Adney Symes of Burton Bradstock, Captain in the 2nd Regiment of Somerstshire Militia in 1844 left to his wife Mary Symes Symes all his estate in Stoke St. Gregory Somerset. All that dwelling house orchard, harden and premises ghettos belonging situated in Charmouth in the occupation of John Coles.In 1828 married Mary Daniel in Burton Bradstock In 1775 his parents Richard Symes and Mary Adney married.

Benjamin Adney Symes was born in 1780 in Burton Bradstock, Dorset, the child of Richard and Mary. He married Mary Daniel on November 17, 1828, in Burton Bradstock, Dorset. He died in July 1844 at the age of 64.  

This is the last will of Benjamin Adney Symes of Burton Bradstock in the county of Dorset, Gentleman, a Captain in the 2nd Regiment of Somerset-shire Militia 1844. I give to my dear wife Mary Symes Symes all my Estate situated in Stoke St. Gregory in Somerset now in the occupation of James House also all that dwelling house, orchard, garden and premises thereto belonging situated in the Parish of Charmouth in the occupation of John Coles.
1841 Tithe Map enlarged with tenants and owners in brackets.
1841 Tithe Map
48
Didgory GORDGE
55
Reps. of Sir Richard SPENCER House, Garden & Orchard
-
1
36
47
John COLES
30
Benjamin Adney SYMES House, Garden & Orchard
-
2
22
46
Sarah FELSTONE
36
Reverend John HALES House & Garden
-
1
4

 
1886 Map showing same buildings before fire of 1894 destroyed them
The 1901 O/S Map shows Devon Edge rebuilt on same spot by Frank Cole and both "Streets" and "Lansdowne House" still vacant.
The same spot on the Map of 1928 with the piece of ground where "Streets" stood still vacant. Devons edge was built in 1895 and Lansdowne House shortly afterwards but with a passage to the west of it for access to the yard behind.
Today
1830 Pigots Directory shows both Frances Coles and Henry Diment as Bakers in Charmouth. John Felstone who lives next door is a Shopkeeper.
In 1839 William Burnard is shown here as a Sailcloth Maker, John Coles as a Baker and Sarah Felstone as a Shoemaker.
A family Tree originally drawn up by Reginald Pavey showing the marriage of William Cole to Frances Diment in 1807.
1841 Census shows Sarah Felstone, a Shoemaker aged 36 living with her five children
1841 Census shows Francis Coles, a Baker aged 30 living with his wife, Elizabeth, aged 32 and their 2 children. William Coles aged 25, his brother is living with them.
1851 Census
1861 Census
 
1871 Census
1879
1881 Census
1891 Census
1894 the shop was destroyed by fire, Coles at once began to build another to take its place. The result was "Sunnyside" afterwards named "Devon Edge" .
1901
21st February 1890
6th Februray 1891
10th January 1893
27th September 1895
1901 Census
Harry Pryer and Frank Coles in the Church Choir in 1892
Frank Coles and his son at bottom of the Street
This photograph shows William Holly with his popular coach outside Devons Edge, on the Street c. 1900
1911 Census
The 1927 Directory shows Frank W. Gamble as proprieter of Sunnyside at that time a Private Hotel. He is also shown as a Baker.
1935 Directory - George Grant is shown as Proprieter in that year.
The 1939 Directory for Charmouth shows "Sunnyside" renamed "Devonedge Private Hotel" under the proprietership of James Fripp.
Frank Coles stands proudly in front of his new Boarding House with its Bakers Shop to the right soon after it opened in 1900
A close up of the Bakers Shop in 1900
An unusual view looking up the Street with Devonedge on the right, soon after it was built.
Sunnyside in 1922 with its sign for the Cafe which served Lunchoens and Teas. Lansdowne House was a Garage at that time.
An unusual view from 1922 looking toward Devon Edge before shops were built on both sides. The carved figurehead was washed up on the beach and was placed in the grounds of Harry Pryers workshops and was a landmark until his death in 1931.
An Aerial view looking down on to Sunnyside in 1928. It clearly shows the large garden on the corner of Barrs Lane on the left.
A View from the 1930s
 
A view of Devonedge Hotel and an advert from the 1950s describing its benefits.
An Aerial photograph in the 1960s looking on to Devonedge.
This crash was in 1972.
A view of Post Office and Grinters the butchers in 1980s
Cars shunt outside Childs and Morgans on July 15th 1982
1984
 
