Tylney House no. 4 Wood Street, Bath

The present building was erected in 1729 to the designs of the famous architect, John Wood, who gave his name to it. The adjoining street bears his Christian name - John. It is for this reason that it is grade 1 listed today. The area behind it was originally known as Barton Farm, with its farmhouse at the rear of what is now the department store - Jolly`s. To the rear of 4 Wood Street can still be seen a Barn and outbuildings which were part of it. In Bath`s Guildhall Archives can still be senthe twice yearly Rate Books for the City Centre which have been invaluable in the listing shown below of occupants. The first owner was Earl Tylney from whom the property gets its name. Before the Northumberland Buildings was built in 1776 on the site of Dr. Harrington's Garden by James Baldwin, the Street would have had fine prospects to the hills above Bath. Wood Street was to remain virtually unchanged until 1871 when the River family who were descendants of the original owners, The Gay family. It was in that year that a major scheme was carried out extending shop fronts into the street as can be seen in the accompanying plans below.
The ground floor had for two centuries been an Art Gallery, whose periodic exhibitions were advertised in the Bath Chronicle.William Smith was aCarver and Gilder of Frames from 1805-1819 and J.M. Hill carried on the same tarde from 1841-1896. Then Smith Freeth and Chard as shown there from 1902 until 1925, when gthey also occupied the neighbouring no. 5 Wood Street as well.In the 1920s with its neighbour it was run as the Queens Restaurant. Then the Dando family ran a successful Antique Shop here for nearly half a century. The present occupiers of the ground floor are the upmarket Estate Agents, Knight Frank.

 
1729
Built by John Wood
 
1
2
3
4
5
6
1734
Mr Dixons 1 House
Mr Dixons 2 House
Mr Dixons 3 House
Earle Tylney
Mrs Parker
Mr Matthews
1740
Mr Dixons 1 House
Mr Dixons 2 House
Mr Dixons 3 House
Earle Tylney
Mrs Parker
Mr Matthews
1743
Mr Dixons 1 House(Sheylor)
Mr Dixons 2 House(Stanford)
Mr Dixons 3 House(Mr Stanford)
Earle Tylney
Mrs Parker
Mr Matthews
1749
Fothergill/late Shaylers
Mr Joseph Chilcott(1st House)
Mr Joseph Chilcott(2nd House)
Knightly Esq.
Mrs Parkers
Robin Mattews
1754
Revd Mr Henry Fothergill
Mr Joseph Chilcott
Mr Dingley
Knightly Esq.
Mrs Galaway
Mr Robert Matthews
1756
Revd Mr Henry Fothergill
Mr Joseph Chilcott
Mr Dingley by Mr Hoare
Mr Knightly
Mrs Galaway
Mr Matthews
1767
Revd Mr Henry Fothergill
Mr Joseph Philcott
Mr Francis Chalie
Dr. William Rye
Dr. William Rye
Collett(Mrs Harford)
1770
Revd Mr Henry Fothergill
Mr Joseph Philcott
Mr William Buckle
Dr. William Rye
Dr. William Rye
Miss Frances Harford
1773
Revd Mr Henry Fothergill
Mr Joseph Philcott
Lady Shuckburgh
Dr. William Rye
Dr. Rye
Rayner (Frances Harford)
1775
Revd Mr Henry Fothergill
Mr Joseph Philcott
Mr James Browne
Mrs Margaret Twycross
Mrs Margaret Twycross
Mrs Jane Bowers
1776
Revd Mr Henry Fothergill
Mr Joseph Philcott
Mrs Georgina Brocas
Mrs Margaret Twycross
Mrs Margaret Twycross
Mrs Mary Staines
1781
Revd Mr Henry Fothergill
Mr Joseph Philcott
Mrs Georgina Brocas
Mrs Margaret Twycross
(died 1797)
Mrs Margaret Twycross
John Gent/Mrs Mary Staines
1782
Rev Dr. Fothergill
Mrs Mary Philcott
Mr Brocas
Mrs Mary Twycross
Mrs Mary Twycross
Mrs Ockford(Gent)
1783
Rev Dr. Fothergill
Mr Philpott
Mrs Mary Twycross
Mr Brocas
Mr John Gent/Ockford
1785
Rev Dr. Fothergill
Mrs Mary Philpott
Mrs Mary Twycross
Giles/Mrs Fay
Mr John Gent
(Apothecarist & Chemist)
1789
Rev Dr. Fothergill
Mrs Mary Philpott
Mrs Mary Twycross
Mrs Fay
Mr John Gent
1793
Rev Dr. Fothergill
Mrs Mary Philpott
Mrs Mary Twycross
Mr James King
Mr John Gent
1793
Rev Dr. Fothergill
Mrs Mary Philpott
Mrs Mary Twycross
Gent(Bath Guide)
Mr John Gent
1794
Rev Dr. Fothergill
Mrs Mary Philpott
Mrs Mary Twycross(no.3)
Mr James King or occupier
Mr John Gent
1797
Dr Fothergill
C. Philpott/Mrs Philpott
Mr Twycross/Hortons
John Self
(Carver & Guilder) Miss Smith to pay
Miss Thomas or Smith
1799
Dr Fothergill
C. Philpott/Mrs Philpott
Mr Horton
Mr J.Self/Gent (Apothecary)
Gent/ Smith
1800
Crook
Philpott/Chapman
Mrs Horton
Self/William Smith(No.2)
William Smith
Mr Frappel(Bath Guide)
1810
Charles Gerrish
Dan Godwin
Mrs Horton
William Smith(Carver & Guilder)
William Smith
Thomas Cam
1819   Mr. Godwin W.L. Viner - Teacher of the Harp and Pianoforte
L. Evill - Solicitor
W. Smith - Carver and Guilder   Miss Wallis - Academy for Young Ladies
G. Percivall - Overseer of Walcott
1820
Charles Gerrish
Dan Godwin/Mrs Ricketts
Luke Evill
William Smith
(Painter,Carver
& Guilder)
William Smith
George Percival
1830
Thomas Hyde
(Cabinet Maker)
Mrs Isabella Rickards
(Milliner)
William Lydiard
(Conveyancer)
Hugh Barker
(Taylor)
James Hopkins
(Glass Stainer) &
Charles Newman
(Hair Dresser)
John Bayley
1834   C. P. Slater - Surgeon William Lydiard
(Conveyancer)
     
1841
Mrs Hyde
Henry Mant
Lydiard
J.M.Hill,
born 1797
(Carver & Gilder)
Ben Arthur (Baker)
Wilkinson (Drawing Master)
1850
Mrs Hyde
Henry Mant (solicitor)
Lydiard
Hill & Son
(pictures)
Arthur
Wilcox
1855
Anne Rayner owner
1860
Mant
Robertson & Maule
H.F. Moger(house & Office)
John Hill
E.J.Smiths(Blinds)
M.Nicholls (House)
1864
E.J.Smiths(Blinds)
Macfarlanes(Music)
1871
Shop Fronts inserted in Wood Street
1896
John Hill
1897-1901
Smith & Chard
1902-1925
Smith & Freeth
1930-1940
Vanstones
(Electical Shop)
1940-45
Red Cross
1945-56
Queens
Restaurant
Queens Restaurant
1956-2002
Dandos
(Antiques)
2002-2005
Connells
Stoud & Swindon & King Sturge
Whistles & S J C Recruiting
Jenwood
(Gift Shop)
Bristol & West
Bristol & West
2006
Knight Frank
(Estate Agents)
2015
Knight Frank
(Estate Agents)
A more comprehensive illustrated History is shown below:
Barton Farm from Gilmour`s Map of Bath 1694
The Barton Farm House in 1849
An Advert for Jollys showing site of farm buildings in 1879