There follows some fascinating photos in 1982 which reveal a number of changes in the shops and buildings. A number celebrate the end of the Falkland Wars.
Villagers celebrate the end of the Falkland Wars in 1982.
"Conan Doyle and two companions - one of them, Mr. Podmore, a diehard opponent of spiritualism—visited a haunted house in Charmouth. The old house was being rented by an elderly woman, her grown son, and a married daughter. The family was plagued by poltergeist activity, mostly in the form of unexplained noises that was so severe they could barely tolerate living there.  
The men began their investigation by checking the house for any sign of fraud and took other precautions that would prevent any trickery as they waited for the paranormal activity to manifest. On the first night, nothing at all occurred. On the second night, however, "a fearsome noise broke out," as Doyle described it. "It was like someone whacking a table with a heavy stick. The door of the sitting room was open and the noise reverberated down the passage." The men raced to find the cause of the noise, but none could be found, nor could any sign of hoaxing.  
Doyle writes an interesting coda to this story. About a year after the investigation, the house burned down and an old skeleton of a child of about ten was found buried in the garden. Doyle wondered if this child, cut down too early in its life, was the cause of the haunting.  
Doyle wrote that he did not submit a report about this investigation to the Society, but that the sceptic Podmore did - a report that irked Doyle. In his report, Podmore blamed the "unexplained" noises as a hoax perpetrated by the young man who lived in the house. This was nonsense, according to Doyle, because the young man "was actually sitting with us in the parlour when the trouble began. Therefore, the explanation given by Podmore was absolutely impossible.”
June 1894
16th August 1895
1934
1935
In 1924 the Stapleforths were living in Lower Sea Lane by 1930 they are in Park House. In 1936 they are shown at the Queens Armes.
 
1936
 
1815 Poor Rates have Rev. Brian Coombe rated for House (31/2) Handsford (61/2) Orchard (11/2)
1820 Poor Rates have Rev. Brian Coombe Executors rated for House (31/2,) Handsford (61/2), Orchard (11/2), William Burnard Field, Rev. Hodges Field, George Case 2 fields, William Stephens Field in total (81/2)
all that the said Close of Meadow or pasture Ground now called Pear Close but lately know by the name of Edwards's Close containing 1 acre 2 roods 36 perches and being in Charmouth aforesaid and now in the occupation of William Burnard as tenant thereof And also all that one close of Meadow or Pasture Ground now called the Double Common but therefore known by the Name of Westleys and Braggs Closes containing 2 acres 25 perches also in Charmouth now in occupation of said William Stephens as tenant therof Also all that the said small Garden containing about 20 perches also situate in Charmouth aforesaid bounded by the Turnpike Road leading to Axminster and opposite to the said Dwelling House in the occupation of Said Mary Coffin which small garden is now held by Elizabeth Rickard and Mary Rickard for one life and also all that the said small piece or strip of Ground in Charmouth aforesaid now called the Potato Plot containing about 11 perches opposite the Close called the Single Common being divided therefore by the Road or Public Highway now in the occupation of the said Mary Coffin
1823Poor Rates have Rev. Brian Coombe Executors (Warren & Co.)rated for Woonton- House (31/2,) Sweeting Handsford (61/2), Woonton-Orchard (11/2), William Burnard Field, Rev. Hodges Field, Joseph Wilson 2 fields in total (81/2)
1824 The Stone House is the only house with a basement kitchen, probably eighteenth century. Mr. Sweeting lived here in 1829 when he was elected Parish Surgeon by the Vestry at a salary of £10 a year for medicine and attendance -not including surgical or mid wifery cases. He attended T. Griffin for a wound in the throat in 1835 from 3rd. April till 29th. May for which he received £3-3-0. In September Joseph's daughter broke her arm but the Vestry Book, from which I copied these notes, gives no further details about these people, Mr, Sweeting was also a naturalist and in 1840, when a whale was washed up on Charmouth beach, he described it as a new species, Balaenoptera boopjs, but it is now known, according to Dr. W.D.Lang in 1956,to have been a common or fin whale. The corpse of the whale was claimed by John Tatchell Bullen, Lord of the manor of Marshwood, who divided it into four pieces and had each piece drawn up separately in a wagon with four horses to be exhibited in Mr. Bullen' s orchard.
Mary Wick Sweeting, wife of Robert Hallett Sweeting of Charmouth
1825
1829 Poor Rates have Rev. Brian Coombe Executors (Warren & Co.)rated for Woonton- House (6,) Love-Handsford (1/9), Woonton-Orchard (2), William Burnard Field (3), Rev. Hodges Field, Joseph Wilson 2 fields in total (81/2)
1832