There is still a survival of the earlier history of the site to be seen today. For at the rear of ihe property is the entrance to a small barn, now behind the neighbouring Carter Jonas premises, which would have been an outbuilding for Barton Farm. The Barton Farm House had kept its own farmyard. until us late as 1752. Then during the third quarter of the l8th. century it was incorporated into a thoroughfare of adjoining houses called John Street. The Talbotype above shows how it looked in 1849 when it was already a building of considerable age and public interest. Barton Farm House (or Barton House as it was also known) remained in this state for only two more decades. In 1867 it was considerably altered and was incorporated into the premises of Messrs Jolly & Son. The photograph above shows how the same view appears today, which is opposite Hall Woodhouse Hostelry.
The Farm House originally was at the centre of an estate that covered Walcot and surrounding parishes.In 1547, Edward VI granted Sir William Herbert 'the grange and farm called Barton next Bath and all its demesne lands in the parishes of Lyncombe, Widcombe, Walcot and Barton ...all those closes adjacent to the said Grange and all the demesne,lands and works of customary tenants of Walcot and Barton and of other inhabitants within the hundred of Barton', which was formerly Bath Priory property. There follows a brief history of how the ownership of the Barton Farm Estate passed through a number of families. The final chapter of this story was as late as 1920 when descendants of the Rivers family sold off in 2 auctions the remainder of their Bath Properties which included parts of Wood Street, Gay Street and Queens Square
Sir William Herbert
Barton Grange was conveyed by Sir William Herbert (in exchange for other property) to Matthew Colthurst in 1548. The conveyance included courts-leet and view of frank pledge (i.e. the'lordship of Walcot'), advowson (of Walcot Church), fishing, etc. The property was held in chief of the Crown, by service of one-twentieth part of a knight's fee, paying yearly for the aforesaid grange and farm and other premises in Barton 29/ 4d.
Matthew & Edmund Colthurst
There had also been a Crown grant of 1543 to Matthew Colthurst of the site of the late Priory of Bath with closes 'Its Ham" and' Ambiyc Meade' in St .lames's parish and lands (named) in Lyncombe, Widcombe, Holloway and Walcot, and works of customary tenants , and the chief messuage of (Monkton) Combe ...all of which belonged to Bath Priory. Certain Priory' lands provided pasture for Barton stock and thus are named also in the Barton documents. Edmund Colthurst, son and heir of Matthew (died 8 July 1559), inherited all the Barton property, as detailed in the conveyance of 1548, as well us the site of the former Priory and its property (including his residence, Abbey House, adjoining the Abbey), granted in 1543.
Sir George & William Snigg
Edmund Colhurst sold Barton Grange (then in the occupation of William Sherston, son-in-law of Peter Bewshin, son of Henry, and the inheritor of the sub-tenure under the Colthursts) in 1591 to Sir George Snigg.
William Snigg, son and heir of Sir George (died 11 December 1617), inherited his father's Barton Grange property and Barton Rectory (this latter purchased by his father from the Crown lessees in 1612), and the Manor of Walcot (probably not acquired by his father until c.l611- see below). However, in 1635, being in serious financial difficulties, William unsigned Barton Grange, including Kingsmead (particularly mentioned), and an his other property in Walcot and Bath to Mary Jackson, his sister, for 5o years, on her undertaking to repay his debts. He then obtained Crown licences to sell to Thomas Haines, in 1638 and 1639, seven grounds of Barton Grange, and Haines became responsible for paying 12/4d of the annual Crown rent. The Haines family still held their Barton property in 1740.
Thomas & William Sounders
By 1656, Thomas Saunders the elder, of Beechwood, Herts, was the Lord of the Manor of Walcot. A lease of 1660 states that he possessed the land in Walcot in the right of his wife Mary, for about 55 years yet to come. She may, therefore, have been the daughter and heiress of Mary Jackson (the sister of William Snigg, to whom the latter had assigned his property in 1635 for 80 years). Thomas Saunders was perhaps of the family who had held the 'virgate' and other Walcot holdings during several generations. In 1681, William Hooper, the purchaser of certain Walcot lands, was' to do suit at the court of William Saunders [possibly the son of Thomas Holden for the manor of Walcot. A deed of common recovery, dated 10 October 1687, shows that a William Saunders (perhaps of the next generation} then acquired the inheritable freehold of the lordship of Walcot and rectory of Walcot, the latter being the Barton tithes. When he acquired Snigg's unsold parts of Barton Grange is clear, as the inheritance included the annual rent payable by Bath Corporation for 'Bath Common' (formerly Barton land -as above).
Robert Gay
On 16 June 1699, William Saunders sold the Manor and Rectory of Walcot, with appurtenances, courts, etc., 'except Barton Farm' (which he had already conveyed to two gentlemen, in trust 'to certain uses') and except a number of Walcot tenant holdings (sold in five separate lots, the largest share to his bailiff, William Hooper, in 1681-as above), to Robert Gay, an eminent surgeon in Hatton Garden, London and was an M.P. for Bath (who married Mary, daughter of William Saunders). In the early eighteenth century, Robert Gay had apparently also came into possession of Barton Farm, probably by virtue of his wife's inheritance, arranged by her father, when he had conveyed the farm in trust 'to certain uses'.
Thomas & Sir Benet Garrard
When Robert Gay died in 1737, he left the Bath property to his daughter Margaret, by his second wife who married THOMAS GARRARD on March 6th 1738/39. She died without issue in 1765 and left the estate to her brother-in-law, Sir Benet Garrard who in 1767, bequeathed all his Bath estate to Sir Peter Rivers, who look the name of Gay. The ground rents were sold after the death of Sir Henry Chandos Rivers in 1870.The GARRARDS were long the Lords of the Manor of Wheathamptonstead, Herts. They were there at least as early as the first quarter of the 17th century. The earliest Garrard tomb in the Church is a fine one with two reclining effigies to Sir JOHN GARRARD 1637 and Lady GARRARD 1632. There is a classical monument to a Sir John Garrard who died in 1700.The relevant monuments are—a Baroque cartouche to Sir SAMUEL GARRARD Bt., Lord Mayor of London, who died in 1724. He married his second wife, Jane Bennet of Salthorpe, Wilts, who erected the monument. Three sons survived Jane Bennet, all their monuments are at Wheathamptonstead Church'. Sir Samuel Garrard, Bt., died in 1761. A fine Mural Monument in baroque taste by Ford of Bath -the Inscription records his being at Eton and Queen's, Oxford. Also that lie was in the Army under Marlborough as a Lieutenant Colonel in his own regiment of Guards. He died without issue and apparently unmarried. Dr. THOMAS GARRARD, a lawyer and husband of Mrs Margaret Garrard (nee` Gay) whom he married on March 6th, 1738/39. He died in 1758 and is specifically stated to have had no issue. Sir BENET GARRARD died in 1767 -unmarried and without issue, bequeathed all his Bath estate to Sir Peter Rivers, who took the name of Gay. Mrs Margaret Garrard, (nee Gay) died in 1765.
Sir Peter & Henry Rivers,
There is a Mural Monument to the family in Winchester Cathedral. The Inscription states that Sir THOMAS RIVERS was the second, son of Sir John Rivers, Bt., of Chafford, Kent. He married Mary Holbrooke of the Isle of Wight,and had John, Anne, Peter and James. JOHN, on the death of his uncle in 1734, inherited the ancient title (i.e. the Baronetcy) -he was succeeded by his brother, PETER, who in 1767, by direction of Mrs Margaret Garrard took the family name and arms of GA Y—Sir Benet Garrard having, at her request and appointment, bequeathed to him on that condition, the MANOR of WALCOT near Bath and other estates in Somerset. PETER married Martha, daughter of William Coxe, M.D., by whom he had nine children -Thomas, James, William (died 1oth April 1794 aged 21), Henry, Mary (died 9th May 1781 aged 12}, Emilia Henrietta, Anne, Margaret (died 22nd February 1784 aged 7), and Maria Louise. (Five children were still alive when the memorial was erected), MARY, (lying in Bulb, is buried in the church at Waleot.Anne, Margaret and William are buried in Winchester Cathedral. Sir HENRY RIVERS resided at 18 Rivers Street which had one of the original Adam's fireplaces. He was Rector of Walcot from 1816-1818 and died in 1823, It is understood that Rivers Street was named after Sir Peter Rivers Gay, Bt., though he resided at Scotland Yard, Whitehall, ground rents were sold after the death of Sir Henry Chandos Rivers, in 1870.
The mansion that prevented John Wood from completing the west side of Queen Square could have been the Manor House as an Abstact of the Title of the building shows that from 10th June 1619 to the 15th December 1780, it was occupied in turn by William Snigge, William Saunders, Thomas and Margaret Garrard, Sir Benct Garrard, and the Rev. Sir Peter Rivers Gay, who were all Lords of the Manor of Walcot.

John Woods Signature on a Wood Street Deed.
John Wood and Ralph Allen
John Wood`s map of Queen`s Square in 1735 showing Wood Street, On the opposite side is the extensive garden of Doctor Harrington. In 1776 the Northumberland Buildings designed by James Baldwin were built. This row of houses are now occupied by Withy King and a number of financial firms.
A Map of the area around Wood Street, showing Dr. Harringtons fine Gardens on to which Tylney House would have once looked on.
 
Wood Street can be seen in this view with a red border
Paxton and Whitfield as it appeared in 1858 with Wood Street on the left.
 
earl tylney
Earl Tylney, of Castlemaine in the County of Kerry, was a title in the Peerage of Ireland. It was created on 11 June 1731 for Richard Child, 1st Viscount Castlemaine. The Child family descended from the merchant, economist and colonial administrator Josiah Child, who on 16 July 1678 was created a baronet, of Wanstead in the County of Essex.He is shown as occupying no. 4 Wood Street in the Electoral Roll for the Street in the Bath Archives for 1734 to 1743.
wood street

View of Milsom Street looking down towards Wood Street

wood street

Wood Street is seen here on the right with the gardens that were to be
built on when Northumberland place was built opposite

A View Looking down Wood Street c.1840
The Rates Book for Bath in 1820 show William Smith as occupying no. 4 Wood Street.
The Rates Book for Bath in 1860 show John and Edward Hill as occupying no. 4 Wood Street.
1858
A Prospect of the proposed new Shop Fronts for Wood Street in 1871 - Part 1
A Prospect of the proposed new Shop Fronts for Wood Street in 1871 - Part 2
 
 
 
Insurance Policy for 4 Wood Street in 1897
 
 
Jenwood Gift Shop bedecked with Flowers
 
 
A Plan of 4 Wood Street and adjoining businesses in 1895
Goad Insurance plan for Wood Street in 1927, red outline is 4 & 5 Wood Street

James King, the Master of Ceremonies whom Jane Austen mentions by name in Northanger Abbey, and who effected the introduction between Catherine Morland and Henry Tilney. He was the Master of Ceremonies at the Lower rooms from 1785. In 1805 he became the Master of Ceremonies at the Upper Rooms. But he was also the Master of Ceremonies at another spa with which Jane Austen was familiar. He served, during their summer season, at Cheltenham in Gloucestershire  from 1803 until his death in 1816.

The Bath Masters of Ceremonies  were often suave and handsome figures and it was not unknown for them to be involved in affairs of the heart.
At the Upper Assembly Rooms in Bath, poor Catherine Morland had to sit out the dance, having made no acquaintance with any gentleman. Luck was on her side later in the week when she and Mrs. Allen visited the Lower Rooms:

They made their appearance in the Lower Rooms; and here fortune was more favourable to our heroine. The master of the ceremonies introduced to her a very gentlemanlike young man as a partner; his name was Tilney. He seemed to be about four or five and twenty, was rather tall, had a pleasing countenance, a very intelligent and lively eye, and, if not quite handsome, was very near it. His address was good, and Catherine felt herself in high luck. There was little leisure for speaking while they danced; but when they were seated at tea, she found him as agreeable as she had already given him credit for being. He talked with fluency and spirit – and there was an archness and pleasantry in his manner which interested, though it was hardly understood by her. After chatting some time on such matters as naturally arose from the objects around them, he suddenly addressed her with – “I have hitherto been very remiss, madam, in the proper attentions of a partner here; I have not yet asked you how long you have been in Bath; whether you were ever here before; whether you have been at the Upper Rooms, the theatre, and the concert; and how you like the place altogether. I have been very negligent – but are you now at leisure to satisfy me in these particulars? If you are I will begin directly.” – Chapter 3, Northanger Abbey, Jane Austen.
The lower rooms, built in 1708, were Located on Terrace Walk near beautiful South Parade off the banks of the Avon River. James King, the Master of Ceremonies who introduced Henry Tilney to Catherine Morland, was an historic figure who actually performed as Master of Ceremonies in the lower rooms from 1785 to 1805. He then became M.C. of the upper rooms, which had recently been built in the newer more fashionable neighborhood uptown near The Circus. The Lower Assembly rooms sat in the older city center lower down, hence the distinction between upper and lower rooms.The lower rooms were used during the day for promenading and visiting and at night for dancing. Beautiful stone walks and terraces surrounded the building, which encouraged people to gather to see and be seen, and dawdle away a few pleasant hours.
The role of Master of Ceremonies was narrowly defined. He presided over social functions, welcomed newcomers, and enforced an official code of regulations designed to preserve decorum and promote social interaction. For this treason, the Master of Ceremonies was often referred to as the “King,” because his social authority within the city of Bath was regarded as absolute.” Jane Austen mentioned James King as Master of Ceremonies in the Lower Assembly Rooms, which forcibly reminds us that Northanger Abbey , while written in 1798 or 1799 (according to Cassandra), was not published until after her death.
Mr Tilney proceeds to tell Catherine what he would like her to write in her journal, and in so doing, mentions by name the Master of Ceremonies:

"‘I danced with a very agreeable young man, introduced by Mr King; had a great deal of conversation with him—seems a most extraordinary genius—hope I may know more of him.'”
At first glance, it seems as if Jane Austen has got her facts wrong. When Northanger Abbey was published in 1818, Mr King had long since ceased to be the Master of Ceremonies at the Lower Rooms; he was promoted to the Upper Rooms in 1805. However, Jane Austen wrote Northanger Abbey in the late 1790s and first submitted it for publication in 1803, at which time Mr King was still presiding over the Lower Rooms.

Upon arrival at Bath or another spa, the visitor was required to sign his or her name in the Pump Room book, after which he or she was waited upon by the Master of the Ceremonies.  He welcomed visitors, inquired into their satisfaction with their lodgings, ensured that they knew about the amenities of the city, and, in effect, interviewed them to be sure that they were of an appropriate quality to enter his domain.  Thus, when Mr. James King—a real person and the M.C. who effected the introduction of Mr. Tilney to Miss Morland—added the duties of M.C. at Cheltenham to those of Bath in 1803, he wrote in his Rules that “as it is absolutely necessary that no improper company should be permitted to frequent the assembly rooms, the Master of the Ceremonies particularly requests, that all strangers, (ladies as well as gentlemen), will give him an opportunity of being introduced, before they hold themselves entitled to receive that respect and attention, which is not more his duty than his inclination to observe” (Feltham 43).

King, who had served in the British army during the American war, began his rule in Bath in 1785, when he was elected without opposition as M.C. of the Lower Rooms.  In 1805, King became M.C. of the more prestigious Upper Rooms and reigned there until his death in 1816.  Austen knew very well that her contemporary readers would enjoy the joke of having this illustrious gentleman introduce her characters to each other, and this may be one of the first, if not the first, examples of interpolating a real person into a work of fiction.

Besides vetting strangers, the Master of the Ceremonies reigned over the dance floor, ensuring the precedence of rank and minimizing quarrels and heartache.  The role

of the master of the ceremonies is to introduce regularity into large assemblies, to keep order, to repress the ebullitions of passion, to banish, if possible, that contraction or thrusting out of the lips which Shakespear calls pouting ; to prevent violent suffusions or flushings in the female countenance; to keep the ladies from tossing [their heads], and their noses from turning up , when precedence , partners , and people that nobody knows , with a hundred other serious circumstances, excite those emotions.  He has also annexed to his office something clerical , it being his business to join hands :  but he goes still farther, he frequently procures partners , who sometimes under his banners enlist for life .  (Moser 190)

The position of the M.C. was lucrative as well as socially desirable, and it was coveted on both counts.  For example, when one of Nash's successors died in 1769, there was a violent dispute between two candidates for the position.  Circulars and pamphlets were issued, there were unruly meetings and even fisticuffs.  When one candidate appeared in the Assembly Room, a supporter of his adversary pulled him out by the nose.  Two weeks later there was a great encounter between the two parties.  A friend of the aggrieved candidate rose to speak, and his voice was drowned out by hisses.  This abuse was followed by blows and then a general melee, “in which the women were well to the fore.”  According to one account, women actually began the fray, tearing each other's dresses, laces, and hair.  It took the arrival of the Mayor, accompanied by officers of justice, to read the Riot Act three times to quell the uproar (Barbeau 112-14).  After tempers cooled, a third gentleman, Captain Wade, was elected by common agreement.

1816 - Obituary to James King

The following notes were supplied by Gordon Dando.
Certain information concerning 4,Wood Street,Bath.(formerly 2, Wood Street.) mainly to give some details of trades etc, persons that rented or owned these premises. More information could he obtained from the Rates office. In fact at one time I had such information, but am not now able to trace it.? Most details of owners obviously can be obtained from the Deeds, although they appear to' only start from the late 19th. Century. At that time there appears to have been a shared ownership, and my theory is that this is when the Deeds went stray?
1787- 1800. J.SELF. Carver and gilder.(also framer.)
1805- 1819-. W. SMITH. Carver and gilder.
Exact date not. known. Mr. Bell. 2 Wood St. (now 4.) Historical portrait, and miniature painter,& drawing master. A Mr. Hill also lived here up to 1850.
During the 1930's and up to about 1940 Vanstones, (Bath electrical etc. shop occupied these premises. During the war occupied by the Red Cross.
From about 1945 to 1956. Queen's Restaurant, who appear to have had the rear showroom constructed in the garden area. During this time the first floor was a ladies hairdresser, and the top flat by Mrs.Leigh Hunt, and her young daughter Barbara, fairly well known in theatre and Television plays. Barbara married in the late 1950's a Television actor named Richard Pascoe. Myself Gordon Dando started an antique shop at these premises in 1956, when my father purchased the property. For some years up to the sale of the property my son and myself occupied the whole premises.
The premises behind the Bristol & West were rented by us from 1956, and prior to this by the "Queens Restaurant which these used for their kitchen and cooking facilities.
These premises the rear part of which is said to have been part of the Barton Farm goes back to the 16th.Century as far as we have been able to ascertain. I well recall that before the war the Bristol and West shop area was owned by a Bath taylor named Titley & Son., and there was a way through to the rear premises by a passage between 4, Wood St., and the present no. 5 .Two separate trades were carried on in the rented rear premises. (ground & first floor with access to the first floor via a large wooden steps, in the small yard. Later the stairs were installed at the rear of the ground floor.

 
 
The Pump Room
Abbey Gate Street shown whilst it was being destroyed by Rosenburg. In the background is St. James Church, where Marks and Spencers is today.
St. James Church, where Marks and Spencers is today.